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$2500 Gaming Build - Need a look over!

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March 18, 2012 10:40:50 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: Sometime this month to next month.

Budget Range: $2500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, General Use

Parts Not Required: OS, I have a few monitors but, I might want another.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg.com

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU; Probably AMD GPU, unless Kepler is worth the wait.

Overclocking: Yes

SLI or Crossfire: In the future

Monitor Resolution: 1080p

Additional Comments: Here's what I have so far.

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z68 Deluxe/Gen 3 LGA 1155 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case: Aerocool Strike-X ST http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

CPU: i5 2500K http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: Antec 850w Modular http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM: (2x4GB) G.Skill Sniper 2133 MHz http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or G.Skill Sniper 8GB 1866 (1.5v)

GPU: XFX 7970 Black Edition http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... or similar 7970.

CPU Cooler: H100 Extreme Cooler http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Caviar Black 1TB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD (OS): Crucial M4 128GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Keyboard: Razer Marauder Starcraft II Gaming Keyboard http://us.blizzard.com/store/details.xml?id=1100001512

Mouse: Spectre Starcraft II Gaming Mouse http://us.blizzard.com/store/details.xml?id=1100001511

Still need headset! I think there's about $300-400 left over!

More about : 2500 gaming build

a b 4 Gaming
March 18, 2012 11:01:03 PM

I'd hang around for Kepler. The 7970's got great performance, but it sounds like a jet engine. The top of the new line should be coming out within a couple of weeks.
1666mhz RAM is definitely enough.
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March 18, 2012 11:34:24 PM

I recommend sennheiser pc360 for a headset
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Related resources
a c 279 4 Gaming
March 18, 2012 11:38:50 PM

kajabla said:
I'd hang around for Kepler. The 7970's got great performance, but it sounds like a jet engine. The top of the new line should be coming out within a couple of weeks.
1666mhz RAM is definitely enough.


Yeah - don't go over 1600 as that can not only fry your whole build but it will void your warranty as well. As most of the regulars know I'm not the biggest fan of the wait for Keppler/Ivy movement that's been going on - after the overhype and subsequent disappointment of the AMD FX series, I think the Keppler / Ivy fans are going to be seriously disappointed. I'm not recommending anything until there's an actual product that's out and benchmarked. Right now it's all PR noise and insane Apple-esque overhype - and people are falling for it.

I would not recommend expensive peripherals like that - to me it's a huge waste to spend $300 on keyboards, mice, headsets, etc when the cheap ones get the job done. I know it's a lot of personal preference but I like to put that money back into the GPU - you want the best GPU you can get for the money. After the PSU it's the second most important part of any build. You can always get the accessories later - concentrate on the build first.

Here's what I recommend for a $2K+ setup:

Case: Corsair Carbide 500R - $139.99
PSU: Corsair Professional Series HX850 - $179.99
Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth X79 - $329.99
CPU: 3.30GHz Intel Core i7-3820 - $319.99
Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 - $85.99
RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Redline 1600MHz - $159.99
SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 - $164.99
HD: Samsung Ecogreen F4 2TB - $149.99
Optical: LG Blu Ray Burner - $79.99
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 - $559.99

Total: $2,145.90

You can use the difference to get whatever peripherals you want - I generally don't recommend those as I kind of cringe at the thought of spending $150 on a keyboard and $80 for a mouse. The other reason I don't recommend peripherals in a build is that's almost always personal preference and you can get those after you get your components - they're the easiest thing to add or remove on a system.
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March 18, 2012 11:47:05 PM

If you have money left over I would really bump up the SSD in size. Yes, you can use a 128 just fine, but you will have to manually manage programs in order to stay in it. In a build of this price its totally worth just getting a bigger system drive.

I have the 128 M4 (119 usable) and it really only holds the system and a few large games/programs.
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March 18, 2012 11:50:07 PM

g-unit1111 said:

You can use the difference to get whatever peripherals you want - I generally don't recommend those as I kind of cringe at the thought of spending $150 on a keyboard and $80 for a mouse. The other reason I don't recommend peripherals in a build is that's almost always personal preference and you can get those after you get your components - they're the easiest thing to add or remove on a system.


