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GSM Tower Strength

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even when
you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction. The
TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to full
strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
locations?
11 answers Last reply
More about tower strength
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    "SteveC" <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote:
    > We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength
    > even when you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every
    > direction. The TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new
    > and not up to full strength yet? Is there a site on internet where
    > you can find GSM tower locations?

    How do you know that your phone company's transmitter is on it or
    whether it is in operation or just in pre-op testing phase?

    Rudy
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    How do you know that tower is for your carrier?


    SteveC Wrote:
    > We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even
    > when
    > you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction.
    > The
    > TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to
    > full
    > strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
    > locations?


    --
    MarkPosted via T-MobileInfo.com www.t-mobileinfo.com
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    "SteveC" <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote in message
    news:V_BEe.25127$dz.12094@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
    > We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even
    when
    > you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction.
    The
    > TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to full
    > strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
    > locations?

    Usually your carrier will provide some type of map with the location of
    their coverage areas. If it's their tower, you should see a cone of good
    coverage around it. Also, depending on the frequency, the signal from the
    tower can be very weak right under and next to the tower, picking up in
    strength as you start moving away from it.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    The info from Cingular is that Unicel (formerly Cellular 1) operates the
    tower and that that Cingular leases from it. Unicel Customer Service
    confirms that it is their tower. It transmits TDMA and is being converted
    to GSM. Apparently, it is doing both right now. Cingular has another tower
    a few miles away that they built which will be operated by Unicel and will
    be GSM. Unicel is a rural carrier which has announced it will convert fully
    to GSM within 2 years. As a GSM tower, it does not seem to put out a strong
    signal. I am hoping that this is because it is newly converted and they are
    still working on it. I have 4 weeks during which I can cancel my contract
    with Cingular if I am dissatisfied. I could go with Unicel instead but if
    they are going to use the same towers, it really makes no difference.
    "R. P." <r_pol12gar@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:TsOdnZnV05drjH7fRVn-hw@comcast.com...
    > "SteveC" <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote:
    >> We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even
    >> when you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every
    >> direction. The TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new
    >> and not up to full strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you
    >> can find GSM tower locations?
    >
    > How do you know that your phone company's transmitter is on it or whether
    > it is in operation or just in pre-op testing phase?
    >
    > Rudy
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    Thanks. I always got a 4 out of 5 and sometimes a 5 from the tower at TDMA.
    My GSM varies from 1-6 on a 7 scale. It is the variation that slays me. It
    seems weaker nearer the tower as you say. I didn't notice that so much with
    TDMA. GSM phones are newer and may just be more sensitive to changes than
    the TDMA technology was. I do think that I can make phone calls more
    reliably with a 1 or 2 with GSM where as I needed a 3 on TDMA. The weak
    signals were often not good enough on TDMA. Is that your experience?
    "Todd Copeland" <todd@copelandhome.net> wrote in message
    news:eyLEe.3073$0C.1738@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > "SteveC" <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote in message
    > news:V_BEe.25127$dz.12094@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
    >> We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even
    > when
    >> you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction.
    > The
    >> TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to full
    >> strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
    >> locations?
    >
    > Usually your carrier will provide some type of map with the location of
    > their coverage areas. If it's their tower, you should see a cone of good
    > coverage around it. Also, depending on the frequency, the signal from the
    > tower can be very weak right under and next to the tower, picking up in
    > strength as you start moving away from it.
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.gsm - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <V_BEe.25127$dz.12094@bignews4.bellsouth.net> on Sat, 23 Jul 2005 20:19:11
    -0500, "SteveC" <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote:

    >We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even when
    >you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction. The
    >TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to full
    >strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
    >locations?

    How do you know you're not measuring a different tower that's farther away?

