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New system to be built using i7 3930k

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March 5, 2012 10:45:09 PM

Hey guys I haven't built a system in quite a while so hopefully you guys can help me out a bit. I am building this for my father who is an electrical engineer and designs schematics for intricate structures and turns them into 3d tours. I plan on going overboard if I can as I feel it extends the usefulness of the pc. I am going to try to get him to become a gamer in the process lol. Anyway this is what I have been looking at so far.

Cpu - i7 3930k $599
Cooler - Undecided(never built water cooled, only air)
Mobo - ASUS Sabertooth X79 300.99
HDD - OCZ RevoDrive RVDHY-FH-1T 1TB Hybrid SSD (not sure how this will work with this system) 329.99
GPU - Undecided but maybe something like XFX HD-687A-ZHFC Radeon HD 6870 1GB 164.99
PSU - COOLER MASTER RS-A50-SPHA-D3 Silent Pro Hybrid 1050W 249.99
Ram - CORSAIR Vengeance 32GB (8 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 199.99
Case - Undecided
Drives - Generic CD DVD burner combo

Main problem is I am already at about $1850 and he wanted to be closer to $1500, Also the build isnt complete >_>

So any suggestions around the i7 3930k would be great!

Thanks for reading and responding!

More about : system built 3930k

a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 6, 2012 12:13:46 AM

Quote:
HDD - OCZ RevoDrive RVDHY-FH-1T 1TB Hybrid SSD (not sure how this will work with this system) 329.99


Do not get a Revodrive - they're an unbelievably expensive storage gimmick that has way more room for failure and does not offer any real benefits to a small SSD / large HD combination. You can get a 128GB Crucial M4 and a 2TB Samsung Ecogreen F4 and it would be about the same price, and it's way more solid and stable:

- Crucial M4: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
- Samsung Ecogreen F4: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
Cooler - Undecided(never built water cooled, only air)


Definitely stick with air - a lot safer than water cooling and I wouldn't trust a $600 CPU to something that can leak easily. Try the Noctua D14: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
PSU - COOLER MASTER RS-A50-SPHA-D3 Silent Pro Hybrid 1050W 249.99


Go with a Seasonic X1250 instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
Case - Undecided


I'd say the Cooler Master Cosmos II but that would put the system way out of the price range. Go with a Corsair Carbide 500R:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
Main problem is I am already at about $1850 and he wanted to be closer to $1500, Also the build isnt complete >_>


Not possible with the 3930K and all the high-end equipment that you're putting in this system. If you drop it to a 3820 you'll save about $200 which can be put elsewhere.
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March 7, 2012 9:19:03 PM

Hey, thanks a lot for the info above!

Slight change of plans, I told my dad that we would have to drop to a lower processor and he ended upping his budget to 2k.

Now this is the hardware that I have found to match that range using some of your suggestions.

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thermal Compound : Arctic Silver CMQ2-2.7G Céramique 2 Tri-Linear Ceramic Thermal Compound
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case: Corsair Carbide Series 500R
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD: Crucial M4 CT128M4SSD2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: Radeon HD 6870 1GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: RAIDMAX RX-1200AE 1200W ATX12V
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Ram: CORSAIR Vengeance 32GB (8 x 4GB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mobo: Asus P9X79 Pro
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel i7-3930k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Grand Total: $1,986.21

Within his 2k budget by a hair

Anyway, Are there any problems with this build?
Also what would be my slowest component creating a bottleneck?

Thanks in advance
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a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 8, 2012 12:23:45 AM

CrossStealth said:
Hey, thanks a lot for the info above!

Slight change of plans, I told my dad that we would have to drop to a lower processor and he ended upping his budget to 2k.

Now this is the hardware that I have found to match that range using some of your suggestions.

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thermal Compound : Arctic Silver CMQ2-2.7G Céramique 2 Tri-Linear Ceramic Thermal Compound
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case: Corsair Carbide Series 500R
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD: Crucial M4 CT128M4SSD2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: Radeon HD 6870 1GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: RAIDMAX RX-1200AE 1200W ATX12V
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Ram: CORSAIR Vengeance 32GB (8 x 4GB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mobo: Asus P9X79 Pro
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel i7-3930k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Grand Total: $1,986.21

Within his 2k budget by a hair

Anyway, Are there any problems with this build?
Also what would be my slowest component creating a bottleneck?

Thanks in advance


That's way better - Raidmax PSUs are absolute crap, I do not touch or recommend anything they make, where I work we use a lot of their stuff and it falls apart really easily, if their cases are any indication, I wouldn't trust their PSUs. 1200W is way overkill for a 6870 - you could get away with way less.

You don't need the extra thermal paste - the Noctua D14 includes a really good solution so you'd be buying the same product twice.

Get this for your PSU instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'd cut down on the RAM - cut it to 16GB, you most likely will never use 32, and upgrade your GPU to a 560TI:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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March 8, 2012 1:59:41 AM

generally you want something like corsair, xfx, antec, seasonic. great one recommended by ^ and yeah 32 gb is over kill by a long shot this guy seems to hit everything on the head. ^+1
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March 8, 2012 2:30:34 AM

Ok so after a few changes


Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case: Rosewill BLACKHAWK-ULTRA Gaming Super Tower
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD: Crucial M4 CT128M4SSD2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: GeForce GTX 560 Ti
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: CORSAIR Professional Series HX850 (CMPSU-850HX) 850W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Ram: CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mobo: Asus P9X79 Pro
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel i7-3930k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


So I changed the Case Ram GPU and PSU

Everything looking good now? Also what would be my bottleneck?
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March 8, 2012 1:17:08 PM

You said this build was for your Dad. Since your Dad and I are probably around the same age, I'll make a few suggestions and you'll have to figure out if they apply.

