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Gaming Rig, will it work?

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March 7, 2012 1:04:55 AM

I am building my first custom PC. I have been researching for weeks so I'm pretty confident in my knowledge with building this PC. I do want to know however if all of these parts that are listed below will work together. Please let me know. Also, I was wondering if this power supply would be enough? If not, what should I get? Thanks.

My system:
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922

MOBO: ASUS P8Z68-V LE LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

PSU: CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 650W ATX12V v2.31

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive

DVD/CD Drive: LITE-ON Internal 24x DVD-Writer Black SATA Model iHAS324-99

GPU: GIGABYTE GV-N570OC-13I Rev2.0 GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support

RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000

And a Wifi PCI Express Card: Rosewill RNX-N250PCe (RNWD-11005) PCI Express 150/300Mbps 2T2R Wireless Adapter

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March 7, 2012 1:15:27 AM

Thats a really great build. The only thing i would change is the graphics card. I recommend evga for a brand. The come with great warrenty's and a few nice programs, like there step up program which lets to upgrade to any card with in 30 days and just pay the difference. Also they will mail you a new card to use if anything happens to yours while they look into your isssue.

The 650w PSU if fine aslong as your not doing SLI. If you are pick yourself up a TX850w.

If you want a nice set of RAM to match your board take a look at the kingston hyper x. Looks great on the ASUS boards. Whatever you get just make sure you dont get any heatsinks on the RAM. They dont fit with the aftermarket coolers

Plus dont forget your cpu cooler. Pick up the hyper 212 for $30.
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March 7, 2012 1:35:47 AM

neal0790 said:
Thats a really great build. The only thing i would change is the graphics card. I recommend evga for a brand. The come with great warrenty's and a few nice programs, like there step up program which lets to upgrade to any card with in 30 days and just pay the difference. Also they will mail you a new card to use if anything happens to yours while they look into your isssue.

The 650w PSU if fine aslong as your not doing SLI. If you are pick yourself up a TX850w.

If you want a nice set of RAM to match your board take a look at the kingston hyper x. Looks great on the ASUS boards. Whatever you get just make sure you dont get any heatsinks on the RAM. They dont fit with the aftermarket coolers

Plus dont forget your cpu cooler. Pick up the hyper 212 for $30.

Thanks! I swapped out the RAM to (CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model)

Regarding the GPU, I was looking at the Gigabyte because apparently it is already factory OC'ed? It also has great reviews and a great price. What do you think?

I also added the aftermarket CPU cooler. Thanks!
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March 7, 2012 1:52:22 AM

thomthoms3 said:
Thanks! I swapped out the RAM to (CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model)

Regarding the GPU, I was looking at the Gigabyte because apparently it is already factory OC'ed? It also has great reviews and a great price. What do you think?

I also added the aftermarket CPU cooler. Thanks!



Basically what your doing is paying for convenience. The company does the work and finds a semi decent O/C for that GPU.
What you can do and what I recommend is buying a Stock card from lets say Evga (limited Lifetime) or XFX(Double Lifetime Gurantee[Can sell the card and the lifetime warranty x-fers]). Flash the gpu bios from one of there higher end.

Example: Evga has there GTX models as OC/SOC/FTW etc;

google the the bios flash it into your GPU and your good to go. Remember those Overclocks can be the limit of your card or you can have so much more potential. Each GPU is not created equal.

Or do it the old fashion way Buy the Stock GPUand find your own custom clock. (MSI AfterBurner)
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March 7, 2012 1:55:29 AM

Cloudz00x said:
Basically what your doing is paying for convenience. The company does the work and finds a semi decent O/C for that GPU.
What you can do and what I recommend is buying a Stock card from lets say Evga (limited Lifetime) or XFX(Double Lifetime Gurantee[Can sell the card and the lifetime warranty x-fers]). Flash the gpu bios from one of there higher end.

Example: Evga has there GTX models as OC/SOC/FTW etc;

google the the bios flash it into your GPU and your good to go. Remember those Overclocks can be the limit of your card or you can have so much more potential. Each GPU is not created equal.

Or do it the old fashion way Buy the Stock GPUand find your own custom clock. (MSI AfterBurner)

Thanks for the reply, I honestly do not know how to do that. I'm sure I could figure it out (eventually) but even that, I'm afraid that I could mess something up. Any suggestions?
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March 7, 2012 2:03:21 AM

It really depends on the card with the OC potential, some cards are great while others cant handle it. I bought a SC card because it was the same price as a factory one at the time. They give you a program with evga called evga percision, and its as easy as sliding a bar to overclock it. You really cant mess anything up aslong as your dont go over the SC settings if you dont really know what your doing. You can just go online see what the SC settings are slide the bar over and hit apply. Thats all there is to it.
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March 7, 2012 2:08:44 AM

thomthoms3 said:
Thanks for the reply, I honestly do not know how to do that. I'm sure I could figure it out (eventually) but even that, I'm afraid that I could mess something up. Any suggestions?