I agree with a lot of the points g-unit made about the keyboard, mouse, case, and ram. I disagree with him about the Kepler being all hype however. There are credible sources of benchmarks coming out and the GTX 680 is reportedly going to be released this week. This post in particular illustrates why it may be worth the wait:

http://videocardz.com/31010/geforce-gtx-680-benchmark-l...

It seems the card will cost around the same as a 7970, outperform it, and it is more efficient. If you look around on that site, it is obviously not sponsored by one of the manufacturers and has info on all the newest video cards.

I LOVE AMD, don't get me wrong. I have just read enough about Nvidia's new offering that I am going to upgrade my GTX 570's for a pair of the GTX 680's if the performance is consistent with the info that has come out recently. The new card is going to be even better tuned for PhysX, making the games look better, and Nvidia seems to be able to get more out its drivers than AMD does as of late.

Either way you go, AMD or Nvidia, you should give it a week and just be sure before you invest $500+ into a GPU. Good luck with your system!!!
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March 18, 2012 11:51:17 PM

My opinion: High end accessories are completely worth it. I really love my weighted mouse, G13, and 7.1 surround headset -- they have really improved the experience for me.
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March 18, 2012 11:55:24 PM

Oops, forgot to mention the case. I have heard absolutely great things about this case. I own a CM HAX-932, and am very happy with it, so I cannot tell you how great it is from experiences, but this case in particular seems to be getting rave reviews and it's very supported in the gaming community!

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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March 18, 2012 11:58:43 PM

deadlockedworld said:
My opinion: High end accessories are completely worth it. I really love my weighted mouse, G13, and 7.1 surround headset -- they have really improved the experience for me.

I agree with that. Logitech is usually a good bet. But OP picked branded accessories, which are just overpriced, not high-quality.
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March 19, 2012 12:00:47 AM

Quote:
well 7.1 headset is not even close to a high end sound system LOL.


Hah. Yea, but its a worthy substitute. My girlfriend doesn't really enjoy the sound of FPS gunfire vibrating the house ... so I'm left with headsets.
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March 19, 2012 12:02:46 AM

Nim Chimpsky said:
I agree with that. Logitech is usually a good bet. But OP picked branded accessories, which are just overpriced, not high-quality.


I agree. I have all Logitech stuff - but the higher end of their selection. I meant "high-end" as in not typical consumer grade products.
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March 19, 2012 12:07:16 AM

I love a good headset!!!! Not only because of the great sound some of them offer, but it's great to have the extra noise cancelling. Not everyone can play with their computer hooked to a home theater all the time, even if they want to. Personally, I have a 3.1 for my computer speakers, I have a home theater system connected using the optical out and a 7.1 headset. I live in an apartment, so if I'm playing games late, or talking to someone on skype and don't want them to have to listen to my music/games, I just switch to my headset. When I want to crank it up... the home theater system gets it done! Having a great headset absolutely adds to gaming!
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March 19, 2012 1:17:07 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah - don't go over 1600 as that can not only fry your whole build but it will void your warranty as well. As most of the regulars know I'm not the biggest fan of the wait for Keppler/Ivy movement that's been going on - after the overhype and subsequent disappointment of the AMD FX series, I think the Keppler / Ivy fans are going to be seriously disappointed. I'm not recommending anything until there's an actual product that's out and benchmarked. Right now it's all PR noise and insane Apple-esque overhype - and people are falling for it.

I would not recommend expensive peripherals like that - to me it's a huge waste to spend $300 on keyboards, mice, headsets, etc when the cheap ones get the job done. I know it's a lot of personal preference but I like to put that money back into the GPU - you want the best GPU you can get for the money. After the PSU it's the second most important part of any build. You can always get the accessories later - concentrate on the build first.

Here's what I recommend for a $2K+ setup:

Case: Corsair Carbide 500R - $139.99
PSU: Corsair Professional Series HX850 - $179.99
Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth X79 - $329.99
CPU: 3.30GHz Intel Core i7-3820 - $319.99
Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 - $85.99
RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Redline 1600MHz - $159.99
SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 - $164.99
HD: Samsung Ecogreen F4 2TB - $149.99
Optical: LG Blu Ray Burner - $79.99
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 - $559.99

Total: $2,145.90

You can use the difference to get whatever peripherals you want - I generally don't recommend those as I kind of cringe at the thought of spending $150 on a keyboard and $80 for a mouse. The other reason I don't recommend peripherals in a build is that's almost always personal preference and you can get those after you get your components - they're the easiest thing to add or remove on a system.


