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Suitable flash for a Canon 300D camera?

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June 10, 2005 3:02:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
420EX?
With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?
Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
that shown on the Canon accessories page?

I owned a National PE-2850 flash gun in the past and it gave natural
light with warm skin tones. Would I likely get the from either of the
flashes I named?

Regards Brian
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 3:02:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> writes:

> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain
> by buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
> 420EX?

With both: More power. With the 420EX: Swivel and tilt.

> With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?

Less likely. Both flashes will put more distance between lens and
flash, which reduces redeye. If you bounce the 420EX of a low, white
ceiling instead of firing it directly in the face of your subject,
there should be no redeye and also softer light.

> Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
> that shown on the Canon accessories page?

You can buy other brands. Take a look at this webpage to see what
is available:
http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/flash.html

> I owned a National PE-2850 flash gun in the past and it gave natural
> light with warm skin tones. Would I likely get the from either of
> the flashes I named?

Whit digital, this is less critical, you can always adhust the WB
in post-processing. But I own a 420EX and two 550EX, and am very
happy with the light they provide.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 3:02:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <rr7ga1dtek7pud23j5340cdcnkqmocg98m@4ax.com>, Brian
<bclark@es.co.nz> writes
>My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
>buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
>420EX?
>With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?
>Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
>that shown on the Canon accessories page?
>

Before you buy anything other than the Canon flashes make sure that all
the functions work. I tried a Jessops (UK photo retailer) own-brand
flash and it appeared to have a lot of incompatibilities. I can't
remember all the details now, but I know I ended up with a 420EX. Nearly
twice the price, but then, it's only money!

Regards
--
Neil Pugh
Related resources
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 3:02:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brian wrote:
> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
> buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
> 420EX?

- More power, especially for the 420EX (useful for the next feature, or
for distant subjects, or to light the shadows of a brightly lit
scene...)
- For the 420EX only, the ability to bounce the flash on the ceiling
(if any ;o) or whatever you want.

> With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?

With direct flash you will get a bit less of red-eyes, with bouncing
flash absolutely none (and a soft, pleasing light if the ceiling is
white).

> Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
> that shown on the Canon accessories page?

The question does not seem really easy...
Some 3rd party strobes work perfect and some Canon strobes (I've heard
that is especially true of the EZ series) definitely not.
There seems to be many, many, many differents kinds of TTL metering out
there, often not compatible with the 300d.
For sure, the Speedlite EX series are compatible, but be careful with
other TTL strobes.

FYI, a good level of compatibility is achieved with old (& now cheap!)
auto/thrystors strobes : the strobes calculates exposition on its own,
with an internal sensor, avoiding so any TTL conflict.
I'm very pleased to use my old Speedlite 533G on my 300d, for an
example.
You may also use your National strobe, if it belongs to the thrystors
category.


> I owned a National PE-2850 flash gun in the past and it gave natural
> light with warm skin tones. Would I likely get the from either of the
> flashes I named?

At 99% yes, and if not you can still fix the color cast during
post-processing (as said).

Greetings from France
Nicolas
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 3:02:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 12:02:29 +0100, Brian wrote:

> I owned a National PE-2850 flash gun in the past and it gave natural
> light with warm skin tones. Would I likely get the from either of the
> flashes I named?
>
Before using a National (Panasonic) PE series flash make sure it does not
have a high voltage trigger. Most of the National flashes are >6 volt and
can damage your 300D.

--

Gautam Majumdar

Please send e-mails to gmajumdar@freeuk.com
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 3:02:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <rr7ga1dtek7pud23j5340cdcnkqmocg98m@4ax.com>,
Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
> buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
> 420EX?

The built-in flash in the 300D is suitable only for short distances and
the flash has a very narrow field of coverage. Try shooting the photos
you prefer with the built-in flash and see if it meets your needs. Only
you will know if you need a more powerful flash.

> With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?

Yes, of course. Read up about what causes red eye to understand
the situation better.

> Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
> that shown on the Canon accessories page?

Several companies make third party flash units that are compatible with
the 300D, but I personally prefer to stick with all Canon accessories
for my 300D. What you really need to decide is what your needs are and
what your budget is and than go from there. It is entirely possible that
you might be fine with just the 300D's built-in flash. That being said,
I have the 420EX and I am happy with it.
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 4:02:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brian wrote:
> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
> buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
> 420EX?
> With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?
> Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
> that shown on the Canon accessories page?
>

Since no one else's mentioned it, let me do it. Consider two more
non-Canon flashes:
- Sigma EF 500 Super ($175-$200)
- Sunpak PZ5000 ($150)

- Siddhartha
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 6:01:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gautam Majumdar wrote:
> Before using a National (Panasonic) PE series flash make sure it does not
> have a high voltage trigger. Most of the National flashes are >6 volt and
> can damage your 300D.

Ooooops! I forgot this issue, and it can be critical. Thanks to remind
it!

According to http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html , National
strobes are, regarding this point, NOT compatible with canon digicams
such as the 300d.

The one you own is not listed, so you could try to measure the trigger
voltage to be sure, but without further information it would be unwise
to try it directly on your camera.
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 12:56:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <vkdia15hk1airku4lsnmki9c622qcb7gj0@4ax.com>, Brian
<bclark@es.co.nz> writes
>
>Thanks Neil and others for your replies.
>
>I have a few questions about the Speedlite 420EX Flash:
>Does it have it's own batteries or does it get it's power from the
>camera's battery?
>If it has it's own battery is it a rechargeable battery?
>Does the flash receive light bounched off the subject to tell the
>camera the correct exposure?
>Is the flash fast at charging up?
>Does the flash power off automatically if not used for about 90
>seconds?
>To use the wireless sensor with the flash do I need to buy extra
>equipment?

See

http://www.usa.canon.com/html/cameras_speedlite/420ex.h...

Regards
--
Neil Pugh
June 10, 2005 10:50:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Neil Pugh <neil@wallacepugh.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>In message <rr7ga1dtek7pud23j5340cdcnkqmocg98m@4ax.com>, Brian
><bclark@es.co.nz> writes
>>My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
>>buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
>>420EX?
>>With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?
>>Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
>>that shown on the Canon accessories page?
>>
>
>Before you buy anything other than the Canon flashes make sure that all
>the functions work. I tried a Jessops (UK photo retailer) own-brand
>flash and it appeared to have a lot of incompatibilities. I can't
>remember all the details now, but I know I ended up with a 420EX. Nearly
>twice the price, but then, it's only money!
>
>Regards

Thanks Neil and others for your replies.

I have a few questions about the Speedlite 420EX Flash:
Does it have it's own batteries or does it get it's power from the
camera's battery?
If it has it's own battery is it a rechargeable battery?
Does the flash receive light bounched off the subject to tell the
camera the correct exposure?
Is the flash fast at charging up?
Does the flash power off automatically if not used for about 90
seconds?
To use the wireless sensor with the flash do I need to buy extra
equipment?

Regards Brian
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 10:50:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> writes:
> I have a few questions about the Speedlite 420EX Flash:

> Does it have it's own batteries or does it get it's power from the
> camera's battery?

It uses 4 AA cells.

> If it has it's own battery is it a rechargeable battery?

You can buy and use rechargeable AA-cells.

> Does the flash receive light bounched off the subject to tell the
> camera the correct exposure?

No, but the camera does, and use the information to control the
duration of the flash. Canon calls this E-TTL.

> Is the flash fast at charging up?

Max. charge time is 8 seconds with fresh batteries if fully discarged.
YMMV.

> Does the flash power off automatically if not used for about 90
> seconds?

Yes.

> To use the wireless sensor with the flash do I need to buy extra
> equipment?

Yes, you need to but a wireless trigger (e.g. the ST-E2 or a
580EX).
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 9:57:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Siddhartha Jain" <losttoy@gmail.com> writes:
> Brian wrote:

>> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain
>> by buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or
>> Speedlite 420EX?

