Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

85 degrees for i5 2500k? How long will it last?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
July 2, 2012 10:51:46 AM

Hi,
I've recently built an i5 2500k, mainly for pcsx2. I live In a fairly hot country, and while playing mgs3 on Pcsx2 I get temperatures around 85 degrees. I plan to over clock to 3.8 ghz, but I'm afraid that will increase temperatures beyond 95 degrees. So at 85 degrees what should be the lifespan of my CPU. I atleast want it to last 5 years. And if I get a cheap aftermarket cooler(probably a cm 212), what temperatures should I expect?

Thanks.

More about : degrees 2500k long

July 2, 2012 11:27:04 AM

Those temps seem very high to me(from my experience).
I use an AMD proc (FX-4100 @ 4.5) and I only get above 60 at the hottest days. I tend to get a little nervous above 65*C - if you want your processor to last a long time, the cooler the better.

From Intel's website, the max temperature the processor should reach is: 72.6*C (Source)
See pages: 41, 42,44

Quote from page 41:
Quote:
To allow the optimal operation and long-term reliability of Intel processor-based systems, the processor must remain within the minimum and maximum case temperature (TCASE) specifications as defined by the applicable thermal profile. Thermal solutions not designed to provide this level of thermal capability may affect the long-term reliability of the processor and system.


I think any decently reviewed air cooler will bring your temps down significantly. I am using a 5 year old cooler in my new pc (as it is very quiet) - and it works wonders over the stock cooler. A water cooler will d oeven better...and may be better suited to your climate.

Just make sure to put on your thermal paste correctly, and clean the old stuff off very well (use 99% isopropyl alcohol & q-tips / tissue).

A good article is here: Hardware Secrets

m
0
l
July 2, 2012 12:26:18 PM

fjay said:
Those temps seem very high to me(from my experience).
I use an AMD proc (FX-4100 @ 4.5) and I only get above 60 at the hottest days. I tend to get a little nervous above 65*C - if you want your processor to last a long time, the cooler the better.

From Intel's website, the max temperature the processor should reach is: 72.6*C (Source)
See pages: 41, 42,44

Quote from page 41:
Quote:
To allow the optimal operation and long-term reliability of Intel processor-based systems, the processor must remain within the minimum and maximum case temperature (TCASE) specifications as defined by the applicable thermal profile. Thermal solutions not designed to provide this level of thermal capability may affect the long-term reliability of the processor and system.


I think any decently reviewed air cooler will bring your temps down significantly. I am using a 5 year old cooler in my new pc (as it is very quiet) - and it works wonders over the stock cooler. A water cooler will d oeven better...and may be better suited to your climate.

Just make sure to put on your thermal paste correctly, and clean the old stuff off very well (use 99% isopropyl alcohol & q-tips / tissue).

A good article is here: Hardware Secrets


thanks fjay, but this post doesnt answere all of my questions, like the likely lifespan of my cpu. thanks anyway.
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

a c 283 à CPUs
July 2, 2012 12:42:53 PM

Moeed said:
but this post doesnt answere all of my questions, like the likely lifespan of my cpu.


Honestly, no one can really tell you that because no one really knows for sure. Any answer anyone gives you would be a complete estimation and guess.

My definite answer is that it will, of course, shorten the lifespan somewhat, but I can't tell you an exact amount of time for absolute certain.

My best guess is that if you ran it 24/7 like that, without OC'ing, it may last 4 to 5 years, and possibly a bit longer. If you OC with it that warm, it would probably be less than that.

And yes, a Hyper 212 Evo would be great. Again, I can't give you a definite answer on the exact temps you'll see, but it will absolutely be much cooler.
Share
July 2, 2012 1:42:01 PM

Best answer selected by moeed.
m
0
l
July 2, 2012 2:20:38 PM

DJDecibel is right, and is why I did not put out a direct answer. Everything is a guess/judgement call. I am not a computer engineer, so I am not exactly qualified to present the information. (I am a mechanical engineer though - so I can give qualified advice on heat transfer -although this stuff is pretty basic).

I am sure Intel uses factors of safety in their designs, but there are too many variables to take into account for longevity of your processor. If I was you, I would find a way to get the temperature lowered. At the temperatures you are showing, the processor may automatically slow down to protect itself- which is bad news for gaming.

As for temp drop - you can typically expect between 10-30*C drop with an aftermarket cooler, depending on ambient conditions. Again Hardware secrets is a good place for this information and comparisons between coolers. Also do some research for reviews with any cooler you wish to purchase.

You also should also make sure you have good airflow through your case - larger/more fans may be required, or you simply may need to change how they are arranged. There are some good articles on the net that explain the best ways to arrange them. - Typically, air flow from front to back, and from bottom to top is the best way to flow air through a case. Also, ensuring your rear case fan is helping the cpu cooler (not fighting it - i.e. make sure they are pulling in the same direction) is a good start.

m
0
l
!