Walking stick and monopod, all in one?

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
find and buy it?
Nobody
45 answers Last reply
More about walking stick monopod
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could
    > I
    > find and buy it?
    > Nobody
    >

    Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.

    They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or other
    bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    Most of them are also adjustable in length.

    Roy G
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    News wrote:
    > "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    > >
    > > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    > > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    > >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could
    > >> I
    > >> find and buy it?
    > >> Nobody
    > >>
    > >
    > > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    > >
    > > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or other
    > > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    > > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    > >
    > > Roy G
    > Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    > back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...

    All you need to make your own is a wood lathe, a couple turning tools,
    and some wood billets (I'm turning several of cherry). Lee Valley has
    the needed hardware, including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Gitzo Monotrek. Nice walking stick with a small ball-head at the top.

    "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could
    > I
    > find and buy it?
    > Nobody
    >
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    In article <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>,
    nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:

    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    > find and buy it?
    > Nobody

    Novoflex makes one from a Leki pole. It can be used by itself as a
    monopod or walking stick/cross country stick or with a Novoflex BB Ball
    to make a duopod or a tripod. Very light weight and extremely strong.
    Available from camera store. It's name is BB STOCK.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 2005/6/4 6:01 AM, "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:

    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    > find and buy it?


    These are commonly sold in hiking/camping equipment stores. I have one from
    REI. See
    http://www.rei.com/product/980.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPINGundefined
    for a similar unit.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in
    news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re:

    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    > could I find and buy it?
    > Nobody
    >

    My monopod works fine as a walking stick, dunno if it's meant to but it
    does.

    Mick Brown
    www.photo.net/photos/mlbrown
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    >
    > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could
    >> I
    >> find and buy it?
    >> Nobody
    >>
    >
    > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    >
    > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or other
    > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    >
    > Roy G
    Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    News wrote:
    > "Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:1117883364.844068.26210@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > >
    > >
    > > News wrote:
    > >> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    > >> news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    > >> >
    > >> > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    > >> > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    > >> >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    > >> >> could
    > >> >> I
    > >> >> find and buy it?
    > >> >> Nobody
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    > >> >
    > >> > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or
    > >> > other
    > >> > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    > >> > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    > >> >
    > >> > Roy G
    > >> Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    > >> back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...
    > >
    > > All you need to make your own is a wood lathe, a couple turning tools,
    > > and some wood billets (I'm turning several of cherry). Lee Valley has
    > > the needed hardware, including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com
    >
    > To paraphrase Mrs Beeton - first catch your lathe...

    That do help. But think of all the money you can save. Less than $20
    for hardware, under $10 for cherry or other hardwood. Of course, a
    decently capable lathe costs at least $500, a set of good turning tools
    about $150 to $300 (depends on your definition of "good"), a stand
    costs whatever you're able to spend, and it takes about three months of
    all your spare time to become proficient in spindle turning.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    nobody wrote:

    >Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    >find and buy it?
    >Nobody

    Google is your friend. Try searching for "walking stick monopod".

    You can buy them at many hiking equipment stores. I know EMS stores
    carry them in stock. Here is a link for the hiking stick I purchased
    from EMS:

    http://www.ems.com/products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524441774629&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=282574489160414&fromTemplate=search%2Fresults.jsp&bmUID=1117887423195

    Another online source is REI, if you search "walking stick monopod" at
    REI you'll see several. Here is one.

    http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=47670657&parent_category_rn=11770843&vcat=REI_SEARCH

    However, I suggest you consider a monopod to use as a hiking stick,
    rather than a hiking stick to use as a monopod. I own both a walking
    stick and a monopod, and I find I use the monopod rather than the
    walking stick. The monopod makes a fine walking stick when needed. And
    it is stiffer than the walking stick, which makes it a better platform
    for taking photos.

    My monopod collapses in 4 sections to about 20 inches (including the
    small ball head), while the hiking stick collapses in 2 sections to
    about 30 inches. That means the monopod fits nicely in a day pack, or
    can be velcro'd to the outside of a day or fanny pack horizontally
    without sticking out the sides. The hiking stick is a pain to carry if
    you don't want to be using it. I don't want to use a walking stick all
    the time, so this is a concern. If you be using your walking stick all
    the time you are walking, then collapsed size is less of an issue.

    Here's the monopod I use, a Slik Lighty Pod II:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=48636&is=REG

    Cost is slightly less than the walking sticks, and it includes a small
    ball head (which you would have to purchase additional with the
    walking stick).

    Terrry
  10. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    nobody wrote:

    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    > could I find and buy it?
    > Nobody
    I haven't seen one for over 40 years but have never owned one myself.
    I think that the last one I saw was in Wallace Heatons in London
    although they may have expired by now.
    --
    neil
    delete delete to reply
  11. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Mick Brown wrote:

    > nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in
    > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re:
    >
    >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    >> could I find and buy it?
    >> Nobody
    >>
    >
    > My monopod works fine as a walking stick, dunno if it's meant to but
    > it does.
    >
    > Mick Brown
    > www.photo.net/photos/mlbrown
    There also used to be a shooting stick that doubled as a monopod, very
    convenient in fields although not so good on hard surfaces.
    --
    neil
    delete delete to reply
  12. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    nobody wrote:
    > Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    > find and buy it?
    > Nobody
    >
    Interesting idea. Surely someone has thought of it before....