I am making the assumption that you want to impress your Dad with a system he will find very useful for his work.

Also, think of your Dad as a client that "hired" you as a consultant to build him a system. The first step a good consultant takes is talk to the client to clearly determine what the needs are and, tailor a system that fits those needs within the allowed budget. It is your first consulting job, obviously you are making every effort possible to get it right, make sure you get your "client" involved in the decision making process which in turn will allow you to make the best decisions for him.

1. You should ask your Dad if the program he uses, uses a lot of memory. Most programs that do rendering use all the memory they can get. The 32GB you had originally spec-ed may be quite welcome for such a program. I know of some programs that would be quite happy with 64GB and even more. Your Dad can tell you if the program he uses is in that category.

2. You mentioned you would try to turn your Dad into a gamer. Even if he becomes a gamer, he might like a case a little less flashy (for him the computer is a professional tool, if he had to invite professional coworkers/bosses for a demo, some may view a flashy case as "unprofessional".) I suggest you show him some of the more tame Lian-Lis just in case. In other words, find out what style of case he would like to have.

3. Since he is not a gamer yet, I think the original Radeon you spec-ed was a good choice. If he gets the gaming bug then he can "justify" purchasing a more powerful card at that time. If he doesn't, the money didn't get spent on something he doesn't use to its fullest.

4. Given that he probably think of this computer as a work tool, he would likely prefer reliability and stability over anything else. The ASUS P9X79 Pro has some nice features (such as disk caching using SSDs) but, it is not without its quirks. Your Dad might prefer (or be more comfortable) with the Intel DX79SI, not quite as full featured but definitely a workhorse, reliable, stable and yes, boring (but in this case, that might be very good.)

I think you've got a nice system spec-ed out but you should consult your Dad to ensure the choices concerning the amount of memory, case style, motherboard and video card are actually the best ones for the work he does. For everything else, I think you're pretty much right on the money ;-)

HTH


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March 8, 2012 3:41:10 PM

Check this build out, for the CPU cooler I would put a CM Hyper 212 EVO http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... unless you plan on doing some overclocking, then go with the Noctua.

The Kingwin PSU is currently on newegg for a freaking STEAL, regardless on if you need 1000W or not, for $189 that is a MUST buy. Listed price is $229 with 20% discount before 3/11!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Part list permalink: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/5vxl
Part price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/5vxl/by_merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($599.98 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth X79 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($325.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($88.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($105.86 @ Mac Connection)
Hard Drive: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($152.99 @ Adorama)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 6870 1GB Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair CC600TM ATX Mid Tower Case ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Kingwin 1000W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1893.77
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated 2012-03-08 12:35 EST-0500)
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March 8, 2012 3:51:53 PM

Factor in $35 bucks for the Hyper 212 EVO and you are looking at a $1,928 budget. You get some increased storage and a great, well built PSU. One thing I usually never skimp on are the "CORE" components. I think the Sabertooth is a great user friendly board for experienced or novice builders and it fills the role of a workstation board or a gaming board.
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a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 8, 2012 5:26:00 PM

CrossStealth said:
Ok so after a few changes


Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case: Rosewill BLACKHAWK-ULTRA Gaming Super Tower
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD: Crucial M4 CT128M4SSD2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: GeForce GTX 560 Ti
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: CORSAIR Professional Series HX850 (CMPSU-850HX) 850W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Ram: CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mobo: Asus P9X79 Pro
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel i7-3930k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


So I changed the Case Ram GPU and PSU

Everything looking good now? Also what would be my bottleneck?


There's nothing I can see that would be a bottleneck - that will be a killer system.

Quote:
2. You mentioned you would try to turn your Dad into a gamer. Even if he becomes a gamer, he might like a case a little less flashy (for him the computer is a professional tool, if he had to invite professional coworkers/bosses for a demo, some may view a flashy case as "unprofessional".) I suggest you show him some of the more tame Lian-Lis just in case. In other words, find out what style of case he would like to have.


I usually choose the Carbide because it's a really simple design on the outside and the interior has room for tons of drives, the biggest coolers, the biggest video cards and PSUs, you name it. Plus the cases are solidly built and last forever. I don't like cases with lots of "bling" and they're usually from junk manufacturers like Raidmax, Apevia, Xion, Xclio, HEC, Compucase, you name it. I'd rather go with simple yet elegant for the case design, rather than flashy and likely to fall apart.

Quote:
3. Since he is not a gamer yet, I think the original Radeon you spec-ed was a good choice. If he gets the gaming bug then he can "justify" purchasing a more powerful card at that time. If he doesn't, the money didn't get spent on something he doesn't use to its fullest.


Yeah that's why I didn't recommend a Radeon 7970 yet - even get the 7870 when / if you decide to upgrade as that would be quite a nice upgrade.

Quote:
4. Given that he probably think of this computer as a work tool, he would likely prefer reliability and stability over anything else. The ASUS P9X79 Pro has some nice features (such as disk caching using SSDs) but, it is not without its quirks. Your Dad might prefer (or be more comfortable) with the Intel DX79SI, not quite as full featured but definitely a workhorse, reliable, stable and yes, boring (but in this case, that might be very good.)


That's a good choice - the Intel boards are very bland on features (lack things like UEFI, higher RAM speeds, etc) but the biggest plus is that they have unbelievable longevity. I'd stick with the Sabertooth - it's better than the awful P67 design and it's a good halfway point between a workstation board and a gaming board.

Quote:
Factor in $35 bucks for the Hyper 212 EVO and you are looking at a $1,928 budget. You get some increased storage and a great, well built PSU. One thing I usually never skimp on are the "CORE" components.


I don't either but the Noctua D14 will give you a higher clock ratio than an EVO will - with the D14 you'll be able to unlock all cores on the 3930K and take it beyond 4.5.
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