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3750k vs 2500k

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  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
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Last response: in CPUs
July 5, 2012 9:58:09 PM

[I meant to say 3570k in the title.]

Price is not an issue as they're both ~£170. I'd eventually want to overclock. Also, which one's better if you don't overclock? I've heard that if you want to overclock past 4.5ghz, the 2500k would be the better option? If you clocked the 3750k past 4.5ghz, what would happen? Would it be able to handle it? Another thing, I can't find a benchmark website that has the 3750k featured, is it because it's a new CPU?

Other specs:

HD7850
250GB HDD + 250GB external
8GB RAM

Thanks

More about : 3750k 2500k

a c 313 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 10:03:53 PM

The 3570k has higher clock, slightly higher IPC than the 2500k and much lower power at stock speed, which makes it the obvious winner for mild/no-overclock.
July 5, 2012 10:09:27 PM

InvalidError said:
The 3570k has higher clock, slightly higher IPC than the 2500k and much lower power at stock speed, which makes it the obvious winner for mild/no-overclock.


I'm guessing at moderate to large overclocking, they level out and the 2500k begins to have the edge?
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a c 81 à CPUs
July 5, 2012 11:03:38 PM

Nickel and dimes man if they're both the same price, then 3570k. If the 3570K is more expensive (which it is slightly at most stores here in the US), the 3570K doesn't deserve the extra money for a gamer.
a c 313 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 5:48:36 AM

aayjaay said:
I'm guessing at moderate to large overclocking, they level out and the 2500k begins to have the edge?

Pretty much. IB @ 4.2GHz is roughly equivalent to SB @ 4.5GHz.

IB still has lower power usage at that point though.
a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 11:01:16 AM

Seeing as how I don't own a 3570K, my observances are strictly observing others success in overclocking them, in comparison to overclocking a 2500K that I do have, and have successfully overclocked it to 5100mhz 24/7 stable. (But I have the cooling to allow that high of a stable clock.)

The most important thing is what are you cooling it with?

Your CPU cooling solution will totally determine your overclocking limits of either the 3570K or 2500K.
a b à CPUs
July 6, 2012 11:30:54 AM

What CPU cooler will you use? Speaking from experience, Ivy Bridge runs hot past 4.5GHz with some extra voltage. It doesn't produce a lot of heat, but the small die for dispersal and IHS not being soldered contribute to the high temps. With popular coolers such as the Hyper 212+ or EVO in push-pull, you're looking at high 70s and even up to 80s under load with a high overclock and voltage increase. My CPU @ 4.2GHz with 1.192V cooled by an Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 92mm Cooler idled in the high 30s, and under load, in the mid 70s after several hours in Prime95. during gaming, it hardly passes the 65C. Every chip is different, however. Just be aware of cooling and voltage.











a c 313 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 1:55:06 PM

4Ryan6 said:
Your CPU cooling solution will totally determine your overclocking limits of either the 3570K or 2500K.

Luck of the draw with the CPU and quality of the motherboard's VRM are every bit as important.
a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 5:28:55 PM

InvalidError said:
Luck of the draw with the CPU and quality of the motherboard's VRM are every bit as important.


I personally do not subscribe to the Luck of the Draw theory, many took that same point of view with the 2500K, but it was discovered that everyone willing to change the way they were overclocking it mysteriously got around the wall so many claimed there was.

The way they were overclocking their SBK was the very thing holding them back, and I'd venture to say it will probably be the same with the IB.

I'm chomping at the bit for an IB right now to put it to the test, but the wife surprised me with a SB 2700K, nice surprise too!

So a new IBK is on hold for now, even though she surprised me with the 2700K, we both have to pay for it.

Of course a motherboard could be a limiting factor but only if it wasn't even an overclocker and who in their right mind would buy either a SBK or IBK and not buy a good overclocking M/B to go with it!

So I stand by my first statement that CPU cooling will totally determine your overclocking limits of either the 3570K or 2500K, and I'll add, that how you overclock it in the first place can also be a limitation.
a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 5:37:51 PM

Quote:
VRM (phase management) has improved and with mid to higher end motherboards having like 8+2 control or higher.
good-overclocking abilities...