    --
    Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
  13. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry" <no@email.invalid> wrote in message
    news:tc63a1164abt7t2l8safu52s5bmphmq3j4@4ax.com...

    > My monopod collapses in 4 sections to about 20 inches (including the
    > small ball head), while the hiking stick collapses in 2 sections to
    > about 30 inches. That means the monopod fits nicely in a day pack, or
    > can be velcro'd to the outside of a day or fanny pack horizontally
    > without sticking out the sides. The hiking stick is a pain to carry if
    > you don't want to be using it. I don't want to use a walking stick all
    > the time, so this is a concern. If you be using your walking stick all
    > the time you are walking, then collapsed size is less of an issue.
    >
    > Here's the monopod I use, a Slik Lighty Pod II:
    >
    > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=48636&is=REG
    >
    > Cost is slightly less than the walking sticks, and it includes a small
    > ball head (which you would have to purchase additional with the
    > walking stick).
    >
    > Terrry


    I recently bought a Velbon monopod which uses a similar leg to the one on
    the Velbon Sherpa tripod.

    I noticed that the head mounting bolt was noticeably shorter that the one on
    the tripod, 2.5 complete turns to screw the head on the monopod versus 7
    complete turns to screw the same head onto the tripod.

    I was/am a bit concerned about the security of the head - but when I checked
    with a couple of other makes (Manfrotto & Jessops own brand) the bolt
    threads on those were similarly short.

    So, are short mounting bolts a feature of all monopods?
  14. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Ethic" <email@nospamethical-web.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:3gdmcdFbi2usU1@individual.net...
    >
    > "Terry" <no@email.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:tc63a1164abt7t2l8safu52s5bmphmq3j4@4ax.com...
    >
    >> My monopod collapses in 4 sections to about 20 inches (including the
    >> small ball head), while the hiking stick collapses in 2 sections to
    >> about 30 inches. That means the monopod fits nicely in a day pack, or
    >> can be velcro'd to the outside of a day or fanny pack horizontally
    >> without sticking out the sides. The hiking stick is a pain to carry if
    >> you don't want to be using it. I don't want to use a walking stick all
    >> the time, so this is a concern. If you be using your walking stick all
    >> the time you are walking, then collapsed size is less of an issue.
    >>
    >> Here's the monopod I use, a Slik Lighty Pod II:
    >>
    >> http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=48636&is=REG
    >>
    >> Cost is slightly less than the walking sticks, and it includes a small
    >> ball head (which you would have to purchase additional with the
    >> walking stick).
    >>
    >> Terrry
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > I recently bought a Velbon monopod which uses a similar leg to the one on
    > the Velbon Sherpa tripod.
    >
    > I noticed that the head mounting bolt was noticeably shorter that the one
    > on
    > the tripod, 2.5 complete turns to screw the head on the monopod versus 7
    > complete turns to screw the same head onto the tripod.
    >
    > I was/am a bit concerned about the security of the head - but when I
    > checked
    > with a couple of other makes (Manfrotto & Jessops own brand) the bolt
    > threads on those were similarly short.
    >
    > So, are short mounting bolts a feature of all monopods?
    >
    Probably to get the monopod on and off quickly. Remember, the monopod is
    not actually supporting the camera, like, you're not going to walk away from
    it. It's just an addition to the camera to make it more stable. You still
    have to hold the camera to take a shot, not the monopod.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 09:02:00 -0400, "TAFKAB" <not@right.now>
    wrote:

    >Gitzo Monotrek. Nice walking stick with a small ball-head at the top.

    Good choice if a little expensive. I have a Leki "Sierra
    Photo", lighter (and cheaper) than the Gitzo but with no
    ball head just a 1/4" screw under a woden knob. The same
    stick is sold branded as Novoflex (BBSTOCK). The Leki is
    extremely reliable and surprisingly rigid for such a light
    stick. Available from outdoor sports and clothing suppliers
    as well as many photographic outlets.

    --
    Regards

    John Bean
  16. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:1117883364.844068.26210@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >
    >
    > News wrote:
    >> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    >> >
    >> > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    >> > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    >> >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    >> >> could
    >> >> I
    >> >> find and buy it?
    >> >> Nobody
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    >> >
    >> > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or
    >> > other
    >> > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    >> > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    >> >
    >> > Roy G
    >> Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    >> back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...
    >
    > All you need to make your own is a wood lathe, a couple turning tools,
    > and some wood billets (I'm turning several of cherry). Lee Valley has
    > the needed hardware, including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com

    To paraphrase Mrs Beeton - first catch your lathe...
  17. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Hi,

    There's a "reader's offers" page in Digital Photo magazine from April which
    lists an EXPED Viewfinder walking pole/monopod which should do just what you
    want.

