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How often do you do a complete rebuild or substantial upgrade?

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March 9, 2012 3:30:40 AM

I was wondering how often the people here do a complete rebuild, or a substantial upgrade.
Substantial being new Mobo and CPU (along those lines).
March 9, 2012 3:38:36 AM

5years. Build the best you can, and make it last 5 years.
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March 9, 2012 3:41:14 AM

I rebuild or upgrade once a year it's my Christmas present to myself.
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March 9, 2012 4:08:10 AM

bryonhowley said:
I rebuild or upgrade once a year it's my Christmas present to myself.


I think you were on the Naughty list if Santa brought you an AMD CPU.
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March 9, 2012 4:22:16 AM

Agree with dadof1hunter!
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March 9, 2012 4:23:22 AM

dadof1hunter said:
5years. Build the best you can, and make it last 5 years.


See the problem (if you could called that) is the amount spent could be used to make a new build every year or two.
Top of the line 5 years ago isn't very close to the low end now. I think in 2007 (5 years ago) the "fast" Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700 was like the i7 is now. Here you can see it is theoretically much slower then an i3-2100:

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu_lookup.php?cpu=Intel+Core2+...

The 8800 GTX was considered the best high end card in 2007 on Tom's Hardware:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-video-cards-...

$540 for that card it seems. But it seems to be beaten out by a $120 6850:
http://www.hwcompare.com/5974/geforce-8800-gtx-vs-radeo...

It seems that from a budget perspective building a middle of the road PC (more than $500, less than $1000)
every year or two would beat out buying top of the line for 5 years.

Granted my age probably plays a part in my general shortsightedness, as well as previously making money
off of buying and reselling used electronics. :lol: 

This also isn't counting that every complete rebuild you could resell your previous build for probably around 25% less
then when you built a year ago.
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March 9, 2012 4:33:47 AM

dadof1hunter said:
I think you were on the Naughty list if Santa brought you an AMD CPU.


:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 

I'd say I buy one part at a time when I need it, most parts like CD drives, HDs, cases, things like that you really only need to buy once. I upgrade the motherboard / CPU every two years and I upgrade everything else as needed (GPU, etc).
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March 9, 2012 4:36:15 AM

Middle end cpu's last about 3-5 years, meaning your motherboard will last 3-5 years or more if there is a good upgrade path. Over clocking is important for this. A middle end gpu will last up to 3 years if your willing to play at 720p towards the end of its life from my experience. Overclocking is also helpful, in the case of the hd 5000 series and 6000 series you can get a good 20% overclock to scales linearly with performance. Some HD 7000 series can gain a 40% overclock, this seems to be the case with the 7850. I have not overclocked nvidia gpu's besides the 250 gts so I don't have much background there. When i say middle end for cpu I saying something like a phenom ii x6 or i5. GPU's are like HD 6870 or 560 ti. There is also a bit of personal prefence, for example some people only want 60 fps+ and others 30 fps+. Your going to have to descide what you want.
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March 9, 2012 4:41:06 AM

Phyrexiancure said:
Middle end cpu's last about 3-5 years, meaning your motherboard will last 3-5 years. Over clocking is important for this. A middle end gpu will last up to 3 years if your willing to play at 720p from my experience. Overclocking is also helpful, in the case of the hd 5000 series and 6000 series you can get a good 20% overclock to scales linearly with performance. Some HD 7000 series can gain a 40% overclock, this seems to be the case with the 7850. I have not overclocked nvidia gpu's besides the 250 gts so I don't have much background there. When i say middle end for cpu I saying something like a phenom ii x6 or i5. GPU's are like HD 6870 or 560 ti. There is also a bit of personal prefence, for example some people only want 60 fps+ and others 30 fps+. Your going to have to descide what you want.


Good point. Although wattage consumption of a high end machine 5 years ago would be extremely high compared to a current middle end machine that offers similar performance, right?

You are right about the overclock though. A 6850 is able to surpass a stock 6870 in some benchmarks when pushing a good overclock. My 6850 should be able to get around 1GHZ Core Clock, which is almost a 30% increase.
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March 9, 2012 4:44:43 AM

SingingThroughTheStorm said:
Good point. Although wattage consumption of a high end machine 5 years ago would be extremely high compared to a current middle end machine that offers similar performance, right?

You are right about the overclock though. A 6850 is able to surpass a stock 6870 in some benchmarks when pushing a good overclock. My 6850 should be able to get around 1GHZ Core Clock, which is almost a 30% increase.

