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Digital Camera

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June 8, 2005 12:11:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I need a new camera. Is there a site that compares and explains the
different options in the new cameras. Ie. what storage media is faster,
etc.

More about : digital camera

Anonymous
June 8, 2005 12:26:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike wrote:

> I need a new camera. Is there a site that compares and explains the
> different options in the new cameras. Ie. what storage media is faster,
> etc.

Soemone posted this one earlier...excellent resource:

http://www.dpreview.com/

Regards,

Ben
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 2:26:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 7 Jun 2005 20:11:50 -0700, "Mike" <add@mcnabs.com> wrote:

>I need a new camera. Is there a site that compares and explains the
>different options in the new cameras. Ie. what storage media is faster,
>etc.
>

If you have access to a local public library, check out Jul 05
issue of Consumer Reports, they reviewed cameras (74), editing
software, organizing software and Web sites, printing at home, store,
and Web sites, printers for photos.
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Anonymous
June 8, 2005 9:51:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike wrote:
> I need a new camera. Is there a site that compares and explains the
> different options in the new cameras. Ie. what storage media is faster,
> etc.
>
>

The best one I know of is: http://www.megapixel.net/
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 9:30:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Mike" <add@mcnabs.com> writes:

> I need a new camera. Is there a site that compares and explains the
> different options in the new cameras. Ie. what storage media is faster,
> etc.

Unfortunately it will be like drinking from a fire hose, since there can be so
much information. Note, the speed of the storage media for most people is very
low on the list of priorities (ie, to me it is much more important what the
pictures look like after you take them, and what the cost of the camera is
compared to the speed in writing the picture).

Before starting out think about the following:

1) How much can you realistically afford? Digital cameras do have a higher
initial cost than film cameras, but for many people if you take enough
pictures, and only print the keepers, you will eventually come out ahead
with digital (unless you keep buying more gear).

2) How large prints do you want to make, or will you only be doing web shots?
For a lot of people 4x6" prints are as large as they want, while 8x10 is
sufficient for many others.

3) How big of a camera (& lenses if a DSLR) do you want to carry around? A big
camera often times takes better pictures, but a camera you can fit in your
pocket might be more useful than a camera sitting at home.

4) What do 'normal' pictures from your camera look like? Each camera has
different tones, some producing more cooler colors, some more saturated.
Also consider whether you want to edit pictures afterwards with a photo
editor like Photoshop to bring out the best image, or you want to print
pictures straight from your camera.

5) How much do you want manual features or things like external flash support?
FWIW, my first digital camera was a camera with mostly just automatic modes,
and within about 4 months I was feeling boxed in by the limitations of the
camera, but my wife and daughter are happy with it.

6) Do you want to photograph vast vistas (wide angle), distant shots
(telephoto), or close-up items (macro)? Different cameras have different
ranges that they can photograph.

7) If you are getting a high zoom camera, does your camera have image
stabalization which helps avoid camera shake in low light.

8) How much indoor shots compared to outdoor shots are you going to do? For
indoor shots, you might want to consider external flash support, since the
onboard flash is often times fairly weak and also causes red-eye in people,
and green-eyes in pets, but a flash adds to the cost, and is bulky.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
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