    --
    Paul ============}
    o o

    // Live fast, die old //
    PaulsPages are at http://homepage.ntlworld.com/pcbradley/
  18. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    >"Ethic" <email@nospamethical-web.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:3gdmcdFbi2usU1@individual.net...
    >>
    >> I recently bought a Velbon monopod which uses a similar leg to the one on
    >> the Velbon Sherpa tripod.
    >>
    >> I noticed that the head mounting bolt was noticeably shorter that the one
    >> on the tripod, 2.5 complete turns to screw the head on the monopod
    >> versus 7 complete turns to screw the same head onto the tripod.
    >>
    >> I was/am a bit concerned about the security of the head - but when I
    >> checked with a couple of other makes (Manfrotto & Jessops own brand)
    >> the bolt threads on those were similarly short.
    >>
    >> So, are short mounting bolts a feature of all monopods?
    >>
    >Probably to get the monopod on and off quickly. Remember, the monopod is
    >not actually supporting the camera, like, you're not going to walk away from
    >it. It's just an addition to the camera to make it more stable. You still
    >have to hold the camera to take a shot, not the monopod.
    >

    Yeah, while taking the shot you hold the camera. But I routinely carry
    the monopod with the camera still attched. Sometimes over my shoulder,
    sometimes with the monopod horizontal. So I sure hope it's securely
    attached!

    I never noticed this before, but I just checked my Slik Lighty Pod II,
    and you're right, it has a short bolt, about 2.5 turns. My tripod
    bolts are signicantly longer.

    It's never bothered me in use, seems quite secure.

    Terry
  19. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 11:01:01 +0100, in rec.photo.digital , nobody
    <nobody@nowhere.com.re> in <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>
    wrote:

    >Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    >find and buy it?
    >Nobody

    http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?memberId=12500226&productId=9296

    $45


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  20. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 4 Jun 2005 12:17:40 -0700, in rec.photo.digital , "Charlie Self"
    <charliediy@aol.com> in
    <1117912660.781021.260300@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >News wrote:
    >> "Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote in message
    >> news:1117883364.844068.26210@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > News wrote:
    >> >> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> >> news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    >> >> > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    >> >> >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    >> >> >> could
    >> >> >> I
    >> >> >> find and buy it?
    >> >> >> Nobody
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or
    >> >> > other
    >> >> > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    >> >> > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Roy G
    >> >> Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    >> >> back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...
    >> >
    >> > All you need to make your own is a wood lathe, a couple turning tools,
    >> > and some wood billets (I'm turning several of cherry). Lee Valley has
    >> > the needed hardware, including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com
    >>
    >> To paraphrase Mrs Beeton - first catch your lathe...
    >
    >That do help. But think of all the money you can save. Less than $20
    >for hardware, under $10 for cherry or other hardwood. Of course, a
    >decently capable lathe costs at least $500, a set of good turning tools
    >about $150 to $300 (depends on your definition of "good"), a stand
    >costs whatever you're able to spend, and it takes about three months of
    >all your spare time to become proficient in spindle turning.

    Oh, to live the _Groundhog's Day_ life.


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  21. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 12:29:22 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , Terry
    <no@email.invalid> in <tc63a1164abt7t2l8safu52s5bmphmq3j4@4ax.com>
    wrote:

    [snip]

    >Another online source is REI, if you search "walking stick monopod" at
    >REI you'll see several. Here is one.
    >
    >http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=47670657&parent_category_rn=11770843&vcat=REI_SEARCH
    >
    >However, I suggest you consider a monopod to use as a hiking stick,
    >rather than a hiking stick to use as a monopod. I own both a walking
    >stick and a monopod, and I find I use the monopod rather than the
    >walking stick. The monopod makes a fine walking stick when needed. And
    >it is stiffer than the walking stick, which makes it a better platform
    >for taking photos.
    >
    >My monopod collapses in 4 sections to about 20 inches (including the
    >small ball head), while the hiking stick collapses in 2 sections to
    >about 30 inches. That means the monopod fits nicely in a day pack, or
    >can be velcro'd to the outside of a day or fanny pack horizontally
    >without sticking out the sides. The hiking stick is a pain to carry if
    >you don't want to be using it. I don't want to use a walking stick all
    >the time, so this is a concern. If you be using your walking stick all
    >the time you are walking, then collapsed size is less of an issue.
    >
    >Here's the monopod I use, a Slik Lighty Pod II:
    >
    >http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=48636&is=REG
    >
    >Cost is slightly less than the walking sticks, and it includes a small
    >ball head (which you would have to purchase additional with the
    >walking stick).
    >
    >Terrry

    I suspect that a monopod is not designed to take as much stress. For
    the normal walk, that is fine. But I wonder if it will stand up if you
    trip and put your weight on it. That said, I decided against a walking
    stick that could be a monopod because of the lack of the ball head.
    That would be very nice.


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  22. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Charlie Self wrote:

    > Lee Valley has the needed hardware,
    > including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com

    http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32835&cat=1,250,43243

    Neat site. Thanks for the link.
  23. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Matt Silberstein wrote:

    >I suspect that a monopod is not designed to take as much stress. For
    >the normal walk, that is fine. But I wonder if it will stand up if you
    >trip and put your weight on it.