Isn't there little point in getting a cooler if the CPU is locked?

I'm not going to need 16GB of RAM, I just game.

I want a full tower case.

I prefer G.Skill or Corsair RAM.

Are Samsung HDD's on par with WD's?
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a c 279 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 2:06:02 AM

Ironwilly said:
I agree with a lot of the points g-unit made about the keyboard, mouse, case, and ram. I disagree with him about the Kepler being all hype however. There are credible sources of benchmarks coming out and the GTX 680 is reportedly going to be released this week. This post in particular illustrates why it may be worth the wait:

http://videocardz.com/31010/geforce-gtx-680-benchmark-l...

It seems the card will cost around the same as a 7970, outperform it, and it is more efficient. If you look around on that site, it is obviously not sponsored by one of the manufacturers and has info on all the newest video cards.

I LOVE AMD, don't get me wrong. I have just read enough about Nvidia's new offering that I am going to upgrade my GTX 570's for a pair of the GTX 680's if the performance is consistent with the info that has come out recently. The new card is going to be even better tuned for PhysX, making the games look better, and Nvidia seems to be able to get more out its drivers than AMD does as of late.

Either way you go, AMD or Nvidia, you should give it a week and just be sure before you invest $500+ into a GPU. Good luck with your system!!!


I agree that it's definitely wait and see - and that's exactly why I am taking a wait and see attitude about Keppler. Actually *ANY* new CPUs and GPUs for that matter. I'm always a skeptic when it comes to trying something new in computer hardware but if the numbers I see don't match what I expect, I don't buy or recommend it. I'm really liking the new Radeons and I'm planning to upgrade my GPU to a 7870 as I can't exactly afford a pair of GTX 680s and it's definitely a more cost effective solution.

Quote:
Isn't there little point in getting a cooler if the CPU is locked?

I'm not going to need 16GB of RAM, I just game.


The 3820 has an unlocked multiplier - you will be able to overclock. I realize 16GB is overkill for a gaming rig but for X79 that's one of the best RAM kits around and I generally try not to compromise on the components I pick.

Quote:
Ya don't listen to that guy you don't need anything more than an i5 2500K for a high end gaming build and 4gb to 8gb ram is plenty and for the full tower case for you IMO the Antec 1200 is great.


Um... what? The 2500K is a great CPU don't get me wrong but if you have a $2K plus budget to work with, X79 will be far more future-proof than Z68 and P67 will be in the long run, and on higher end builds I try to be as future-proof as possible.

Quote:
My opinion: High end accessories are completely worth it. I really love my weighted mouse, G13, and 7.1 surround headset -- they have really improved the experience for me.


That's why I generally don't recommend peripherals as it's all personal preference. I personally like wireless as it gives me more freedom to move but I generally leave that up to the individual user to decide what peripherals they want. The thing is it's your system and you ultimately decide what goes in it, if you want to spend $150 on a keyboard, I'm not going to stop you.

Quote:

I want a full tower case.

I prefer G.Skill or Corsair RAM.

Are Samsung HDD's on par with WD's?


The Corsair Carbide and Graphite series are full tower equivalents - they're big, roomy, and very solidly constructed.

G.Skill makes great RAM, Corsair can be very questionable reliability, and I generally prefer Kingston and Crucial RAM as they have some of the lowest fail rates around.

Samsung makes great HDs (I don't know how they've been since selling their HD divison to Seagate) - I have a 1TB Spinpoint and it's been pretty flawless so far.
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March 19, 2012 2:10:05 AM

I also agree with going with a LGA 1155 CPU is the way to go in regards to the amount of performance you get for the price.

The system you setup is very similar to my gaming rig. I'm currently using a 2500k (@4.3GHz) on a Corsair H100 water cooler, a Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 with 8GB (Patriot PXD38G1600LLK DDR3 1600), 120GB SSD (Corsair GT), 2x WD10EURS (1TB each in Raid 0), 2x GTX 570's, Corsair HX850 PSU, Cooler Master HAX 932 (Full Tower) and a Lite-On DVD-RW.

I have my OS and many games installed on my SSD (roughly 8, but WoW takes up a lot), with the remainder of apps or lesser played games on my spinner HDDs. I'm happy with the 120GB SSD. The WD standard hard drive you're looking at is better than the ones I have, you should be happy with that.