> Since no one else's mentioned it, let me do it. Consider two more
> non-Canon flashes:
> - Sigma EF 500 Super ($175-$200)
> - Sunpak PZ5000 ($150)

The Sunpak does not have E-TTL support or auto, only manual. It is not
very suitable for a EOS 300D. If you go for the Sigma, make sure you
get the Sigma EF 500 *DG* Super - which is the version made to work
with the EOS 300D.

The dedicated flash system for Canon 300d uses something called
E-TTL. However, if you are on a limited budget, you may want
to go without E-TTL-support, and instead use a so-called
"auto" or even "manual" flash.


Introduction
------------

An E-TTL flash controls the power of the flash by measuring the amount
of light reflected by the scene through the camera lens (TTL = Through
The Lens). An so-called auto flash has a built-in sensor that do the
same thing. A manual flash does not measure light, but if it has
vari-power, you may adjust the power of the flash "by hand".

The main benefit of E-TTL is supposed to be accurate exposure
even when shooting fully automatic.

To be able to use E-TTL or TTL-II on a Canon body, you need an E-TTL
capable flash (all E-TTL capable flashes are also E-TTL II capable).

If your camera has a PC-interface, or if you buy a cheap hotshoe-to-
PC-adapter or a slave setup, you should be able to use any non-E-TTL
flash units in manual or auto mode.

Canon's E-TTL system is really designed for fill flash, and some think
that it gives less than consistent results when used as the main light
source. The same people argue that for main flash, auto will give you
better results.

Auto flash uses overall average exposure metering. It is predictable
and can be compensated with experience in difficult situations.

E-TTL tries to get best exposure for every situation. But it is still
far from that goal. To handle difficult situations, E-TTL messed up
easy situations. It is less predictable and less easy to understand
why it meters some scenes wrong.

Below, I discuss the avilable options. First, I run through the
possible E-TTL strobes from Canon and third parties, then I take
a look on how you can use non-E-TTL-flashes with Canon digital
cameras.

I would not recommend a unit with less power than the Canon 420EX
(GN 105ft/32m) or a Vivitar 283 (GN 120ft/37m) if you want an useable
bounce, and this may be stressing it. Depending upon imager
sensitivity, room size, distance to ceiling, ceiling whiteness,
etc. you may need even more power to get good results with bounce
flash.


E-TTL
-----

E-TTL and E-TTL II is the name Canon's metering system for digital
cameras and replaces the earlier TTL and A-TTL systems. Neither the
original TTL nor A-TTL work with digital cameras, but the older EZ
Speedlites can be used in manual mode (see below).

E-TTL II is an improvement upon Canon's original E-TTL where the focus
distance as reported by the lens is also taken into account to compute
flash output (similar to Nikon's i-TTL system). Because the
difference between E-TTL and E-TTL-II is in the body, not the strobe,
any E-TTL capable flash will give you E-TTL II metering when put on a
E-TTL II capable EOS body (e.g. 350D, 20D, 1Ds Mk II).

Here is a list of the flash guns I am aware of that are E-TTL-compa-
tible (sort off).