    I wonder about that too. I doubt the metal is a problem, they are
    quite strong and stiff, but I wonder about the latches -- will they
    slip? However, my experience is that I have used a monopod to cross
    streams and climb down boulder fields, and put most of my weight on
    it, and not had any problems.

    >That said, I decided against a walking
    >stick that could be a monopod because of the lack of the ball head.
    >That would be very nice.

    It's essential unless all you want to do is take landscape orientation
    shots of the horizon. :) Of course it is just a cost issue -- you can
    add a ball head to your walking stick.

    Terry
  24. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 00:27:09 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , Terry
    <no@email.invalid> in <7l57a1pp19j1p5007thk65hmh9d5kcgatq@4ax.com>
    wrote:

    >Matt Silberstein wrote:
    >
    >>I suspect that a monopod is not designed to take as much stress. For
    >>the normal walk, that is fine. But I wonder if it will stand up if you
    >>trip and put your weight on it.
    >
    >I wonder about that too. I doubt the metal is a problem, they are
    >quite strong and stiff, but I wonder about the latches -- will they
    >slip? However, my experience is that I have used a monopod to cross
    >streams and climb down boulder fields, and put most of my weight on
    >it, and not had any problems.
    >
    >>That said, I decided against a walking
    >>stick that could be a monopod because of the lack of the ball head.
    >>That would be very nice.
    >
    >It's essential unless all you want to do is take landscape orientation
    >shots of the horizon. :) Of course it is just a cost issue -- you can
    >add a ball head to your walking stick.

    If money were a concern could you suggest an inexpensive one for the
    amateur?


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  25. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sun, 5 Jun 2005 21:38:45 -0500, in rec.photo.digital , "Tetractys"
    <farga@palenga.jengis> in <gZGdnTE7cbzVKj7fRVn-og@comcast.com> wrote:

    >Charlie Self wrote:
    >
    >> Lee Valley has the needed hardware,
    >> including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com
    >
    >http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32835&cat=1,250,43243
    >
    >Neat site. Thanks for the link.
    >
    I didn't see that when I first went to the site. Thanks for finding it
    and showing it.


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  26. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry <no@email.invalid> wrote:

    : Yeah, while taking the shot you hold the camera. But I routinely carry
    : the monopod with the camera still attched. Sometimes over my shoulder,
    : sometimes with the monopod horizontal. So I sure hope it's securely
    : attached!

    : I never noticed this before, but I just checked my Slik Lighty Pod II,
    : and you're right, it has a short bolt, about 2.5 turns. My tripod
    : bolts are signicantly longer.

    : It's never bothered me in use, seems quite secure.

    Some cameras had a problem with a short depth of the tripod screw
    receptacle on the camera. So many manufacturers made their mounting crew
    short or had an adjusting threaded flange that will allow the short depth
    to still firmly hold the camera (so it dosen't pivot on the screw). But I
    personally wouldn't trust the weight of my camera to a single screw. Too
    many pieces could fale and dump my camera on the ground. I would get a
    "quick release" head that will screw into the tripod screw on the monopod
    and then into the camera. This makes the attaching and removal of the
    camera a momentary movement. You can still carry the pod fully extended
    over your sholder, but the camera can hang securly around your neck where
    it has much less chance of being dropped.

    I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)

    JMHO

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
  27. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Matt Silberstein wrote:

    >On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 00:27:09 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , Terry
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Of course it is just a cost issue -- you can
    >>add a ball head to your walking stick.
    >
    >If money were a concern could you suggest an inexpensive one for the
    >amateur?

    For monopod use, I think almost any inexpensive ball head would work
    fine. You should be able to get one for under $20, depending on how
    much weight you need to support. B&H lists 6 for under $20, including
    a Giotto for $10.

    I have used only the Slik that came with my monopod, so I don't have
    any direct comparison information.

    Terry
  28. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 11:03:26 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , Terry
    <no@email.invalid> in <pra8a1h4793a478pr35urf5pcq7rshk1j1@4ax.com>
    wrote:

    >Matt Silberstein wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 00:27:09 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , Terry
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Of course it is just a cost issue -- you can
    >>>add a ball head to your walking stick.
    >>
    >>If money were a concern could you suggest an inexpensive one for the
    >>amateur?
    >
    >For monopod use, I think almost any inexpensive ball head would work
    >fine. You should be able to get one for under $20, depending on how
    >much weight you need to support. B&H lists 6 for under $20, including
    >a Giotto for $10.
    >
    >I have used only the Slik that came with my monopod, so I don't have
    >any direct comparison information.

    Thanks.


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
  29. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 6/5/05 11:42 PM, in article d80k70$fk2$1@wildfire.prairienet.org, "Randy
    Berbaum" <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
    >
    Snip
    > I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    > same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    > switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    > plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    > unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    > hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)
    >
    > JMHO
    >
    > Randy
    >
    > ==========
    > Randy Berbaum
    > Champaign, IL
    >
    This company:
    http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/
    makes the plates and clamps so that you can do exactly what your are talking
    about. I put one of their quick release clamps on a very small head on my
    monopod so that I don't have to remove the plate on my camera or lens every
    time I switch from a tripod to a monopod. Their system is not cheap to buy
    into but once you have it it offers a lot of flexibility. Fyi - I have no
    connection with the company.
    Chuck
  30. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    In article <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>,
    nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:
    >Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    >find and buy it?
    >Nobody
    >
    When I was in Austria a few years ago, I bought a pair of ski/hiking
    poles. It is "calibrated" and adjustable. I fit it on the top with
    a 1/4-20 screw and covered it with a large flat plastic nut (as a safety
    protection). It is excellent for the three purposes. It is sturdy and
    strong. This is another solution in additional to the many others
    suggested here.