If I could change a few things with my system, I might look into a little higher quality MB. The Asus you chose is great! Also, I would probably go with the new 2550k cpu, which is a little faster from the factory but doesn't have an on-board gpu. Obviously, if I were purchasing a video card I would wait for the GTX 600 series... I prefer Nvidia.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This is the headset I'm using, and very pleased with:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The keyboard I use (works great for RPG's and FPS but takes a week or so to get used to):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My Mouse (Can normally be found for around $47-50):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I only list all this because you seem to be going for a very similar rig. I will tell you there is nothing I cannot run max'd out @ 1920x1200 (Samsung T260 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...). Production applications are lightning fast and, as far as gaming goes, this is all the system I need. All in all I'm probably around the same price range you're looking at now, but you can substitute your preference of components in as you see fit. You'll be very happy with your system!
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 2:22:12 AM

^ Lol, liquid cooling has an air cooler equivalent that is quieter and much safer to use. What are you basing your ridiculous claims on? Since when is the i5-2500k overkill for gaming? It is the best bang for buck. I suggest researching more before giving false information.
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March 19, 2012 2:23:31 AM

Quote:

"Um... what? The 2500K is a great CPU don't get me wrong but if you have a $2K plus budget to work with, X79 will be far more future-proof than Z68 and P67 will be in the long run, and on higher end builds I try to be as future-proof as possible."

The i5 2500K is and will be overkill bill for a long time to come and IMO the money saved could be put towards even a cable sleeving kit or Liquid cooling loop that can be carried over to his future rigs as cornerstone pieces.[/quote said:


I'm pretty sure g-unit was simply making the point that it is a faster cpu, and at a $2500 budget, it would probably work very well for him. The 3820 does have a track record of being faster than the i7-2700k and being able to overclock as high.

The issue I had with the CPU's above the 2500k was that the performance I would have gained simply didn't justify the extra money. The 2600k and 2700k were both available when i purchased my 2500k, I simply couldn't justify the extra $100+. That was my preference though... I also didn't spend the extra $300 to go with 2x GTX 580s instead of my 570s.

Mvee18, what games are you planning on playing? Also, what resolution is your monitor and are you going to be running multiple monitors for gaming?
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 2:38:03 AM

You think proper cooling of the processor will get stressed? The ONLY way to ruin a processor is by not having proper heatsink fan on the CPU to cool it, so your point is moot. Getting an i5-2500k on his budget will NEVER make the GPU underpowered.
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March 19, 2012 2:45:22 AM

Hey hey! Okay, chillllllllll out.

For Ironwilly's question; I will be playing games like SC 2, BF3, MW3, Metro 2033, WOW, Civ 5, Skyrim.

I have 2 1080p monitors.

@G-unit1111; Please excuse my ignorance to the fact that it could be overclocked. Your build looks pretty nice, although, I may want to switch out some of the components, and was my build complete crap?
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a c 279 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 2:58:37 AM

Quote:

"Um... what? The 2500K is a great CPU don't get me wrong but if you have a $2K plus budget to work with, X79 will be far more future-proof than Z68 and P67 will be in the long run, and on higher end builds I try to be as future-proof as possible."

The i5 2500K is and will be overkill bill for a long time to come and IMO the money saved could be put towards even a cable sleeving kit or Liquid cooling loop that can be carried over to his future rigs as cornerstone pieces.[/quote said:


Cable sleeving kits are completely useless, IMO, and I don't touch liquid cooling on any build, as it has the potential to void many a warranty but do what you want.

The 2500K is the perfect CPU right now - it's not overkill. The 3820 is a pretty good alternative as X79 will be around a lot longer where Z68 and P67 are dead ends after Ivy (when it will be released... ?).

Quote:
@G-unit1111; Please excuse my ignorance to the fact that it could be overclocked. Your build looks pretty nice, although, I may want to switch out some of the components, and was my build complete crap?


Your build looks pretty good - you definitely have a good motherboard and GPU picked out, but I don't touch liquid cooling which is why I didn't recommend the H100, and that case is pretty decent, a similar suggestion if I may offer one is the Azza Hurricane 2000: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's a full tower case and I really like the front-loading HD bays. I've had some cases (like my crappy Apevia one) that made installing HDs the biggest chore and I always try to find cases where it's really easy to add / remove drives.

