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Ivy bridge and pci-e 2.0 x16?

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June 27, 2012 1:12:09 AM

would an Ivy Bridge i5 3570k cpu be compatible with a GTX 560? (GTX 560 uses a pci 2.0x16)

More about : ivy bridge pci x16

June 27, 2012 1:15:17 AM

oh the mobo is a ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77
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a c 125 à CPUs
June 27, 2012 1:48:33 AM

PCIe is backward-compatible. Properly designed devices should automatically fall back to the highest version supported by both endpoints.
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June 27, 2012 1:54:10 AM

uhh I'm out of it right now, but your basically saying it would work right?
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a c 125 à CPUs
June 27, 2012 2:00:34 AM

Unless there is a weird interoperability quirk between the CPU and GPU, yes.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 27, 2012 2:10:32 AM

i thought i read somewhere on here that some Z77 boards have a force previous PCI gen in the BIOS for if there are any problems.

or i could have been hallucinating.
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June 27, 2012 2:14:31 AM

Radeon HD 6850 vs GTX 560? which would you recommend? I'm not a hardcore gamer, I play like HoN, LoL, etc.
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June 27, 2012 2:58:48 AM

What would you change in my build and do I really need 750W? My budget is around $1000
MY BUILD:
Thermaltake Chaser MK-I Full Tower ATX
Intel Core i5 3570K
ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77
OCZ Technology Vertex 4 128GB
Corsair Vengeance Series 8GB
EVGA GTX 560
SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W
LG 24x DVD±RW Burner - OEM
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Best solution

Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 27, 2012 4:18:34 AM

RamenNooodles said:
What would you change in my build and do I really need 750W? My budget is around $1000
MY BUILD:
Thermaltake Chaser MK-I Full Tower ATX
Intel Core i5 3570K
ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77
OCZ Technology Vertex 4 128GB
Corsair Vengeance Series 8GB
EVGA GTX 560
SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W
LG 24x DVD±RW Burner - OEM

you do not need a 750 watts PSU; lets look at something:

that is full power consumption for the whole system which has a Intel Core i7 920 with a TDP is 130 watts.
the i5 in your build is 77 watts TDP a 53 watt difference in your favor so to speak.
so most likely your system with the 560 will not hit 233 watts. a 450 watt PSU can handle that no problem.

now i am going to suggest a few things one of which is getting a 500-550 watt PSU because that can handle most any single graphics card set up.
SeaSonic M12II 520 Bronze 520W $59.99
the second of which is get a platter (hard drive) you want to move the windows paging file off of the SSD to save the writes to it and extend its life. remember SSD life expectancy is measured by writes to the disk, so limit that. a little 250 gig drive is good enough, also putting your "User" files, such as media; pictures, music and videos will free up some space on that SSD.
Western Digital Caviar Blue WD2500AAKX 250GB $69.99
and finally i don't know exactly how much you have left in your budget, i suspect swapping down the PSU free'd up a few buck to spend on the hard drive. but if you can get a GTX 670 go for it, it is the best bang for the buck GPU going. but if you can't thats ok. you might want to look at the GTX 560ti, i believe they are coming down in price to clear out some left over chips to make room for the GTX 660 to come out.
ZOTAC AMP! ZT-50302-10M GeForce GTX 560 Ti $209.99
$179.99 after mail-in rebate

i don't know if you play the rebate game but if you do and overclock the 560ti you will end up with the performance of a 570 for about $20-$30 more than what i am guessing you're paying. and yes the 520 watt seasonic can handle that.
the rest of the build looks good; i believe its a compliment when i say it is the more common gaming build going; not the exact piece, not everyone can afford the sabertooth, but it shows you're doing good.
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June 27, 2012 5:18:36 AM

Thanks alot! I appreciate your help. :D 
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June 27, 2012 4:18:43 PM

Wait, I don't know much about SSD's so I don't get it. I install windows on the HDD? Or just the user files? How would I do that?
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a c 188 à CPUs
June 27, 2012 5:48:28 PM

With an SSD >64GB you want to set that up as a boot drive if you are using a Z68 or Z77 chipset based board. In this case you are going to load the OS and a few commonly used applications based on the size of the drive. You want to keep the storage for files/data on the storage (normal HDD) to maximize your SSD.

Below 64GB you will used the Intel® SRT (Smart Response Technology) which will allow you to set the drive up as a caching drive to give you better performance for a commonly used applications. This will give you better performance then an HDD but not as good as using a SSD as a boot drive.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 27, 2012 9:46:50 PM

RamenNooodles said:
Wait, I don't know much about SSD's so I don't get it. I install windows on the HDD? Or just the user files? How would I do that?

install windows on the SSD without the hard drive plugged in. remember to do the ahci voodoo dance so you have trim and all that good stuff.

once you have windows installed and you booted fine, install the HD and boot up. configure the swap file and your user files to reside on the HD. there are many tutorials around that can help you do all of this.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1133897/windows-7-ssd-tweaki...
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/270102-32-useful-arti...
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June 27, 2012 10:22:34 PM

Best answer selected by RamenNooodles.
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