    Good luck!
  31. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 18:35:21 +0100, "News"
    <Keith@nohtsystems.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

    >
    >"Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote in message
    >news:1117883364.844068.26210@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >>
    >> News wrote:
    >>> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>> news:LHfoe.5712$hT6.5326@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
    >>> >
    >>> > "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
    >>> > news:BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
    >>> >> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where
    >>> >> could
    >>> >> I
    >>> >> find and buy it?
    >>> >> Nobody
    >>> >>
    >>> >
    >>> > Try your nearest Hillwalking / Mountaineering equipment shop.
    >>> >
    >>> > They do make Walking Poles, which can have a variety of Handles or
    >>> > other
    >>> > bits fitted, including a Camera Tripod Screw.
    >>> > Most of them are also adjustable in length.
    >>> >
    >>> > Roy G
    >>> Just what I went looking for yesterday (saw them in Milletts a few years
    >>> back, they don't have them now). Need to keep looking...
    >>
    >> All you need to make your own is a wood lathe, a couple turning tools,
    >> and some wood billets (I'm turning several of cherry). Lee Valley has
    >> the needed hardware, including the tripod screw. www.leevalley.com
    >
    >To paraphrase Mrs Beeton - first catch your lathe...
    >

    First catch your local ski shop.
  32. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 22:23:16 GMT, Terry <no@email.invalid> wrote:


    >Yeah, while taking the shot you hold the camera. But I routinely carry
    >the monopod with the camera still attched. Sometimes over my shoulder,
    >sometimes with the monopod horizontal. So I sure hope it's securely
    >attached!
    >
    >I never noticed this before, but I just checked my Slik Lighty Pod II,
    >and you're right, it has a short bolt, about 2.5 turns. My tripod
    >bolts are signicantly longer.
    >
    >It's never bothered me in use, seems quite secure.

    If in doubt, attach a lanyard to the stick with a snap on the
    end of the cable to snag something on the camera.
  33. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 04:42:08 +0000 (UTC), Randy Berbaum
    <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:


    >I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    >same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    >switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    >plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    >unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    >hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)
    >
    >JMHO
    >
    >Randy
    >
    >==========
    >Randy Berbaum
    >Champaign, IL

    Shouldn't both use the same 1/4 - 20 screw as the camera?
  34. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Randy Berbaum <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> writes:

    > I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    > same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    > switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    > plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    > unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    > hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)

    I use a separate mounting plate on top of the tripod and flash brackets (no
    monopod currently). I use a Sima QuicKonnect I got from my local Microcenter
    for ~ $8, and have multiple for each tripod/flash bracket and camera. I like
    it in that it is small enough not to block the battery door on my C-2100UZ.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
    http://www.the-meissners.org
  35. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 23:30:54 +0000, kashe wrote:

    > On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 04:42:08 +0000 (UTC), Randy Berbaum
    > <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    >>same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    >>switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    >>plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    >>unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    >>hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)
    >>
    >>JMHO
    >>
    >>Randy
    >>
    >>==========
    >>Randy Berbaum
    >>Champaign, IL
    >
    > Shouldn't both use the same 1/4 - 20 screw as the camera?
    Not necessarily as 5/16 is also a standard.
    --
    neil
    delete delete to reply
  36. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:17:42 +0000 (UTC), ih@duck.ee.udel.edu (Charlie
    Ih) wrote:

    >In article <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>,
    >nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:
    >>Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    >>find and buy it?
    >>Nobody
    >>
    >When I was in Austria a few years ago, I bought a pair of ski/hiking
    >poles. It is "calibrated" and adjustable. I fit it on the top with
    >a 1/4-20 screw and covered it with a large flat plastic nut (as a safety
    >protection). It is excellent for the three purposes. It is sturdy and
    >strong. This is another solution in additional to the many others
    >suggested here.
    >
    >Good luck!
    >
    >

    The suggested idea of converting a ski poles into monopods is
    great! A good friend of mine has a pair of old ski poles he was going
    to throw away, so I will gladly take them from him & convert them.

    The down side is that the ski pole is a fixed length, yes I
    can shorten it as needed when I convert it but it won't be collapsible
    & extendable as many monopods are.

    On the up side:

    1> The cost is great, often free for the poles. If you don't know a
    skier who is upgrading ask @ a local ski/sporting store, because they
    may get skier come in with 1 pole to match up the to another set
    because they damaged 1 pole. After they have matched it up with a new
    set of their likely they will likely tell the store to toss out the
    single pole which they may save for your use.

    2> This poles are light weight & strong.

    3> They already have a spike on the end, a handle on top & most also
    have a lanyard.