When you purchase the GPu. Just Read what others have attain via Overclock On Air Cooling. You can then work around from there. Honestly Took me a good day to find a 100% stable/folding on my gtx 570's.

Example my cards dont wanna hit 900 core clock whatsoever. Even hitting 1.1v didnt do the trick. I got some decent cards for O/C but was crap for trying to hit the 900 mark. Again it all comes down to research and then testing OCCT is a good program to stress test the cards for at errors and to check the idle/full load temps.

Running TRI-Sli GTX 570's at 1.088 875/1750/2100. Full Load Stable doesn't go above 58c on air cool
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March 7, 2012 2:11:59 AM

neal0790 said:
It really depends on the card with the OC potential, some cards are great while others cant handle it. I bought a SC card because it was the same price as a factory one at the time. They give you a program with evga called evga percision, and its as easy as sliding a bar to overclock it. You really cant mess anything up aslong as your dont go over the SC settings if you dont really know what your doing. You can just go online see what the SC settings are slide the bar over and hit apply. Thats all there is to it.

Okay so what card would you suggest if I were to overclock it myself? Also, if I just wanted to OC my GPU, would I have to buy/change anything else or just overclock it and be done? Sorry for the lack of knowledge in the matter, I just really don't want to mess up a $300 GPU. Thanks.
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March 7, 2012 2:27:00 AM

Again it comes down to convenience. If you don't have faith in your self get a overclocked version of the card you want. At-least you know it has been overclocked and has some le-way to be overclocked some more.

If you wish to learn and save money, buy a stock and overclock it yourself. 99% of the time if you buy a stock GPU you can overclock it to the Next model which is there version of the overclock.

Again as me and neal both said Video cards maybe created the same but the limits that the card can handle are not. Sometimes you get a card that just wont overclock. Other times your very lucky and the overclock capability of the card is outstanding.

BTW your GTX 570 is an outstanding card. I have a GTX 570 myself as I said above. The card itself is great and alot of people have overclocked it including myself. The capabilities of that card for O/C is jsut grea, which is almost universal for all gtx 570 cards. Just sometimes you may or may not be the person that gets the dud and has to live with standard clocks.
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March 7, 2012 2:47:11 AM

Cloudz00x said:
Again it comes down to convenience. If you don't have faith in your self get a overclocked version of the card you want. At-least you know it has been overclocked and has some le-way to be overclocked some more.

If you wish to learn and save money, buy a stock and overclock it yourself. 99% of the time if you buy a stock GPU you can overclock it to the Next model which is there version of the overclock.

Again as me and neal both said Video cards maybe created the same but the limits that the card can handle are not. Sometimes you get a card that just wont overclock. Other times your very lucky and the overclock capability of the card is outstanding.

BTW your GTX 570 is an outstanding card. I have a GTX 570 myself as I said above. The card itself is great and alot of people have overclocked it including myself. The capabilities of that card for O/C is jsut grea, which is almost universal for all gtx 570 cards. Just sometimes you may or may not be the person that gets the dud and has to live with standard clocks.


Exactly what cloud said. Its not hard to do it yourself. If your unsure just buy a OC card, i just wouldnt spend more than $10. I would just recommend buying a 570 go online, look at the super clock speeds of the card and set it exactly to what the SC settings are. You will be safe and still get a SC card. Once you do that you will realize how easy it is and can adjust it from there once you get a hang of it. Evga gives you programs to make it easy. They will let you test it and even tell you if its stable or unstable. Either way the 570 is a great card, i used one and loved it. The only reason i brought it back is because i traded in a few games at microcenter and got way more than i planned. So i used it to grab myself a 580 and upgrade my power supply. Plus im a sucker for 60fps in bf3 with everything maxed out, lol.
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March 7, 2012 11:05:06 AM

Thanks for all your responses. I think I will buy a stock GTX 570 and OC it myself to the SC level. What card would you recommend to do this? EVGA?
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March 7, 2012 4:40:39 PM

Yeah i recommend evga cards, mostly for the warranty it comes with and the costumer support you get like i said in my first post. I got one and have no complaints at all.
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March 7, 2012 6:06:14 PM

Best answer selected by thomthoms3.
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