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BSOD Still Happening

Last response: in Systems
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March 9, 2012 12:58:32 AM

Well I'm getting BSOD, and I took it to a repair shop and he said he tried everything. From installing a new driver to reinstalling Windows 7, and he thinks my motherboard isn't co-op with my other hardware.

My specs are:
-2 Nvidia 580
-Intel DB67BG
-2 Corsair Dominator
-Intel 2600k

Is he right? If not what can I do to stop this BSOD? It only happens when I shut it off. Please help :(  I am getting sick of these BSOD.

More about : bsod happening

March 9, 2012 1:46:59 AM

pattonrommel said:
It only happens when I shut it off.


Just to make sure I understood your post correctly:

You only get the BSOD when you shutdown Windows. Is this correct ?

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March 9, 2012 2:27:31 AM

440bx said:
Just to make sure I understood your post correctly:

You only get the BSOD when you shutdown Windows. Is this correct ?

Yup when restarts and yeah shut down.
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March 9, 2012 2:32:45 AM

Most likely a software issue. I doubt the motherboard is at fault (it's possible but very unlikely because if it were defective, you'd very likely get the BSODs on other occasions as well.)

What software (including drivers) are installed that did not come with Windows ?

Do you experience the problem if you start Windows in safe mode and then shut down ?

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March 19, 2012 2:42:06 AM

440bx said:
Most likely a software issue. I doubt the motherboard is at fault (it's possible but very unlikely because if it were defective, you'd very likely get the BSODs on other occasions as well.)

What software (including drivers) are installed that did not come with Windows ?

Do you experience the problem if you start Windows in safe mode and then shut down ?

I still have to try the safe mode shut down, but I have Bigfoot Network driver, Logitech C910, Soundblaster X-Fi, EVGA Nvidia, Lightscribe, and that's all I can remember. Also is that what you mean by driver? I also have Norton if you needed to know that, AND NORTON IS A VERY GOOD PRODUCT. lol
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March 19, 2012 3:00:03 AM

What is a driver?
In general term for a software component used to interact with hardware devices.
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March 19, 2012 5:05:00 AM

To give you an example of what a driver is (in addition to what ageXXXXX above said, which is correct), your X-Fi sound card (as an example) requires some software to be installed with it, one of the software components installed is the driver for it. As agexxxxx above stated, the driver is the part that allows Windows to communicate with the X-Fi hardware without it, Windows would not know how to make it work.

Every piece of hardware in your computer has a related driver. Some drivers come with Windows, many others have to be installed using the disc provided by the hardware manufacturer.

It is very common that, if a driver is "defective" (has bugs, which is far from unheard of) then the machine will behave erratically and very often will simply BSOD.

It is for this reason that I normally recommend either updating all the drivers to WHQL versions (WHQL drivers are drivers that have been tested and validated by Microsoft) or, if that is not possible (there aren't always WHQL drivers available) then temporarily remove the hardware that does not have a WHQL driver available for it.

If the machine still misbehaves after installing all WHQL drivers then, I remove all the hardware except for the absolute minimum needed for the machine to boot. That is, the minimum memory, built-in video only (if available) and the CPU. If the machine works in this "minimal" configuration then it indicates that one of the pieces of hardware that has been removed is causing the problem. By re-adding each piece separately and testing, it should be possible to determine which one is the cause.

For now, your next step should be to try Safe Mode. Find out if the machine misbehaves in safe mode.
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March 23, 2012 11:57:25 PM

440bx said:
To give you an example of what a driver is (in addition to what ageXXXXX above said, which is correct), your X-Fi sound card (as an example) requires some software to be installed with it, one of the software components installed is the driver for it. As agexxxxx above stated, the driver is the part that allows Windows to communicate with the X-Fi hardware without it, Windows would not know how to make it work.

Every piece of hardware in your computer has a related driver. Some drivers come with Windows, many others have to be installed using the disc provided by the hardware manufacturer.

It is very common that, if a driver is "defective" (has bugs, which is far from unheard of) then the machine will behave erratically and very often will simply BSOD.

It is for this reason that I normally recommend either updating all the drivers to WHQL versions (WHQL drivers are drivers that have been tested and validated by Microsoft) or, if that is not possible (there aren't always WHQL drivers available) then temporarily remove the hardware that does not have a WHQL driver available for it.

If the machine still misbehaves after installing all WHQL drivers then, I remove all the hardware except for the absolute minimum needed for the machine to boot. That is, the minimum memory, built-in video only (if available) and the CPU. If the machine works in this "minimal" configuration then it indicates that one of the pieces of hardware that has been removed is causing the problem. By re-adding each piece separately and testing, it should be possible to determine which one is the cause.

For now, your next step should be to try Safe Mode. Find out if the machine misbehaves in safe mode.

Okay thanks, but I trie dthe safe mode it's fine; when I tried to shut it down it wouldn't it just froze.
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