    There is 1 function I hope to do with a P&S with a converted
    ski pole that might prove interesting & that is to take overhead
    shots. Sure I can do this now with my Canon A95 thanks to it's swivel
    1.8" LCD screen but I am limited to my arms length. Now with it on a
    monopod, I could get at least an extra 2 feet.

    Yes I would either need to 1st set the self 10 second timer or
    possibly rig a mechanical remote shutter system. I'll try the self
    timer 1st & if the added 2 or so feet prove of interest, I can
    consider rigging 1 with some type of remote shutter system.

    Group of crowd shots from 7 to 9 feet above ground level may
    prove to be interesting & yes I know it will place the camera @ some
    risk but @ times I think it may be worth it.

    Thanks to everybody for all of the ideas, now I have something
    else to try that may make for some interesting pictures. With all of
    the very light & tiny cameras now available like the Canon SD400, I
    would think we may be seeing more quality digital pictures being taken
    from Radio Controlled model airplanes & helicopters.

    Respectfully, DHB

    ..

    "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President,
    or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong,
    is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable
    to the American public."--Theodore Roosevelt, May 7, 1918
  37. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    DHB wrote:
    > On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:17:42 +0000 (UTC), ih@duck.ee.udel.edu
    > (Charlie
    > Ih) wrote:
    >
    >> In article <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>,
    >> nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:
    >>> Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so,
    >>> where
    >>> could I find and buy it?
    >>> Nobody

    <snip>

    >
    > Group of crowd shots from 7 to 9 feet above ground level may
    > prove to be interesting & yes I know it will place the camera @ some
    > risk but @ times I think it may be worth it.
    >
    > Thanks to everybody for all of the ideas, now I have something
    > else to try that may make for some interesting pictures. With all
    > of
    > the very light & tiny cameras now available like the Canon SD400, I
    > would think we may be seeing more quality digital pictures being
    > taken
    > from Radio Controlled model airplanes & helicopters.
    >
    > Respectfully, DHB
    >

    Twenty years or so ago I used a Canon A1 on a monopod to get "in
    front" of the crowd. It had a mechanical shutter-release activated by
    an air tube and bulb. Twenty-four mm lens and a small ball head. As
    pointed out by someone, it took a fair amount of muscle, but two-hand
    grip is possible, and if you keep it close to balance, disasters are
    avoidable.

    --
    Frank ess
  38. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    I've been using the ski pole idea for a few years now with a slightly
    different twist. I had an old ball head C clamp type mini tripod that I
    removed the ball and socket from and attached it to the top of the pole.
    The only advantage is that it allows using the camera in portrait mode.

    Q

    DHB wrote:

    >
    > The suggested idea of converting a ski poles into monopods is
    > great! A good friend of mine has a pair of old ski poles he was going
    > to throw away, so I will gladly take them from him & convert them.
    >
    > The down side is that the ski pole is a fixed length, yes I
    > can shorten it as needed when I convert it but it won't be collapsible
    > & extendable as many monopods are.
    >
    > On the up side:
    >
    > 1> The cost is great, often free for the poles. If you don't know a
    > skier who is upgrading ask @ a local ski/sporting store, because they
    > may get skier come in with 1 pole to match up the to another set
    > because they damaged 1 pole. After they have matched it up with a new
    > set of their likely they will likely tell the store to toss out the
    > single pole which they may save for your use.
    >
    > 2> This poles are light weight & strong.
    >
    > 3> They already have a spike on the end, a handle on top & most also
    > have a lanyard.
    >
    > There is 1 function I hope to do with a P&S with a converted
    > ski pole that might prove interesting & that is to take overhead
    > shots. Sure I can do this now with my Canon A95 thanks to it's swivel
    > 1.8" LCD screen but I am limited to my arms length. Now with it on a
    > monopod, I could get at least an extra 2 feet.
    >
    > Yes I would either need to 1st set the self 10 second timer or
    > possibly rig a mechanical remote shutter system. I'll try the self
    > timer 1st & if the added 2 or so feet prove of interest, I can
    > consider rigging 1 with some type of remote shutter system.
    >
    > Group of crowd shots from 7 to 9 feet above ground level may
    > prove to be interesting & yes I know it will place the camera @ some
    > risk but @ times I think it may be worth it.
    >
    > Thanks to everybody for all of the ideas, now I have something
    > else to try that may make for some interesting pictures. With all of
    > the very light & tiny cameras now available like the Canon SD400, I
    > would think we may be seeing more quality digital pictures being taken
    > from Radio Controlled model airplanes & helicopters.
    >
    > Respectfully, DHB
    >
    > .
    >
    > "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President,
    > or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong,
    > is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable
    > to the American public."--Theodore Roosevelt, May 7, 1918
  39. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    In article <srvda1p09rfmsg4u2enmb411f9vn05bkcq@4ax.com>,
    DHB <yoda2k@verizon.net> wrote:
    >On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 18:17:42 +0000 (UTC), ih@duck.ee.udel.edu (Charlie
    >Ih) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <BEC73A6D.8740%nobody@nowhere.com.re>,
    >>nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:
    >>>Has anybody thought of making a walking stick monopod? If so, where could I
    >>>find and buy it?
    >>>Nobody
    >>>
    >>When I was in Austria a few years ago, I bought a pair of ski/hiking
    >>poles. It is "calibrated" and adjustable. I fit it on the top with
    >>a 1/4-20 screw and covered it with a large flat plastic nut (as a safety
    >>protection). It is excellent for the three purposes. It is sturdy and
    >>strong. This is another solution in additional to the many others
    >>suggested here.
    >>
    >>Good luck!
    >>
    >>
    >
    > The suggested idea of converting a ski poles into monopods is
    >great! A good friend of mine has a pair of old ski poles he was going
    >to throw away, so I will gladly take them from him & convert them.
    >
    > The down side is that the ski pole is a fixed length, yes I
    >can shorten it as needed when I convert it but it won't be collapsible
    >& extendable as many monopods are.
    >