Quote:

I'm pretty sure g-unit was simply making the point that it is a faster cpu, and at a $2500 budget, it would probably work very well for him. The 3820 does have a track record of being faster than the i7-2700k and being able to overclock as high.

The issue I had with the CPU's above the 2500k was that the performance I would have gained simply didn't justify the extra money. The 2600k and 2700k were both available when i purchased my 2500k, I simply couldn't justify the extra $100+. That was my preference though... I also didn't spend the extra $300 to go with 2x GTX 580s instead of my 570s.


1. Yeah I'll definitely recommend the 3820 over the 2700K - the 2700K is a moot point and a marketing gimmick as Intel knows that high-end users will want the fastest speeds they can get but everyone knows that the 2600K can clock way faster than the 2700K can.

2. True for the most part - I didn't recommend the 3930K for that reason as it'll be *YEARS* before games catch up to hex-core technology. They're just beginning to catch up to quad core and they'll certainly be a while before catching up to hyperthreading or using all CPU cores to their advantage.

Quote:
For a gaming rig put the money into GPUs when you already have an is 2500K end of story.


While I agree with that for the most part, with X79 you get full PCI-E 3.0 support out of the box with no need to upgrade to Ivy, which was the point I was originally trying to make. If you have the best GPU on the market, you want to use it to it's full potential, am I right? You don't want to water it down with a CPU that can't utilize it to it's full potential.
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March 19, 2012 2:58:53 AM

Mvee18.... you are pretty much in the exact same boat as me. I play all of those, with the exception of Civ 5 and Metro 2033. I also have Fear 3, Rage, Kingdoms of Amalur, Torchlight, Alan Wake, Mass Effect 1-3, and Trine 2 currently installed. I also run a second monitor, but it's a 1080p TV and I don't (typically) use it when I'm gaming.

If you saw my system specs that I posted, you'll see that I am probably right at the same budget and very similar specs, with the only major difference being the video cards. I will say, a single 7970 (or GTX 680) will be enough to impress you with the rest of the components you chose. If you use both monitors for gaming, AMD may have the slight edge. Eyefinity 2 is absolutely amazing for multi-monitor setups.

Whether you want to go with the LGA 2011 CPUs or the 1155s, you won't be disappointed. If it is between buying a more expensive CPU or buying a better GPU: spend your money on the GPU, hands down! That is where a gaming system is made, and neither of the Intels you're looking at will disappoint!
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March 19, 2012 3:09:03 AM

So, what CPU are you guys recommending, the 2500K or the 3820?
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March 19, 2012 3:17:03 AM

Quote:
[The 2500K would be a great CPU for a gaming rig and there is really no need to spend more than $200 on a CPU for even the highest end gaming rig and as the resolution goes up the CPU usage goes down which brings me to my next point OP would do well to invest into a 2560x1440 monitor.


You're kind of contradicting yourself here man. On one hand you're saying that spending more money on a CPU isn't a good idea, but you're recommending he use a monitor that is going to cost $800-1000. I don't think this guy is a professional gamer and he doesn't sound like he's a graphic designer; what on earth does he need a monitor of that resolution for?

While I see your point about the 2500k, also keep in mind that the LGA 2011 MBs can use hexa-core CPU's. This is something the LGA 1155 MBs simply cannot do, making the X79 a more upgradable platform... g-unit knows what he's talking about.
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March 19, 2012 3:22:18 AM

You are correct, I'm going to go with g-unit's CPU/Mobo. For the prof. gamer and gfx designer assumptions, you are correct. :) 
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March 19, 2012 3:24:58 AM

It's not that the 2500k is a bad CPU, Ironwilly's point is that 1155 boards cannot support hex-core. Therefore, it would be less cost to upgrade in the future.
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a c 279 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 3:40:28 AM

Quote:
2544046,27,944741 said:
Cable sleeving kits are completely useless, IMO, and I don't touch liquid cooling on any build, as it has the potential to void many a warranty but do what you want.

The 2500K is the perfect CPU right now - it's not overkill. The 3820 is a pretty good alternative as X79 will be around a lot longer where Z68 and P67 are dead ends after Ivy (when it will be released... ?).