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model GN Z Notes
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Canon 220EX (22) - No tilt/swivel
2. Metz 28 AF-3C (25) Z No tilt/swivel. Rev. eng. E-TTL.
3 Sunpak PZ40X-CA (30) Z Rev. eng. E-TTL. No swivel. Vari-p.
4. Canon 380EX (31) Z No swivel (discontinued 2001)
5. Promaster 7500DX (31) Z Rev. eng. E-TTL. Auto.
6. Canon 420EX (32) Z W/l slave.
7. Metz 44 AF-4C (34) Z Rev. eng. E-TTL.
8. Sigma 500 DG Super (40) Z W/l master + slave. Rev. eng.
9. Metz 54 AF-1C (40) Z Rev. eng. E-TTL.
10. Metz 54 MZ + SCA-3102 (40) Z Rev. eng. E-TTL. Auto.
11. Canon 550EX (42) Z W/l master + slave. Vari-P
12. Canon 580EX (42) Z W/l master + slave. Vari-p
13. Quantum Qflash T4d (48) C Rev. eng. E-TTL. Vari-p.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Models are sorted by maximum guide number (in meters, for ISO 100).
Note that for flashes with zoom (Z) or changable reflector (C)
the guide number (GN) is for f=50mm (135 film FOV). Most manufacturers
these days like to list GN with the zoom at f=105mm. For flashes
without zoom, GN is whatever the manufacturer lists. Note that
this does not always tell the full story. For example, the 220EX
and the 420EX has around the same GN (22) at the wide angle end
(f=24mm) but the 420EX appear more powerful because you can zoom the
refelector. If you want all the technical details, see the
manufacturers' specification sheets.

In addition to Canon's own models, I've listed some third party flash
guns claimed by their manufacturer to be "Canon digital" compatible.
These third party guns use reverse engineered interfaces for E-TTL
compatibility. The Quantum T4d has an excellent reputation, is
generally rated higher that Canon's own guns (it is not cheap tho').
The Sigma 500 DG Super has a fair reputation for E-TTL compatibility,
but someone reported that it is more reliable on channel 3 than the
other channels. There are mixed reports on how well the Metz models
work with E-TTL, and the data on Metz own website
( http://www.metz.de/en/ ) is not very clear. For instance, the FAQ
page states:
"All current Canon digital cameras with a hot shoe feature so-called
E-TTL flash control in place of the standard TTL flash control.
Fully automatic operation with these cameras requires flash units
that feature this particular flash mode, namely Metz mecablitz
44-AF 4C and Metz mecablitz 54 MZ. The Metz mecablitz 54-MZ model,
however, will usually require the SCA-3102 M2 adapter."
The data sheets for the individual flash guns list however two more
Metz strobes with E-TTL support: The 28 AF-3C and 54 AF-1C. I assume
the FAQ is not up to date (the current adapter is M3). The Metz 54 MZ
has a reputation for an excellent auto mode that many believe
are more reliable than E-TTL. It gets the aperture from the camera
automatically, so you do not have to set anything. This auto flash is
as easy to use as E-TTL. Metz is AFAIK the only major manufacturer that
let you have both E-TTL and auto in the same unit.
The Sunpak PZ40X has also good reviews for compatibility, and offers
variable power (vari-p) in addition to E-TTL. Promaster is a new
entry and I've haven't seen any reports on it yet, but it also
provides auto.

Most of the zoom head flashes don't take crop factors into account
when zooming. This is not a problem with Canon compact cameras
because their interface seemlessly convert actual focal lengths to 135
film FOV - but it is a problem with "cropped" dSLR bodies such as the
Canon EOS 20D. The 580EX was supposed to fix this, but Canon got it
wrong so it only works at f=24mm or above. Below, you get severe
vignetting unless you turn off the crop-factor adjustment feature.

The Sigma and all the Canons except the 220 EX and 380 EX can be used
in a infrared wireless (w/l) master/slave setup (the 420 EX as slave
only) and are compatible with Canon's wireless transmitter ST-E2.


Auto / manual
-------------

As noted in the introduction, you can use any flashgun you like with
Canon digital cameras as long as you run them out of the PC-interface
or via a slave setup. Most generic non-E-TTL flashes also work in the
hotshoe, but some dedicated flashes (e.g. older Canons EZ flash guns
and Nikon Speedlights) will not fire from the hotshoe, but work fine
with a PC-connector or slave trigger.

My preferred set-up for using non E-TTL flashes on my Canon Powershot
G5 (which have no PC-connector) is to use a very cheap chinese radio
slave. For details, see:
http://heim.ifi.uio.no/~gisle/photo/gt301b.html .