    The ski/hiking poles I have are collapsible and "calibrated" (you can set the
    length in cm, three sections). They also have removable rubber tips.
  40. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 20:09:43 +0000 (UTC), ih@duck.ee.udel.edu
    (Charlie Ih) wrote:
    >The ski/hiking poles I have are collapsible and "calibrated" (you can set the
    >length in cm, three sections). They also have removable rubber tips.

    Sound like Leki. The Leki Sierra Photo I have is exactly as
    you describe, already has a camera screw (hence "Photo") and
    is a really well made pole. Same pole is sold by Novoflex as
    the BBSTOCK but is finished in bright blue... the Leki is a
    more tasteful finish and is actually cheaper.

    --
    Regards

    John Bean
  41. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Actually my brand is KomperDell - antishock, made in Austria (I guess by
    an Austrian compuany). It is well made and finished and looks very nice.

    In article <mclea15cffs47kplmtpqnafuqdbqtfh87p@4ax.com>,
    John Bean <waterfoot@gmail.com> wrote:
    >On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 20:09:43 +0000 (UTC), ih@duck.ee.udel.edu
    >(Charlie Ih) wrote:
    >>The ski/hiking poles I have are collapsible and "calibrated" (you can set the
    >>length in cm, three sections). They also have removable rubber tips.
    >
    >Sound like Leki. The Leki Sierra Photo I have is exactly as
    >you describe, already has a camera screw (hence "Photo") and
    >is a really well made pole. Same pole is sold by Novoflex as
    >the BBSTOCK but is finished in bright blue... the Leki is a
    >more tasteful finish and is actually cheaper.
    >
    >--
    >Regards
    >
    >John Bean
  42. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    kashe@sonic.net wrote:
    : On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 04:42:08 +0000 (UTC), Randy Berbaum
    : <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:


    : >I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    : >same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    : >switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    : >plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    : >unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    : >hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)

    : Shouldn't both use the same 1/4 - 20 screw as the camera?

    Yes, but I was talking about the plate that attaches to the camera with
    the 1/4-20 screw and then attaches to the tripod/monopod. Each brand of
    support seems to have a different plate dimension. So the plate for my
    monopod is long and narrow while the plate for my tripod is nearly square.
    So the quick release plate for the monopod won't fit on the tripod and
    vise-versa. I guess I could get an add-on quick release that would screw
    onto the camera screw of the built-in quick relase on the tripod and
    monopod. But this would mean that on both supports I would have one quick
    release stacked on another quick release. Not the most prefferable
    situation, but I would gain the ability to quick change from one support
    to another. Unfortunately most tripods and monopods (within my budget
    range) seem to have built in quick release that can't be changed without
    sawing the top off the tripod head. :)

    I was only hopeing that there would be some standardization, even within a
    single manufacturer, between different forms of camera support that would
    allow one camera to share several supports, without having to stack quick
    release systems.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
  43. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Randy Berbaum wrote:

    >kashe@sonic.net wrote:
    >: On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 04:42:08 +0000 (UTC), Randy Berbaum
    >: <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
    >
    >
    >: >I just wish that someone would make a tripod and a monopod that uses the
    >: >same quick release head so that the same camera mounted plate could be
    >: >switched between the two "pods" at will. At this time I have one size
    >: >plate for my monopod, and a different one for my tripod. So I have to
    >: >unscrew and rescrew the plate every time I change support. At least my
    >: >hand will support the camera with either plate installed. :)
    >
    >: Shouldn't both use the same 1/4 - 20 screw as the camera?
    >
    >Yes, but I was talking about the plate that attaches to the camera with
    >the 1/4-20 screw and then attaches to the tripod/monopod. Each brand of
    >support seems to have a different plate dimension. So the plate for my
    >monopod is long and narrow while the plate for my tripod is nearly square.
    >So the quick release plate for the monopod won't fit on the tripod and
    >vise-versa. I guess I could get an add-on quick release that would screw
    >onto the camera screw of the built-in quick relase on the tripod and
    >monopod. But this would mean that on both supports I would have one quick
    >release stacked on another quick release. Not the most prefferable
    >situation, but I would gain the ability to quick change from one support
    >to another. Unfortunately most tripods and monopods (within my budget
    >range) seem to have built in quick release that can't be changed without
    >sawing the top off the tripod head. :)
    >
    >I was only hopeing that there would be some standardization, even within a
    >single manufacturer, between different forms of camera support that would
    >allow one camera to share several supports, without having to stack quick
    >release systems.