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    On 2005-07-24, <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote:

    > Thanks. I always got a 4 out of 5 and sometimes a 5 from the tower at TDMA.
    > My GSM varies from 1-6 on a 7 scale. It is the variation that slays me. It
    > seems weaker nearer the tower as you say. I didn't notice that so much with

    Although it is likely not a factor in this situation, it is possible
    to overload the front-end of a receiver by immediate proximity to the
    transmitting signal.

    Most often seen by ham operators and scanner fiends who are right next
    to the person who is transmitting. Counter-intuivive, I know.

    --
    http://cbsrmt.mousetrap.net/RMTdb/ CBS Radio Mystery Theater database
    http://greyhound.mousetrap.net/altus/ Altus, retired racer

    John McCain 2008 + http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant-runoff_voting
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

    No. Signal IS weaker near tower, specially when tower cover large area.
    That because how aerials are designed. Where I work I get weak signal
    and never closest - aerials are on the roof.


    "Frater Mus" <FraterMus2005@mousetrap.net> wrote in message news:42e7d2db$0$14460$8b463f8a@news.nationwide.net...
    > On 2005-07-24, <src.nospam@conklan.us> wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks. I always got a 4 out of 5 and sometimes a 5 from the tower at TDMA.
    >> My GSM varies from 1-6 on a 7 scale. It is the variation that slays me. It
    >> seems weaker nearer the tower as you say. I didn't notice that so much with
    >
    > Although it is likely not a factor in this situation, it is possible
    > to overload the front-end of a receiver by immediate proximity to the
    > transmitting signal.
    >
    > Most often seen by ham operators and scanner fiends who are right next
    > to the person who is transmitting. Counter-intuivive, I know.
    >
    > --
    > http://cbsrmt.mousetrap.net/RMTdb/ CBS Radio Mystery Theater database
    > http://greyhound.mousetrap.net/altus/ Altus, retired racer
    >
    > John McCain 2008 + http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant-runoff_voting
  9. Cellular antennas achieve tremendous gain by focusing the power from the transmitter. I'll explain how antenna gain works, then I'll give you an example you can easily visualize.

    Let's say the transmitter puts out one watt of actual energy into the antenna. If the antenna had zero gain, it would radiate that power with the one watt energy equally in all directions, around as well as up and down. But doing so wastes some of that energy, because it is presumed there are no cell phones being used directly above or below the tower. So they redirect the energy that would have gone up and down, and send it out sideways from the antenna, which is where the cellular phone users are located. Depending upon how much they squash the signal, the effective gain from the actual one watt signal going into the antenna can be much more than one watt coming out of the antenna.

    Gain is measured in decibels, abbreviated as dB. Every three dB is twice the effective power. Typically, they can get about 6 dB gain by focusing the signal outwards as opposed to up and down. This gives an effective radiated power of four watts if you are located along side the antenna. At the bottom of the tower, and directly above it, the power is a fraction of one watt effectively, and so the bars on your phone would read less than full. This also explains why cell phones do not work in airplanes at altitudes above about 1000 feet.

    Now for the visual. Take a four inch round ball of pizza dough. From the middle of the ball, the dough extends out 2 inches in all directions; up, down and all around. But flatten it enough and you can make a 16 inch pizza pie. Now the dough extends eight inches in all directions "around" the center point, but only a fraction of an inch "above and below" the center point. The directional dimensions have changed, but the overall amount of dough is still the same.

    Squashing the ball of dough makes the pie bigger around without increasing the amount of dough from the original ball. The gain antenna system squashes the radio signal to get more distance around the tower, but uses no extra energy to get that more distant signal.

    Rick Bennette. www.fineartvideo.com
  10. DUDE Wht's these all

    "We have a new GSM tower here but it rarely registers full strength even when
    you are under it. I have driven all around and out in every direction. The
    TDMA would always go to the top. Is it that it is new and not up to full
    strength yet? Is there a site on internet where you can find GSM tower
    locations? "


    how u know that tower near ur terrace is ur transmmiter ???????????


    excellent dude 4 stupid question


    it's problem with ur receiver antennae and nothin else
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