Well In Your Opinion ^ IMHO cable management represents your character and pride in your ownership of a beautiful rig and I like mine sleeved and nice and clean. Liquid cooling for me is all about ultra low temps and low noise and I have never had to make good on a warranty in over 10 years of rig building. The 2500K would be a great CPU for a gaming rig and there is really no need to spend more than $200 on a CPU for even the highest end gaming rig and as the resolution goes up the CPU usage goes down which brings me to my next point OP would do well to invest into a 2560x1440 monitor.
said:


I've been doing this since the mid-90's and I've had plenty of parts fail on me - including an entire motherboard or two, and if I want something replaced I want it replaced now - and if it's damaged by water you can't return it.

I definitely agree that cable management can make or break a build - I generally route all my cables behind the motherboard tray and I purchase cases that allow me to do so.

Quote:
It's not that the 2500k is a bad CPU, Ironwilly's point is that 1155 boards cannot support hex-core. Therefore, it would be less cost to upgrade in the future.


My point is that after the dust is settled with Ivy, Z68 and P67 will be dead ends. X79 will be around for the next couple of years and it will take advantage of PCI 3.0. If you have the best video card on the market, would you really want it watered down with a motherboard that can't support it out of the box? To me there's nothing that sucks worse than having to buy the same part twice and I'd rather be future-proof now than having to buy two CPUs. That's my opinion.

Quote:
While I see your point about the 2500k, also keep in mind that the LGA 2011 MBs can use hexa-core CPU's. This is something the LGA 1155 MBs simply cannot do, making the X79 a more upgradable platform... g-unit knows what he's talking about.


I've been building / tweaking computers since I was 15 and I've got quite a bit of experience doing this. Future-proofing a build is nearly impossible but you certainly don't want to go dead end on a high-end build.
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March 19, 2012 4:08:31 AM

g-unit1111 said:

My point is that after the dust is settled with Ivy, Z68 and P67 will be dead ends. X79 will be around for the next couple of years and it will take advantage of PCI 3.0. If you have the best video card on the market, would you really want it watered down with a motherboard that can't support it out of the box? To me there's nothing that sucks worse than having to buy the same part twice and I'd rather be future-proof now than having to buy two CPUs. That's my opinion.


Just to be fair, they have revised the Z68 boards to take advantage of PCIE 3.0.

I prefer the term future-ready when building a new system. Meaning it supports all the standards of today and as many of tomorrows as possible. Certainly building a system where you can possibly get a second CPU upgrade at some point in the future, without a complete new MB, is a blessing.

@Haliburton:
Nobody is criticizing your advice. I was merely trying to help mvee18, since he seemed to have similar expectations as I did when I was building my system. The fact of the matter is, you can purchase three 24" monitors and a nice stand for them @ the same cost as a 2560x1600 monitor. It's just not practical for most people, and really the advantage is minimal unless you absolutely need it for your professional well-being. I wasn't saying that it wouldn't look better than a lower resolution monitor, obviously it would. Another display option that is really is cool multiple projectors or this:

http://www.crvd.com/

But I'm not spending $6500 on that either! :) 
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a c 279 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 4:22:58 AM

Ironwilly said:
Just to be fair, they have revised the Z68 boards to take advantage of PCIE 3.0.

I prefer the term future-ready when building a new system. Meaning it supports all the standards of today and as many of tomorrows as possible. Certainly building a system where you can possibly get a second CPU upgrade at some point in the future, without a complete new MB, is a blessing.

@Haliburton:
Nobody is criticizing your advice. I was merely trying to help mvee18, since he seemed to have similar expectations as I did when I was building my system. The fact of the matter is, you can purchase three 24" monitors and a nice stand for them @ the same cost as a 2560x1600 monitor. It's just not practical for most people, and really the advantage is minimal unless you absolutely need it for your professional well-being. I wasn't saying that it wouldn't look better than a lower resolution monitor, obviously it would. Another display option that is really is cool multiple projectors or this:

http://www.crvd.com/

But I'm not spending $6500 on that either! :) 


$6500???? :ouch:  :ouch:  :ouch:  :ouch:  :ouch:  :ouch: 

Quote:
Sorry Chief I should have been more specific and said that since I have started building liquid cooled rigs 10years ago I have never had a damaged computer part from a leaking loop of course I check and double check and use hose clamps on top of barbs.