CAUTION: Be careful and measure the trigger voltage before using a
non-E-TTL flashes on a Canon digital camera. Some flashes, and in
particular vintage editions of the popular Vivitars, have trigger
voltages that may do serious damage to a modern camera. For details
see: http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html . Wein sells a
device (safe-sync) to protect against excessive trigger voltages, but
in my opinion, using a slave trigger is a just as easy and more
flexible.

Because of the E-TTL pre-flash, conventional optical slaves triggered
by the camera's built-in flash is tricky to use. However, if you use
a non-E-TTL flash as an optical master, or if you use a radio slave
setup as described above, the E-TTL pre-flesh will not fire and things
will work out just as simple as it did with film.

The manual / auto route will allow you to use any pre-digital flash
guns you may have left over from your film days, as well as use any
non-dedicated flashguns you might have left over from shooting film or
may pick up cheap from garage sales, etc. For instance, if you don't
want to spend the $180 a Speedlite 420EX (GN 32) will cost you, the
more powerful Vivitar 283 or 285 (GN 37) will cost only about $70
brand new, and used models can be had for a lot less than that.

Auto flashes fill take care of metering themselves, and if set up
correctly, they will be just as reliable as E-TTL in giving the right
output for correct exposure. You just set up the camera in manual
mode, select sync. speed and aperture, set the aperture you use on the
flash's exposure meter, and let the flashgun control the exposure.

To use a manual flash, you need to compute the aperture from the
flash's guide number. It is no big deal to do this after you've
gotten used to it, but it may slow doen your action. If you don't
want to perform this step, make sure to get a flash with an auto-mode.
Note thet most Canon Speedlites does not have an auto mode. Some have
vari-power, but that is no substitute for auto.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 10:42:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gisle Hannemyr wrote:
> The dedicated flash system for Canon 300d uses something called
> E-TTL. However, if you are on a limited budget, you may want
> to go without E-TTL-support, and instead use a so-called
> "auto" or even "manual" flash.
>
>
> Introduction
> ------------
> [...]

Wow! Impressive.
Thank you for such a complete review of the subject!


> Note thet most Canon Speedlites does not have an auto mode.

My Speedlite 533G (dedicated for the A1, quite a few years ago...) does
have it, as does the 577G (with a bit more power). But just after
(1985?), Canon went for TTL metering.
Btw, these two strobes share a great feature : the auto sensor is built
in the hotshoe connector, and then a flexible 1.5m phone-style cord
links it to the strobe unit. You can put the flash away from the
camera, the exposure will still be rightly computed.
June 11, 2005 5:31:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Siddhartha Jain" <losttoy@gmail.com> wrote:

>Brian wrote:
>> My Canon EOS300D has a built in flash. What advantages would I gain by
>> buying an external flash such as the Speedlite 220EX or Speedlite
>> 420EX?
>> With either of these flashes would I still get red eye?
>> Can I buy other brands of flashes or do they have to be the flashes
>> that shown on the Canon accessories page?
>>
>
>Since no one else's mentioned it, let me do it. Consider two more
>non-Canon flashes:
>- Sigma EF 500 Super ($175-$200)
>- Sunpak PZ5000 ($150)
>
>- Siddhartha

Thanks Siddhartha.
Is there a reason why you choose those flash's?
Is it be cause of price or features?

Regards Brian
June 11, 2005 5:36:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nikojorj_jaimepaslapub@yahoo.Fr wrote:

>Gautam Majumdar wrote:
>> Before using a National (Panasonic) PE series flash make sure it does not
>> have a high voltage trigger. Most of the National flashes are >6 volt and
>> can damage your 300D.
>
>Ooooops! I forgot this issue, and it can be critical. Thanks to remind
>it!
>
>According to http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html , National
>strobes are, regarding this point, NOT compatible with canon digicams
>such as the 300d.
>
>The one you own is not listed, so you could try to measure the trigger
>voltage to be sure, but without further information it would be unwise
>to try it directly on your camera.

