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NO POST SCREEN ON NEW BUILD

Last response: in Systems
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March 7, 2012 11:52:08 PM



Hello, I am a new computer builder and have just recently assembled it,but alas I have no post screen!

It is not the monitor it is brand new and I also tried it on my TV, again it had no signal.

Specs:ASUS M4A87TD/USB3 Motherboard that lights up with a green light.

CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 Power Supply, fan spins and it look like it supplies power to all items.

Rosewill RNX-N300X IEEE LAN CARD, it lights up so I know it works.

LG DVD Burner 24X DVD+R 8X Opitical Drive lights up but does not open when pressed.

Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB 7200 RPM Hard Drive, don't know if it works, no Post remember?

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 Ram, don't know if it works but it does say my motherboard accepts all memory.

AMD Phenom II X4 960T Zosma CPU, heatsink spins but I don't know if the CPU works.

SAPPHIRE 100314-3L Radeon HD 6870 Graphics Card The fan spins but the HDMI and VGA connect both show no post.

COOLER MASTER RC-692-KKN2 CM690 II Case, All fans spin

HELP I DON'T KNOW WHAT'S WRONG! =(

More about : post screen build

March 8, 2012 12:13:42 AM

Does a light on the motherboard mean it works?
Do I even need a post? If I get my optical drive to open can I just pop in WIN 7?
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March 8, 2012 12:33:24 AM

Yes you need to be able to post to install windows.

Things that have caused this for me in the past:

4 pin CPU power connector not connected(check this)

No power connector attached to graphics card(check this)

RAM not clicked in all the way(make sure each snap in plastic bit is firmly secured)

CPU heatsink insecurely mounted(not enough contact with CPU to prevent overheating, see if the heat sink has any wobble to it, if it feels tight it's probably making good contact)
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March 8, 2012 12:38:10 AM

If everything checks out but it still wont go past the initial power on, you probably have a bad component. Any component can be bad, even a brand new one. Most likely with what your describing if a component was bad it would be the CPU most likely, followed by the motherboard(next most likely), graphics card, or even the PSU could have some problem.

If you can't get it working you can take it to Best Buy and have them "diagnose" the problem for free. They have equipment for testing your power supply and other components.
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March 8, 2012 12:50:41 AM

subcutaneous said:
Yes you need to be able to post to install windows.

Things that have caused this for me in the past:

4 pin CPU power connector not connected(check this)

No power connector attached to graphics card(check this)

RAM not clicked in all the way(make sure each snap in plastic bit is firmly secured)

CPU heatsink insecurely mounted(not enough contact with CPU to prevent overheating, see if the heat sink has any wobble to it, if it feels tight it's probably making good contact)





4 Pin (Check)
2 PCI-E (Check)
RAM (good)
Cpu heatsink (good)


As a first time builder I cannot help but feel I did something wrong, but I quadrupled check and it seems okay.
If my parts really are DOA can I send my CPU back with the thermal paste on it? And could still be the motherboard, even with the light that it is receiving power is on? Can I test my parts myself?

I really don't want the Geeksquad at best buy touching my parts ..... if it comes that to I guess.

Thanks.
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March 8, 2012 3:07:19 AM

Ok this is the problem happend to me as well. some parts of your computer is faulty.
Return the ram saying its faulty and demand a new 1 test if that works.
If not then check your cpu if its faulty.
if not then graphic card.

Because the computer does a system check. So therefore it checks the ram then cpu then graphic card.

So check those components.
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March 8, 2012 3:36:55 AM

Wow, I just had this problem like 45mins ago. Turns out that my monitor was set on analog input instead of digital*face palm*. That's the only other thing I could think of than cables not being fully plugged in or faulty components. Hopefully nothing bad with your CPU.
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March 8, 2012 3:53:12 AM

First:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...
to check that you did not overlook something simple.

Second:
Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

Third:
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. At this point, if you do not have a system (internal case) speaker, you really need one.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps, LED's, or fan activity:

Check for line power at the PSU input. Extension cords, power strips, and power cords do fail.

If you have power and no beeps, suspect components in likely order are PSU, motherboard, and CPU.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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March 8, 2012 9:18:45 AM

In addition to JSC's suggestions above (which are very good) I suggest you follow these steps:

1. Unplug everything from the motherboard except, power supply, CPU, heatsink, memory, video card and monitor, also unplug all unnecessary connections to the case with the exception of the power switch. In other words, leave the absolute minimum necessary to get the motherboard to post. Then try to post. (I'd suggest that if you have already installed everything in the case and it doesn't post, get the motherboard out of the case, place it on a non-conducive surface (anything made of plastic will do) and repeat step 1. (this step.) (In other words, you want to know if the motherboard will post outside the case.) You can simulate the ON/OFF switch from the case by shorting the two power pins using a screwdriver. Refer to your motherboard's manual to identify them, they are often identified on the MB itself as well (usually as pwr or power.)

