Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Reference model vs Factory Overclocked Edition

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
January 5, 2012 9:50:55 AM

hello,
I am planning to buy a gtx 560 ti for my new setup.
But I wanted to know this -

Is there much difference b/w the cooling arrangement of the base model and the facory overclocked model???
Is it justifiable if I have to get 10$ or more for this difference??

I was looking at ZOTAC and GIGABYTE models and comparing their prices. The difference is 20$ at most acc. to my requirement.

Thx in advance!
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 10:23:06 AM

If you plan overclocking both of them more, it is OK to get a stock clock graphic cards.
Score
0
a c 291 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 10:30:28 AM

Yea, stock clock is okay as long as you're planning to overclock it yourself, but you should make sure it's not stock cooler, but an aftermarket one.
Score
0
Related resources
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 10:34:01 AM

That's true, when you have, let's say twin frozer II and twin frozer II OC. You would choose twin frozer II non overclock version to save more money. Just make sure it doesn't have reference cooler so the conclusion is if you are going to overclock it yourself, better save more money and get non overclock version of an aftermarket cooler GPU.
Score
0
January 5, 2012 12:44:28 PM

I thought we could only get aftermarket coolers for CPUs??

How wud I install an aftermrkt cooler on a GPU? its already closed up and sealed in.
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 12:52:17 PM

No, we mean coolers like twin frozer, direct CU, IceQ, Double D, etc.
Score
0
a c 291 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 1:38:45 PM

When you buy the card, those aftermarket coolers are already installed. Those cards are sold with the coolers attached.
Score
0
January 5, 2012 3:39:55 PM

refillable said:
No, we mean coolers like twin frozer, direct CU, IceQ, Double D, etc.


u mean to imply that these coolers are added later? I understand that they tweak/modify the reference model in terms of cooling and other physical factors. but that is not my concern. I know that if I get msi, then i'll be getting a twin frozr Ii or a direct CU with Asus, etc.

My ques. is comparing two models of the same GPu of the same manufacturer, which look alike (which means they have similar cooling solutions) but have different clock speeds.

Coz i was comparing gigabyte 560 ti models, namely the super clocked versions with the ultra durable VGA versions. they looked pretty much same to me.
Same is the case with zotac's 560 ti's.

please correct me if i am wrong. :kaola: 


Score
0
a c 291 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 3:57:23 PM

If you mean it that way, reference models are usually cheaper, and hold same overclocking capabilities as overclocked ones.

The only drawback if by chance you are unable you overclock the reference card to factory overclock speeds, you can't do anything about but, but if overclocked card fails to perform at those speeds, you can call the warranty.
Score
0

Best solution

a c 175 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 4:13:33 PM

It's OK to get gigabyte 560 ti, if you are going to overclock it yourself you be better with the non factory overclock because they hold the same overclocking ability. Why I say getting the non overclocked version is better is because it is cheaper and the money you save you can use it for other useful things.

Hope this helps and good luck :) .
Share
January 5, 2012 4:36:37 PM

thx, so gonna get the non-overclocked version. Well, dual fans on a card should help me to OC just upto 10% at least right?
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 5, 2012 4:54:00 PM

Technically yes. But not actually, because they are all based in the same GPU core. But the thing is why I said technically said is because you can overclock without worrying of overheating. Which means you can go with better clocks and more voltage :) .
Score
0
January 5, 2012 10:54:46 PM

refillable said:
Technically yes. But not actually, because they are all based in the same GPU core. But the thing is why I said technically said is because you can overclock without worrying of overheating. Which means you can go with better clocks and more voltage :) .


I didnt understand you.
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 6, 2012 3:49:33 AM

:lol: 

That mean's the aftermarket coolers will run cooler when both overclocked and stock than the reference cooler :) .
Score
0
January 6, 2012 8:27:48 AM

yeah, like the msi's cooler should be better than nVidia's reference cooler. k.
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 6, 2012 9:20:23 AM

Yes it is, you get the idea now, good :) .
Score
0
January 6, 2012 12:43:38 PM

actually, I had the idea all along. i was just thinking that u were implying something entirely different.
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 6, 2012 12:58:36 PM

:lol:  good luck on getting your GPU anyways :) .
Score
0
a b U Graphics card
January 6, 2012 1:29:16 PM

I was thinking about getting one of these for my 6990. They have them for multiple cards from AMD and Nvidia.

http://www.arctic.ac/en/p/cooling/vga/375/accelero-twin...

It is supposed to run the card 20 degrees cooler but it cost $140 for my model. Any card that I have overclocked hasn't run any hotter than the reference model it just meant that the fan had to spin a lot faster to acheive the same temperature which could get really annoying depending on the card. Once the blower on my 6990 passes 45% it starts to get louder than the rest if my fans and at 60% it sounds like a dyson.
Score
0
January 7, 2012 6:20:37 AM

refillable said:
:lol:  good luck on getting your GPU anyways :) .



thanx.
And i wont be buying a separate aftrmrkt cooler anyway. Just gonna stick with what gigabyte/zotac gives me. :D  Its not worth screwing around for 5-7 fps. :sol: 
Score
0
a c 175 U Graphics card
January 7, 2012 6:45:14 AM

:) 
Score
0
January 7, 2012 10:16:06 AM

Best answer selected by gam0reily.
Score
0
!