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I5 SSD or i7 HD

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March 13, 2012 9:53:33 PM

I'm contemplating 2 different laptops.

One has a core-i5 2467 and SSD. The second is a core-i7 2675m, HD with 8GB flash express cache on the motherboard. Both have 8GB ram.

All I care about is speed on my day to day use. I don't care about gaming, or intense video rendering etc. But I do work on my computer all day, and have 5-10 apps open at all times including Photoshop, Visual Studio, multiple browsers, and more.

I want a snappy computer that I can jump around and in/out of many apps all at once.

I'm wondering if the i5+SSD option above would give better or worse results for my uses than the i7+HD

More about : ssd

March 13, 2012 10:17:45 PM

If speed is the name of the game, I'd definitely go with the i7 based on side by side specs alone

http://ark.intel.com/compare/53470,56858

In terms of storage options: you can always upgrade/add an additional drive/SSD later (if that option is available), something you can't do with a cpu (at least on a laptop).
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March 13, 2012 10:29:04 PM

I vote for the SSD based laptop. I have installed a ssd in a couple of older laptops, and it absolutely transforms them.
Once you have a modern dual core cpu, you will have sufficient cpu power for normal acitvities.
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March 14, 2012 12:03:16 AM

James McKeane said:
If speed is the name of the game, I'd definitely go with the i7 based on side by side specs alone

http://ark.intel.com/compare/53470,56858

In terms of storage options: you can always upgrade/add an additional drive/SSD later (if that option is available), something you can't do with a cpu (at least on a laptop).


Thanks for the feedback.

I'm mostly curious to know the impact of an SSD on everyday operations. I've never had an SSD, so I'm unclear on if it boosts performance more or less than the higher end CPU for non-gaming, non-rendering type activities. I really just want to be able to simultaneously use many apps and switch quickly between them all. Several of these apps running at once on my current laptop really grinds me down to a halt (Visual Studio + Photoshop + Illustrator + several different browsers). I'm developing web apps so I need to have these apps and multiple browsers open to quickly flip around and test.

So the root question really is does an SSD or CPU impact this type of speed requirement.
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March 14, 2012 12:19:32 AM

cglubish said:
Thanks for the feedback.

I'm mostly curious to know the impact of an SSD on everyday operations. I've never had an SSD, so I'm unclear on if it boosts performance more or less than the higher end CPU for non-gaming, non-rendering type activities. I really just want to be able to simultaneously use many apps and switch quickly between them all. Several of these apps running at once on my current laptop really grinds me down to a halt (Visual Studio + Photoshop + Illustrator + several different browsers). I'm developing web apps so I need to have these apps and multiple browsers open to quickly flip around and test.

So the root question really is does an SSD or CPU impact this type of speed requirement.


That little bit of clarity helped alot. In that case, as geofelt stated above, a modern dual core i5 cpu, a ssd, and 8gb of ram should run laps around what you're currently running and be more than able to run several high demand applications.
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March 14, 2012 1:10:37 AM

If your current laptop is short of ram, like 2-4gb, then 8gb will be very good. You will be able to keep many apps open and suffer nothing when switching between them.

Where the SSD helps is opening up the apps in the first place, doing maintenance, booting, and anything involving hard drive i/o. Laptop hard drives are not great performers, opting instead to save battery power.
A SSD will be 50x faster in random i/o and 2-3x faster in sequential than the best desktop hard drives of today. If you can get a laptop that has sufficient storage, then that is wonderful. A good SSD will cost about $1.30 per gb, so be prepared for that.
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March 14, 2012 1:20:50 AM

For day to day use, i think you will do very well with the i5/SSD model.
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March 14, 2012 10:20:44 PM

I use an SSD in my laptop. (Intel 320). I'd go with the I5/SSD not the I7 as long as you have enough disk space on the SSD to hold the work you need.

"I'm developing web apps" Do these typically pull a lot of classes from disk when you build? If so the SSD will be killer fast. However your work enviropnment sounds like a large disk footprint. My thinkpad holds both an SSD and a spinning hard drive in the second bay, but this is not optimal. Seom tooling fails when parts are not in default directories on c: and you need to keep a close eye on where stuff gets installed. Double check that the SSD is large enough to hold your work before settling on it.
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March 22, 2012 12:04:17 AM

Best answer selected by cglubish.
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