2.1 if you successfully post-ed in 1. above then start adding back one component at a time until there is one that prevents the MB from posting (don't put the MB back into the case until you've tested every component.)
(if you can add everything back without any problems then make sure nothing is causing a short when you reinstall the motherboard in the case - since that may have been the cause of the original problem.)

2.2 This one is very HELPFUL: if the motherboard did NOT post in step 1. then REMOVE the memory from the motherboard (leave everything else connected, that is, power supply, CPU, heatsink, video card and monitor) then try to make the motherboard post _without_ memory (that is turn the power on.) At this point, you know it should NOT post (since the memory is missing) BUT, if the motherboard works properly you should hear a repeated long beep. (Most motherboards - though not all - now have a built-in piezoelectric speaker.) This is an indirect way of finding out if your motherboard is dead. If you remove the memory and the motherboard does _not_ beep then chances are good the MB is dead. If the motherboard complains bitterly that the memory is missing (by issuing a series of long and loud beeps) then you know the motherboard is not dead (though it could still have other problems.) Obviously, you'd like to hear your motherboard beep. If it doesn't, it is pretty much guaranteed that "she is dead, Jim".

The results of this simple experiment will determine what the next step should be.

HTH.
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March 9, 2012 1:59:20 AM

Wow, thanks to everyone for the help, I know these "OMG no POST!" topics are a dime a dozen. Thanks for leaving such a detailed response and actually helping. =)

I have went down the check list and finally decided to remove everything, buy a motherboard speaker and check for post beeps on a breadboard build.


WAIT! One more question, where could I buy a motherboard speaker in a retail store? Such as Best Buy, Radio Shack, J&R in NYC or some other place. I really don't want to wait another week in shipping, I have already gone through 2 DOA PSU's
(thanks Newegg) and I am sick of waiting.
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March 9, 2012 2:10:27 AM

I would "borrow" the speaker in your coolermaster case (or any other old case)

I'd be a bit surprised if your motherboard did not include a piezoelectric speaker. Google piezoelectric speaker, that will give you a picture of what you need to find on your motherboard (it looks black, round, about the size of a dime to a quarter depending on model, though it could even be smaller than that.)

Unfortunately motherboard manufacturers consider it a "non feature" and don't even list it in the specs (like they don't list there are pins for reset and hdd leds)

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March 9, 2012 2:49:12 AM

eassing said:
One more question, where could I buy a motherboard speaker in a retail store?


I'd shoot an email to ASUS asking them if the motherboard you have has a built in speaker or not.

If they say yes you are all set, otherwise I'd go to a computer recycling outfit and/or ask friend if they have an old computer they don't use (and swipe the speaker from the case ;)  )
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March 11, 2012 4:42:12 PM

Hey guys just wanted to do an update post thanks again.

So I took everything out of my case except I left the motherboard mounted in the case and installed the motherboard speaker to hear the POST beeps and also kept my case switch plugged in to turn on the motherboard. (Don't know how to short the pins.) I then just tried to turn it on (PSU is a 90$ Corsair I am 100% it is not broken 650W) and the heatsink fan spin and so does the PSU fan but no beep!

Do I blame the motherboard or CPU?
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March 11, 2012 5:12:36 PM

eassing said:
Hey guys just wanted to do an update post thanks again.

So I took everything out of my case except I left the motherboard mounted in the case and installed the motherboard speaker to hear the POST beeps and also kept my case switch plugged in to turn on the motherboard. (Don't know how to short the pins.) I then just tried to turn it on (PSU is a 90$ Corsair I am 100% it is not broken 650W) and the heatsink fan spin and so does the PSU fan but no beep!

Do I blame the motherboard or CPU?



If your speaker is installed correctly (big caveat) and you don't get any beeps at all then the motherboard is dead.

If you have any doubts about the speaker, I'd reverse the speaker connection (I don't think it matters but just in case) and try again.

Also, as I suggested earlier, remove the memory from the motherboard and try to post. If there are no beeps then you can be sure the MB is dead (provided the speaker is working properly ;)  )
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March 12, 2012 1:44:03 AM

Getting ready to send in my motherboard..... Couple of questions, when I uninstall the CPU where do I store it? In a plastic bag or something? I do not want the pins to get bent. And my stock heat sink came with a square of thermal paste which is probably all over my CPU now. So when putting it into my new motherboard do I leave the old thermal paste on it and re install the heat sink or do I completely wipe off the old thermal paste and apply a new coat?
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March 12, 2012 6:12:08 AM

if you have a piece of styrofoam laying around, I'd stick the cpu into it (put the piece of styrofoam on a flat solid surface and press the cpu pin into it by apply steady and even pressure on the CPU until you feel the pins sinking into the styrofoam.)

If you don't have a piece of styrofoam laying around, stop by any hardware store, they usually have plenty meant to be discarded. A quarter each thickness is pretty close to ideal but thicker won't hurt anything.

As you've figured already, you will need to get new thermal paste. You could use the paste that is stuck on the CPU but I don't recommend that. A tube of thermal paste is not very expensive. Of course, that means you should wipe off the old paste before you put the new one.

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