Thanks Nikojorj for the warning.
I've used this Flash on my Canon 300 35mm film camera with an special
attachment that fits on the bottom of the flash. But like you say the
trigger voltage could be different on the Canon 300D digital camera.

It's a pity flashes are so expensive to buy. The cost of the 420EX
flash is about one third the price of the camera.

Regards Brian
Anonymous
June 14, 2005 8:16:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nikojorj_jaimepaslapub@yahoo.Fr wrote:
> Gisle Hannemyr wrote:
> > The dedicated flash system for Canon 300d uses something called
> > E-TTL. However, if you are on a limited budget, you may want
> > to go without E-TTL-support, and instead use a so-called
> > "auto" or even "manual" flash.
> >
> >
> > Introduction
> > ------------
> > [...]
>
> Wow! Impressive.
> Thank you for such a complete review of the subject!
>
>

It would've been simpler to just post the source :-)
http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/
http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index2.html
http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index3.html

- Siddhartha
Anonymous
June 14, 2005 6:20:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Siddhartha Jain" <losttoy@gmail.com> writes:
> nikojorj_jaimepaslapub@yahoo.Fr wrote:
>> Gisle Hannemyr wrote:

>>> The dedicated flash system for Canon 300d uses something called
>>> E-TTL. However, if you are on a limited budget, you may want
>>> to go without E-TTL-support, and instead use a so-called
>>> "auto" or even "manual" flash.
>>>
>>>
>>> Introduction
>>> ------------
>>> [...]

>> Wow! Impressive.
>> Thank you for such a complete review of the subject!

> It would've been simpler to just post the source :-)
> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/
> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index2.html
> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index3.html

While the photonotes.org site you refer to covers the same /topic/ as
my write-up, the treatment is different. Since both deal with facts,
one shouldn't be surprised to find some of the same facts in both
texts - but we don't even list the same flashes as being E-TTL-compat-
ible (I believe that my data is more up-to-date and accurate than his,
but YMMV).

As a matter of fact, my write-up on Canon Flash compatibility /is/
pulled from a website. It is this one, and it has been around for
some time:

http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/flash.html

To accusse someone of plagiarism is a serious matter.

I think an apology is called for.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
June 14, 2005 8:20:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

so do I. I don't know if it is even about plagiarism. I just think
it is rude as hell to comment like that about anyone who contributes,
especially one who gives as often and as clearly as Gisle. I can not
tell you how much I have been helped by some of the his/her comments.
Plus their website. I just went through hell concerning flash guns
and the help I got with their links led me to solve th issue and now I
can do better at wedding and then the bride and groom are happier.
Your sharing of knowledge just keeps giving....... thanks.


On 14 Jun 2005 14:20:30 +0200, Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no>
wrote:

>"Siddhartha Jain" <losttoy@gmail.com> writes:
>> nikojorj_jaimepaslapub@yahoo.Fr wrote:
>>> Gisle Hannemyr wrote:
>
>>>> The dedicated flash system for Canon 300d uses something called
>>>> E-TTL. However, if you are on a limited budget, you may want
>>>> to go without E-TTL-support, and instead use a so-called
>>>> "auto" or even "manual" flash.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Introduction
>>>> ------------
>>>> [...]
>
>>> Wow! Impressive.
>>> Thank you for such a complete review of the subject!
>
>> It would've been simpler to just post the source :-)
>> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/
>> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index2.html
>> http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index3.html
>
>While the photonotes.org site you refer to covers the same /topic/ as
>my write-up, the treatment is different. Since both deal with facts,
>one shouldn't be surprised to find some of the same facts in both
>texts - but we don't even list the same flashes as being E-TTL-compat-
>ible (I believe that my data is more up-to-date and accurate than his,
>but YMMV).
>
>As a matter of fact, my write-up on Canon Flash compatibility /is/
>pulled from a website. It is this one, and it has been around for
>some time:
>
> http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/flash.html
>
>To accusse someone of plagiarism is a serious matter.
>
>I think an apology is called for.
>--
>- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
!