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I have some rookie questions.

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March 15, 2012 12:45:58 AM

I'm buying everything BUT the graphics card TOMORROW all at once. I'm making this systme, and well I need you guys to tell me if I need anything else, something wont work, much more. PLEASE keep in mind that I am 100% needing you guys to tell me if this will turn on, work, run. You know.

Question 1: If I get all this, will I be able to make a system out of it? No extra anything. Am I missing something???


Optical drive: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler Master HAF 942 case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

3TB HDD 7200rpm 64mb cache: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

1000w PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

16GB 1600MHz RAM: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Motherboard: (I really need to know if this is good...) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

i5 2550k Processor: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Water cooler: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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a b U Graphics card
March 15, 2012 1:20:01 AM

why on earth do you need a 1000w power supply, and where is that video card!
March 15, 2012 1:22:24 AM

The video card will be a GTX 6xx card when it comes out in... April maybe? I can do without until then :) 

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March 15, 2012 1:26:33 AM

What's the purpose for this build? Gaming? What resolution monitors will you be using? You already have an Operating System? Windows 7 64 bit? Right now it seems like you're using too much money for case, PSU, CPU cooler, RAM, and you're getting the wrong motherboard. Help us by explaining what your usage is for this PC.
a c 130 U Graphics card
March 15, 2012 1:47:41 AM

Optical Drive - No problem
Case - No problem
Hard Drive - No problem
Power Supply - As redeemer asks, why do you need a 1000watt PSU?
RAM - 4GB is sufficient. 8GB is excessive IMO. 16GB is only necessary if you're running a server.
Motherboard - Ok, but probably too expensive/more than you need. Also, no on-board GPU chipset, so you WILL need some sort of graphics card.
CPU - No problem (assuming compatibility with current/new motherboard).
Water Cooler - You're a rookie. Leave this until you have more experience in building (just my $0.02)

-Wolf sends

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a b U Graphics card
March 15, 2012 2:03:08 AM
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gaming and multi-taskers will only use 4-6GB of ram for the foreseeable future, so 8GB is plenty for most high profile users. You only need 16GB of ram if you are doing large HD video editing projects, or other ram-heavy production work... and even then you should be looking at 32GB of ram if you can afford it.

Yes, the motherboard is good, but likely overkill. Most people only need a board in the $120-175 range, but then again you get what you pay for, and that board has a lot of neat features if you need them. ASUS is perhaps the best company out there right now, so good choice.

The 680 should take ~250W, so assuming it has a similar power requirement to the 580 we can see a minimum requirement of 600W to run 1 GPU, +250W for each additional GPU. As those suggestions are provisioning a little extra wattage I would say you could run 3 GTX680s on 1000W. Your motherboard will only do 2 GPUs, so I would suggest a quality power supply (80+Silver or better) in the 850W range. 1000W is just nuts for this type of build. If doing a single GPU then 600W is all you need, and if doing lower spec cards in SLi than the flagship then 750W should be plenty. But then again we won't know for sure until the GPUs are released.

Looks like a killer water cooler, but keep in mind that simple coolers like the hyper 212+ will cool a 2500K enough that you will run into clock instability issues before you run into heat issues. Again, good cooler, just not necessary and mostly for bragging rights.

I love seagate drives. They are not the fastest, nor the quietest, but they run nice and cool and they last forever. I have a 7 year old 1TB seagate in my rig, and it is still running great. The other is 4 years old, and my system drive is only 1, and I have a 6 year old drive in my wife's PC still running strong, and I have a few 10+ year old drives that still work (but they were only in operation for ~5-6 years). There is a chance of getting a DOA, but if it lasts for a year then you can almost bet it will last you a good long time.

It is almost a crime to spend that much money on a water cooler, and such a high end mobo, nice case, and so much ram, but not buy an SSD for this build. Seriously HDDs are the largest bottleneck of any computer, and even getting a small SSD for OS and most used programs would really make your computer feel like it is flying! I recently upgraded my editing rig, and while it is a monster frame pusher (especially compared to my old Core2Duo lol), my wife's little office PC runs circles around mine for the silly every day stuff. Mine is capable of more, but if I am just browsing the web and simple stuff then I find myself using her computer more and more instead of my i7 with 16GB of ram and GTX570. It just makes that much of a difference in day-to-day use. I would suggest a 120GB or 240GB Mushkin chronos, perhaps the most overlooked drive on the market. It is cheaper than the OCZ Agility3, and almost as fast as the OCZ Vertex3, and (from what I can tell) more stable than either. Of course, if longevity is your game then the M4 or an Intel drive would be the way to go.