For the most part ya, a good example is the 7750 which has similar performance to the 4870 but consumes less energy.
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March 9, 2012 5:00:45 AM

3-5 years for me. It really depends on a lot of things though.
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March 9, 2012 5:05:47 AM

Every 18 months - 2 years or so, spending $500 - $600 usually. I typically buy stuff that's a bit behind the bleeding edge cost-wise but that performs on-par or above the front-line components. (386DX-40!) Most of my stuff could probably be pushed to last a while longer, but I run two main systems and I'd prefer that the second wasn't that far out of date. So when I get new gear, everything gets cycled on down the line and the secondary computer isn't totally useless.

I'm breaking my habit at the moment though, having recently bought a 7970 that will shortly be put into the 3960x system I'm building.
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March 9, 2012 5:09:43 AM

Phyrexiancure said:
Middle end cpu's last about 3-5 years, meaning your motherboard will last 3-5 years or more if there is a good upgrade path. Over clocking is important for this. A middle end gpu will last up to 3 years if your willing to play at 720p from my experience. Overclocking is also helpful, in the case of the hd 5000 series and 6000 series you can get a good 20% overclock to scales linearly with performance. Some HD 7000 series can gain a 40% overclock, this seems to be the case with the 7850. I have not overclocked nvidia gpu's besides the 250 gts so I don't have much background there. When i say middle end for cpu I saying something like a phenom ii x6 or i5. GPU's are like HD 6870 or 560 ti. There is also a bit of personal prefence, for example some people only want 60 fps+ and others 30 fps+. Your going to have to descide what you want.


Who's willing to play at 720p? I haven't run that low of a resolution in over a decade except when I got my first affordable flatscreen to take to LAN parties.

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March 9, 2012 5:23:44 AM

doughillman said:
Who's willing to play at 720p? I haven't run that low of a resolution in over a decade except when I got my first affordable flatscreen to take to LAN parties.


720P shouldn't be terrible on smaller screen sizes and a lot of AA. :lol: 
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March 9, 2012 5:38:38 AM

SingingThroughTheStorm said:
720P shouldn't be terrible on smaller screen sizes and a lot of AA. :lol: 

Well at least its better than consoles lol. A while a go I played a game on my 360 before I sold it and realized how much aliasing the games have.
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March 9, 2012 6:07:04 AM

Phyrexiancure said:
Well at least its better than consoles lol. A while a go I played a game on my 360 before I sold it and realized how much aliasing the games have.


Yeah, but I still like my PS3 regardless. Too many good exclusives to be held up by something like low resolution. :) 

Although on a PC where you have the option, I don't see why you wouldn't spend the extra $20 for a video card that can handle more then 720P for games.
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March 9, 2012 3:37:36 PM

Phyrexiancure said:
Middle end cpu's last about 3-5 years, meaning your motherboard will last 3-5 years or more if there is a good upgrade path. Over clocking is important for this. A middle end gpu will last up to 3 years if your willing to play at 720p from my experience. Overclocking is also helpful, in the case of the hd 5000 series and 6000 series you can get a good 20% overclock to scales linearly with performance. Some HD 7000 series can gain a 40% overclock, this seems to be the case with the 7850. I have not overclocked nvidia gpu's besides the 250 gts so I don't have much background there. When i say middle end for cpu I saying something like a phenom ii x6 or i5. GPU's are like HD 6870 or 560 ti. There is also a bit of personal prefence, for example some people only want 60 fps+ and others 30 fps+. Your going to have to descide what you want.


That's why to me I'll never spend more than ~$250 - $~$300 on a GPU setup - that's the one part of a PC that's constantly changing and what's out say 6 months from now in the same price range will be just as good if not better than what's out now. To me it's stunning to see a $275 GPU like the Radeon 7870 perform just as well as a $500 GPU like the GTX 580.
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March 9, 2012 4:20:29 PM

SingingThroughTheStorm said:
Yeah, but I still like my PS3 regardless. Too many good exclusives to be held up by something like low resolution. :) 

Although on a PC where you have the option, I don't see why you wouldn't spend the extra $20 for a video card that can handle more then 720P for games.


True, I do like the some Japanese of the games that consoles get besides their other exclusives. Its a good thing that there are emulating commutes out their on the pc even though they are not perfect. I recently bought the wii game Xenoblade just to emulate it on my pc.
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March 10, 2012 1:13:24 AM

SingingThroughTheStorm said:
Yeah, but I still like my PS3 regardless. Too many good exclusives to be held up by something like low resolution. :) 



Oh yeah, I've got all three consoles and game on them quite a bit. But almost any game where I've got the option, I'm gonna get for the PC instead where I can play it at a much higher resolution. Skyrim looks nice on my buddy's 360, but Skyrim looks jaw-droppingly gorgeous on my PC at 2560 x 1600. :) 

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