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Computer problem

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March 9, 2012 12:41:14 PM

I built my computer a year ago and it has worked fine until recently. A few weeks ago I started to notice some glitches like random web pages taking an unusually long time to load, then the computer started locking up and blue screens. I use Avast virus protection and it showed no virus. I though it might be RAM so i ran memtest and the RAM was fine. I brought it to a computer repair shop and they told me they ran numerous tests and could not find a virus.

The problem still persists. I play WOW on a free server (Molten) and thought that might be the problem, even though i have been playing on that server for the last 6 months with no problems.

so if its not RAM
and its not a virus
and the computer tech saying the computer looks fine...

what else can it be?

More about : computer problem

a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2012 12:49:21 PM

It could be basically anything else in your computer, and there's not enough information to narrow it down beyond that.

Short list of components that could be doing it, in descending probability:

Power Supply: Peak output drops over their lifespan, if you built your system with very little extra wattage on the PSU, this will cause severe instability after several months to a few years, depending on the quality of the PSU. Cheap PSUs can die in weeks.

Hard Drive: These can fail for absolutely no reason, they're very finicky things. Usually you'd get other symptoms, like files getting corrupted and being unable to boot into Windows, or the drive totally bricking.

Motherboard: Everything connects to the motherboard, so a failure here can do all sorts of weird stuff.

Video Card: Failure here produces lots of bluescreens and freezes.
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March 9, 2012 12:53:08 PM

heat.... check your CPU and GPU temps with some software like Speedfan

If you CPU hits 70C + during load you are probably needing to reapply thermal paste and clean the HS/F. If your GPU is up past 90C under load it could be needing similar treatment.

ALSO, even if both CPU and GPU are ok it could be the gRAM overheating. To check this underclock the gRAM severely and turn your GPU fan speed up to 100%(this will impact performance but is only temporary to locate the problem.) If you can run without crashes it is probably the gRAM.

Only known fix I have seen work is the oven bake trick to re-solder the points. BEFORE THIS, check that any thermal pads that mate the gRAM to graphics heatsink are in place and in contact on both sides.

If you do not have a full coverage heatsink the oven bake is likely your only shot.
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March 9, 2012 1:08:17 PM

americanbrian said:
heat.... check your CPU and GPU temps with some software like Speedfan



Heat is the first place to start looking. When's the last time you opened your case and blew the dust out? If you haven't opened the case since you built it, it's a good possibility the cpu and gpu are covered in dust. Heat can cause blue screens and lock-ups.
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March 9, 2012 1:27:08 PM

my rig set up is in my sig...
My PSU is XFX (year old)
my GPU was replaced about 2 or 3 months ago
i have a SSD running the OS and a HDD for storage.
the temps are in the normal ranges
how can you tell if your mobo is on the fritz without replacing it?

i have no idea how to under/over clock...i was going to attempt it on my cpu, but my mobo doesnt allow it.
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Best solution

March 12, 2012 9:32:36 AM

you can underclock the GPU ram with most "overclocking" utilities. Check this thread for a list of what other people have used...

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=213838

I suspect heat because winter is over and ambients are going up. Low ambient can mask problems over the winter. I now heavily suspect your 560ti gRAM. They use cheap cheap memory at the MAX they can get away with on these mid-range cards. And your problems have started shortly after that GPU change...
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March 12, 2012 12:39:45 PM

americanbrian said:

I suspect heat because winter is over and ambients are going up. Low ambient can mask problems over the winter. I now heavily suspect your 560ti gRAM. They use cheap cheap memory at the MAX they can get away with on these mid-range cards. And your problems have started shortly after that GPU change...


I was thinking the same, but the temps are normal. I played wow this weekend with no problems...then bam, pc freezes and blue screen. I have run Spybot, CCleaner and it is working fine again.

i guess its time to invest in a new GPU...I am not too happy with Gigabyte since i already had to return 1 card and it took over a month to get the replacement.

Anyone have recommendations on a quality card/manufacturer?

Thanks for the replys
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March 12, 2012 12:40:25 PM

Best answer selected by seller417.
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March 13, 2012 9:02:19 AM

Just make sure it has a full coverage heatsink and fan and that the ram has thermal pads making contact between the RAM and H/S. They tend to be far more reliable,

A new 7000 series radeon may be good too as they use less power ---> less heat. If you can get a refund on your 560ti that is...

If you are not able to, you can always try the oven bake technique and keeping the gRAM underclocked....
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