In short; Great build, everything would work out of the box, but you can splurge a little more in some areas and pull back a little in others to make it a more rounded machine.
a b U Graphics card
March 15, 2012 2:06:36 AM

Wolfshadw said:
Optical Drive - No problem
Case - No problem
Hard Drive - No problem
Power Supply - As redeemer asks, why do you need a 1000watt PSU?
RAM - 4GB is sufficient. 8GB is excessive IMO. 16GB is only necessary if you're running a server.
Motherboard - Ok, but probably too expensive/more than you need. Also, no on-board GPU chipset, so you WILL need some sort of graphics card.
CPU - No problem (assuming compatibility with current/new motherboard).
Water Cooler - You're a rookie. Leave this until you have more experience in building (just my $0.02)

-Wolf sends

Good catch on the motherboard, when I saw the price tag I automatically thought it was a z68! Nobody should pay that much for a p67 board. I would spend $75-130 on a p67, or $120-200 on a z68. Also, as pointed out, there is no onboard video for p67 bords, so you would have to purchase a cheap GPU to get things going for the moment, or else get a z68 board so you can use the onboard video.
March 15, 2012 2:07:14 AM

I wouldn't agree that 4 GBs is sufficient anymore. 8 GBs is dirt cheap, too. I think the sweet spot has moved. I'm using 4 GBs right now just watching netflix, having a few background programs running, and a bunch of Chrome tabs.

The water cooler is a closed-loop, pre-assembled, pre-filled one. It's not something you would need experience to use. I do agree that it's not the best option, though. Seems overly expensive.
March 15, 2012 2:55:48 AM

Wow, thank all of you sooo much. I only want to stick wit5h 16GB RAM because I was planning on 1080 video editing, and a lot. I'm just trying to future-proof my system. Could you guys maybe recommend a good moboard? Thanks guys n gals.

Edit: One with onboard video please :) 

Edit, 3: I decided I will for video, buy a IDK GTX 560 or something from Best Buy, take it back in a month. I know it's wrong, but I'll be buying a 600$ card from them in a month so... meh.
March 15, 2012 3:04:19 AM

Best answer selected by ttg_avenged.
a b U Graphics card
March 16, 2012 1:06:43 PM

ttg_Avenged said:
Wow, thank all of you sooo much. I only want to stick wit5h 16GB RAM because I was planning on 1080 video editing, and a lot. I'm just trying to future-proof my system. Could you guys maybe recommend a good moboard? Thanks guys n gals.

Edit: One with onboard video please :) 

Edit, 3: I decided I will for video, buy a IDK GTX 560 or something from Best Buy, take it back in a month. I know it's wrong, but I'll be buying a 600$ card from them in a month so... meh.


If this is an editing rig then I have a little more advice for you:
Get a GPU supported by the editor you are using. If you are using Adobe, we do not know how well/stable the new 600 series cards will work for CUDA, and it may be a few months before it it patched, or they may make you upgrade your editing suite to work properly with the new hardware. You need a minimum GTX570 for CUDA to work. Yes, you can hack it to make CUDA work on something slower, but it will cause headaches and instability. Other editors have different requirements for hardware acceleration. Note: If a GPU is not specifically required for some form of hardware acceleration then there is no advantage to putting a large GPU into your editing rig. Yes, you still want one with 512MB or more of Ram, but as all video editing processing is done on the CPU the only advantage of the GPU is to take the load off for running the interface, which even a $50 GPU can manage with no problem. Also note that GPU support only accelerates specific things. CUDA only supports specific plugins that mostly relate to color correction, and green screening for realtime editing. It may or may not help boost your export. Technologies like Quicksink can dramatically boost your export, but they are crap quality.

Seriously consider an i7. Games do not take advantage of hyper-threading, but productivity work does. It will give a 1/3rd boost to just about everything you do when working with video. The i5 is still respectable, but the i7 is really what you want.

16GB is a must for video editing, but it does not need to be 1600. When it comes to video work your bottlenecks are in the speed of your HDDs and your CPU, and 1333 is plenty fast to feed information to both. Of course, if you have the money for 1600 then go for it, but if it comes down to affording the faster Ram or something else, then spend the money on something else.

You NEED multiple hard drives to take advantage of your hardware. You want an OS drive, a Media drive, and a Scratch disc. If you buy a large enough SSD then you can combine the OS and scrach disc on a single drive, but you will still want a nice large drive (or a pair of large drives in RAID1) to serve up your media and store your finished products. The reason you want multiple single use drives is that HDDs are extremely linear in their abilities. When streaming/copying a single large file then a cheap modern HDD can do ~100-140MB/s, but if you are reading from it, and using the same drive as a scratch disc, then performance plummets down to 25-50MB/s.
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