    There *is* a standard -- it's the machine screw.

    I don't know of any monopod or tripod that has a *non-removeable*
    quick release plate. Usually they don't come with quick-release plates
    at all, you have to add that. What brand/model are you talking about?

    Terry
  44. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry <no@email.invalid> wrote:

    : There *is* a standard -- it's the machine screw.

    : I don't know of any monopod or tripod that has a *non-removeable*
    : quick release plate. Usually they don't come with quick-release plates
    : at all, you have to add that. What brand/model are you talking about?

    My newest monopod is a Slik E-Z pod jr. that I purchased from B&H. The
    Quick Release is built right into the top of the pod. I suspect that I
    could figure a way to break the whole head off the pole, but then I would
    have a hollow tube to mount a new head to. I don't have my tripod infront
    of me so I can't give a make and model, but the same thing is true on it.
    the QR is built right into the pan/tilt head. I have found that unless you
    go to a professional grade support (with proffesional grade price) most
    inexpensive supports tend to have the QR built right into the head
    assembly. I tend to go with the less expensive (but still very useable)
    supports as the vast majority of my shooting is hand held and thus
    spending grocery (or rent) money to get a larger, heavier support, that I
    would use even less as I don't want to lug the thing around all day, isn't
    practicle.

    I have both a monopod and a tripod so I only have to carry the least I
    have to. If I am going out with the intention of taking lots of low light
    or panorama photos I'll lug the tripod. If I just want a little steading
    support for probable long tele shots I carry the monopod. And many days I
    am looking for more spur-of-the-moment shots, where quick reaction time is
    more important than fussing with a support system. There have been times
    around home that I would like to shoot a tripod shot, then want to unclip
    the camera to shoot people in the shade (which would benfit from the
    monopod). But the time it takes to remove one QR plate and install another
    one is the time it takes the camera shy subjects to realize I am about to
    turn around and make themselves scarce. The same QR fitting on both
    supports would allow a quicker response time to changing conditions. :)

    I guess I'll just have to go with stacked QR systems to get what I want
    (at a price I am willing to pay).

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
  45. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Randy Berbaum wrote:

    >Terry <no@email.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >: There *is* a standard -- it's the machine screw.
    >
    >: I don't know of any monopod or tripod that has a *non-removeable*
    >: quick release plate. Usually they don't come with quick-release plates
    >: at all, you have to add that. What brand/model are you talking about?
    >
    >My newest monopod is a Slik E-Z pod jr. that I purchased from B&H. The
    >Quick Release is built right into the top of the pod. I suspect that I
    >could figure a way to break the whole head off the pole, but then I would
    >have a hollow tube to mount a new head to. I don't have my tripod infront
    >of me so I can't give a make and model, but the same thing is true on it.
    >the QR is built right into the pan/tilt head. I have found that unless you
    >go to a professional grade support (with proffesional grade price) most
    >inexpensive supports tend to have the QR built right into the head
    >assembly. I tend to go with the less expensive (but still very useable)
    >supports as the vast majority of my shooting is hand held and thus
    >spending grocery (or rent) money to get a larger, heavier support, that I
    >would use even less as I don't want to lug the thing around all day, isn't
    >practicle.
    >
    >I have both a monopod and a tripod so I only have to carry the least I
    >have to. If I am going out with the intention of taking lots of low light
    >or panorama photos I'll lug the tripod. If I just want a little steading
    >support for probable long tele shots I carry the monopod. And many days I
    >am looking for more spur-of-the-moment shots, where quick reaction time is
    >more important than fussing with a support system. There have been times
    >around home that I would like to shoot a tripod shot, then want to unclip
    >the camera to shoot people in the shade (which would benfit from the
    >monopod). But the time it takes to remove one QR plate and install another
    >one is the time it takes the camera shy subjects to realize I am about to
    >turn around and make themselves scarce. The same QR fitting on both
    >supports would allow a quicker response time to changing conditions. :)
    >
    >I guess I'll just have to go with stacked QR systems to get what I want
    >(at a price I am willing to pay).
    >

    Interesting, I haven't seen monopods or tripods with these built in
    like that. I agree with you that these are foolish, exactly because
    they make it difficult to change cameras or supports. You want the
    same system to be used throughout your kit.

    However, you do not have to "go to professional grade support (with
    professional grade prices)" to get this.

    You can purchase monopods and tripods for similar money without
    built-in quick release fittings. Your e-z pod jr is about $40. The
    Slik lighty pod with ball head is $50, and the Slik Monopod 350 is
    $30, and neither has a QR plate. There are many other examples, just
    start searching B&H.

    Of course, now that you already own the equipment, it probably is
    easiest to just use a stacked QR system. Note that if you get the QR
    accessory to match one of your system, then you'll only have to stack
    on one of the tripod or monopod, not both.

    Terry
Ask a new question

Read More

Photo Cameras