I always try to play it safe with my builds - I don't have the money to replace something if it goes wrong - I'm sure many people here don't, but that's just the way I do things and it always works fine for me, I prefer air cooling way more over water cooling.
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March 19, 2012 4:28:27 AM

I'm almost 90% positive you're just trolling at this point. Either that or you're not comprehending what anyone is saying, as you seem to disagree with all of it and take it personally.

Before you mentioned a 2560x1440 monitor, which is typically $800-1000. Now you're talking about a 2560x1600 monitor, which ranges from $1200-2000. Mvee18 is looking for a $2500 computer for gaming and general use. Who spends half their budget of their gaming computer on a monitor? It doesn't make sense. I think everyone is aware of the advantages of more pixels, you seem oblivious to the concept of cost vs. value, however, unless it comes to a $100 difference in CPU.

If you don't understand this, I apologize... I really can't explain it any better. As I stated, I was simply trying to help mvee18, not get into a monitor discussion or be trolled. Good day to you sir.
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March 19, 2012 4:33:28 AM

There is a huge difference between being a troll and trolling bro... relax. Everything is ok! :) 
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March 19, 2012 4:41:52 AM





I'm done here. Mvee18, message me if you need other info you think I can help with. :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 4:54:01 AM

G-unit usually posts great advice, but his view is usually that whatever he does is the best way to look at things, which isn't that bad, but it is still something. :p 
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 5:26:16 AM

You are absolutely right. With 1000 remaining, he can get an i5-2500k, ASUS P8Z68-V/Gen3 MOBO, a 120GB Mushkin Enhanced Chronos SSD, 8GB total DDR3 RAM, 850W XFX Core850 PSU, and a 500GB HDD.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 5:39:40 AM

I am going to be doing the same, but I will get a Dell U2412M and run Eyefinity (3) with CF Radeon 7950s.
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March 19, 2012 6:02:17 AM

Again Haliburton, you're now talking about a completely different system.

Instead of running with the two 1080p monitors he has now and the best video card on the market that CAN max them out, the system you are suggesting would have a quarter of the HDD space and a monitor resolution so high that he couldn't play the games he wants to at anywhere near their "Ultra" settings. What's even worse, he'll still be running at less than 60 FPS on average in games like BF3, Skyrim, WoW and Metro 2033.... all these games he says he plays.

If you cannot max out the details, you're diminishing the returns of having such a high resolution monitor to begin with. If you need to have an additional $500 video card, you're talking about a $3000 system at the very least. Plus I don't think you've factored in he also wants to purchase a new case, headset, keyboard and mouse.

My best suggestion, if you are indeed trying to help, is to price out a system for him and rationalize it with facts. I completely agree that running a 2560x1440, or higher, monitor provides a superior gaming experience. I don't agree, however, that spending $1000 on a monitor and $1500 on the rest of a system is going to allow for the best possible experience. And if you have to upgrade in a few months anyway, what is the purpose. This is purely my perspective, perhaps OP agrees with you instead.

I will acknowledge that you present a unique perspective and that HD+ gaming is a very cool experience. I will also say, however, that using a tri-monitor gaming setup offers even more than a HD+ monitor, and would be much less expensive.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 6:07:35 AM

he can get a 1600 monitor and also a kickass gaming machine in 2.5k$ :D 
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 6:08:30 AM

i to want to build a gaming machine but with more bigger budget i waould make a new thread :lol: 
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March 19, 2012 6:24:15 AM

Again, you're choosing to disagree with me instead of add validity to what you're saying.

Here are benchmarks of the 7950 on a 2560x1600 monitor for BF3 with an overclocked i7-3960k:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-7950-over...

I realize it's not the same resolution, but it's difficult to find a 2560x1440 resolution review.

You are now looking at purchasing a slower CPU on a less upgradable chipset, having less hard drive space and a lesser video card, all to run a monitor resolution that you can't even run @ 60 FPS in SINGLE player BF3.... forget about multiplayer.

So, how does this make sense? Just saying, "because I'm right and you're wrong," doesn't make a difference.

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March 19, 2012 6:31:06 AM

And that benchmark is average FPS... if it is averaging less that 60 FPS, you know it isn't running smooth at all.

