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PSU Keeps Burning Out

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March 5, 2012 1:38:04 AM

I'm trying to upgrade a PC for the first time, and I need some help.
I started with a Dell Inspiron 560, I added:
-Pentium i5
-GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 motherboard
-Corsair GS600 PSU
-Ultra Wizard Steel Series case

I installed all of the components according to the instructions, but when I plugged in the PSU and pressed the power button on the front I heard sort of a crackling sound and smelled something burning. I tested the PSU using a paperclip and it would turn on for a second or two and then stop. Assuming it was just faulty, I exchanged the PSU at the store I bought it from and tried again, only to have the same thing happen.

Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?

More about : psu burning

March 5, 2012 3:06:05 AM

what are all of your components.

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March 5, 2012 3:23:40 AM
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blars81 said:
I'm trying to upgrade a PC for the first time, and I need some help.
I started with a Dell Inspiron 560, I added:
-Pentium i5
-GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 motherboard
-Corsair GS600 PSU
-Ultra Wizard Steel Series case

I installed all of the components according to the instructions, but when I plugged in the PSU and pressed the power button on the front I heard sort of a crackling sound and smelled something burning. I tested the PSU using a paperclip and it would turn on for a second or two and then stop. Assuming it was just faulty, I exchanged the PSU at the store I bought it from and tried again, only to have the same thing happen.

Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?


Have you ever installed a Mother board before?? I hate to say it, but the chances of having 2 bad PSU in a row just isnt very likely. Sounds to me like you must have something grounded/wired way wrong. I hope you didn't fry your mbod. I am concerned that you may have somehow grounded your mbod to the case. I would take it all aprt. I would examine the mbod carefully and look for any popped capacitors, etc. Then, I'd be very careful about hooking all of the stuff back up. in fact, it might even br good to just install one item at atime. Try it, make sure it works, then install the next piece. Leave out all but the very essentials to make the computer work. Install the other stuff later, after you have it up and running, and only one item at a time! Good luck.
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March 5, 2012 3:37:31 AM

Did you install the motherboard spacers?

ie. these
March 5, 2012 3:50:10 AM

1tym.....Nice pic! I wanted to ask him if he used those and couldn't think of a good way to do it. good job!
March 5, 2012 4:01:01 PM

Causing a short circuit on a motherboard generally tends to fry them. You may have done this and caused some damage to the motherboard which is now preventing it from starting up. As terryd75 said, pull out the motherboard, and carefully inspect it closely looking for capacitors with blown tops, and resistors and chips that have soot near them. If you have any of these, then it is a goner (it may be anyway without the visual clues), and likely beyond repair.

Failing that, its a hard slog to determine the piece of failure. As it seems you aren't using a new CPU/RAM/GFX etc, it would usful to use your old Dell MB with all the components in and see if you can get it to start up with that, and if that works go back to the new MB. You can do this on a bench rather than put everything in a case (makes it easier to swap things about). If you do, make sure the MB is on a non conducting surface. If you want to be fancy, you can get special antistatic mats for this. I tend to use brown corrigated cardboard, or directly on a dry wooden bench - don't use the shiny MB box or the antistatic bag.
March 12, 2012 12:41:42 AM

Best answer selected by blars81.
!