So, what you would have to do is turn the detail settings down (You cannot turn the resolution down, it would look like crap and then why even have an HD+). This further negates the logic for buying a HD+ monitor for a gaming PC in this price range. BF3 has been out for 6mon+, in a year there will be games out that are even more beautiful and demanding.
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March 19, 2012 6:36:07 AM

For the system g-unit configured, he logically gave reasons for why he chose the components and it make perfect sense for OP's budget and pre-existing hardware.

You don't have to convince me that higher resolutions are more beautiful and better for gaming. That was never the topic here. I believe you, you are right.

Simply put, either try to help the OP with his system or stop making false claims. I have nothing riding on this, it's irrelevant to me whether you prove me wrong or not. But just blurting out random information means nothing.
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March 19, 2012 6:39:28 AM

Quote:
Who are you talking to the air ?


Was simply trying to get you to prove a point instead of throwing out random claims.
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March 19, 2012 6:46:04 AM

So, because BF3 SINGLE player is heavily reliant on the GPU and shows minimal difference between 2-cores and 8-cores, the OP should buy a 2500k and spend $1000 on a monitor? Never mind that, as you just posted, he won't be able to run at a smooth framerate for that one game. What he does see will be beautiful and make gaming better. I understand now the point you are trying to make.

This just brings me back to what I was saying earlier, that you are either just trolling or have no idea what you're talking about.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 6:53:58 AM

the op wont need to have a 600 $ cpu to play games at ultra resolution but a 600$ gpu or maybe 2 of them

the point is will a high end cpu give a significant increase in fps instead of high end gpu ?

the answer is no.



the op would need something like

intel i5 2500k
cm hyper 212 evo
asrock z68 extreme4 gen3
mushkin 2x4 gb 1600mhz cas 8 ddr3
sapphire hd 7970 3gb oc edition
wd carvier blue 500gb 7200 rpm
mushkin 128 gb sata3 ssd
seasonic x 850 80+ gold psu
cm storm trooper full tower
asus 24x dvd burner
windows 7 pro oem

this would go above 1.5k and if you get that cpu at microcenter then you can get it with 50$ off

and buy a 30" monitor :lol: 



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March 19, 2012 7:05:28 AM

I'm currently using a 2500k and I love it. The 3820 is faster... I don't know what is so hard to understand about that. The LGA 2011 MB's support the 6-core cpus, the 1155s don't.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/core-i7-3820-processor-re...

To run a 27-30 in monitor @ 2560-1440+ you would sacrifice using a second monitor for gaming (losing screen area) and you'd be force to run most modern games at a lower detail setting, many without even being able to use AA or multi-sampling.

It's all a judgement call really. That's all it boils down to.
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March 19, 2012 7:10:09 AM

Again Haliburton, you keep saying things like "I do believe" but you don't seem to want to make valid anything you say. The 2500k is a very good gaming CPU, I use it and love it.

I'm just of the opinion that if you have to go with a slower, by however small or large amount, less upgrade-able system to accommodate a monitor that you can't even run @ max detail at its native resolution and will likely have to go outside your budget to make full use of in the future, then you are not spending your money wisely.
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March 19, 2012 7:19:02 AM

I already covered that point.

4147200 (2x 1080P) vs. 4096000 (Single 2560x1600) ~ 1% difference, lose 21-25 inch of screen. Plus the system you suggested had a 7950 instead of a 7970 as well as a slower CPU.

Again, it's a judgement call. If you were talking about a $5000 desktop with a trio of 30" monitors.... sure, that's a great way to spend $10,000.

If I were building a system for $2500, I'd much rather have a 3-4 monitor setup @ 1920x1080 per monitor and turn down the details than a single 30". To each his own, I'm tired of discussing this, however.
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March 19, 2012 7:22:16 AM

Quote:
Once again CPU matters even much less at HD+ resolutions do some research man CPU utilization goes down when the resolution goes up end of story mate i5 2500K is more than enough for any high end gaming.


Again, you're 100% wrong and still lack any proof of anything you say, but tell me to do research. On top of that, no two games are the same... there are a lot of games, Skyrim being a prime example, where your CPU is everything.

I'm trying to get out of "Youngster" status on these forums and tonight made a dent in that :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 7:28:56 AM

I would buy a 30" monitor instead of 3 1080 monitors of 23" becau

se those monitors are fugly i mean the screen is tn and i personally prefer ips even it is of 7 ms its ok any thing above it i start noticingit which irritates me
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2012 7:36:38 AM

Newer ips monitors are faster and better
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!