I've even seen lesser board like 4+2 and 4+1 do well but nothing like higher end boards nowadays.
I need to learn more on different phase control options I see in some BIOS's.

but as '4ryan6' knows, I'm not a hardcore overclocker..


UL why don't you consider writing a guide for a mid level overclock?

There are a lot here that want that type of overclock specifically laid out?

Your tweaking options are much greater below the 45x multiplier with the 2500K, once you start above the 45X memory not being able to keep up with the clock becomes an issue that has to be worked out, but at or below 45X where you choose to run, there are more tweaking options.

Have you considered writing a guide for mid level overclock?

Just curious UL, a guide is a lot of work! Ry

a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 6:11:00 PM

Quote:
man bruddah your spot on about my under 4.5GHz clocks, and I get tons of PM's about them.
kinda flattering really, I know some good minor tweaks...

can I 'rough draft' something to you maybe this weekend and you shoot it back to me at your convenience.?
much appreciated.


Sure man I'll be glad to help you refine it, but keep in mind, I am not a moderator anymore, so when you get it sticky worthy you'll have to get a moderator to look it over and take the responsibility of sticking it for you, but you'll have my recommendation at the time it's needed. Ry
July 7, 2012 10:19:05 AM

Hey, I'm back with more questions :D  heh

If I did want to OC a 2500k to ~4 - 4.5ghz, how much would the cooling cost?
a b à CPUs
July 7, 2012 10:35:50 AM

A decent cooler like the Hyper EVO should get the job done. It costs about£30, and you can run it in a push-pull fan setup to optimize cooling.
a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 11:40:23 AM

AbdullahG said:
A decent cooler like the Hyper EVO should get the job done. It costs about£30, and you can run it in a push-pull fan setup to optimize cooling.


Affirmative, however to the OP;

You'll have to buy the 2nd fan for the Hyper EVO, it does not come with it, and it will only improve performance by maybe 1c load temperature.

The cooler you can run your overclocked CPU the longer it will last.

For longevity I suggest the Noctua NH-D14, it already comes with 2 fans and yes it's more expensive because it's a much better cooler, you get what you pay for.

Quote:
If I did want to OC a 2500k to ~4 - 4.5ghz, how much would the cooling cost?


There are much more expensive cooling options especially if you water cooled, but for a 4.5ghz clock with a 2500K, you'll be running in a cool safe load temperature zone with the Noctua.
July 7, 2012 3:37:35 PM

4Ryan6 said:

The cooler you can run your overclocked CPU the longer it will last.


So if, say a 2500k or maybe a 3570k was overclocked to ~4.5ghz with a decent cooler, how long would it last compared to a non-overclocked CPU? Does overclocking take a significant chunk of life out of a CPU?
a c 313 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 5:25:11 PM

aayjaay said:
Does overclocking take a significant chunk of life out of a CPU?

If you go a little too wild with it or get plain unlucky, you can fry it on the spot.

Under ideal operating conditions with no fabrication defects, a CPU has practically infinite lifespan, you are going to throw it away due to being too slow to do anything or not supporting the mandatory IO standards of the day long before it fails. When overclocked under less-than-ideal conditions or to extreme degrees, the lifespan can be reduced all the way down to a few months, possibly less.

How long a CPU will survive overclocking depends on luck of the draw, the motherboard, voltage, clock frequency, core temperature, etc.
a c 168 à CPUs
a c 351 K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 6:27:02 PM

aayjaay said:
So if, say a 2500k or maybe a 3570k was overclocked to ~4.5ghz with a decent cooler, how long would it last compared to a non-overclocked CPU? Does overclocking take a significant chunk of life out of a CPU?


No one can give you a solid longevity answer regarding newly marketed CPUs, neither SBKs or IBKs have been on the market long enough to be failing except for sheer abusive overclocking, and those CPUs would have been classed as sacrificial anyway, I'm referring to extreme LN2 maximum overclocking.

The boxed CPUs are warranted for 3 years, it's a ways to go to even be out of warranty!

I don't know of any 2500K failures from someone clocking to 4500mhz, even disabling all of Intels features, so if your goal would be the 4500mhz range, I would venture to say it will last you until your next upgrade.

This time next year if technology continues it's path the 2500K and the 3570K will be old news.
July 7, 2012 7:33:52 PM

4Ryan6 said:

This time next year if technology continues it's path the 2500K and the 3570K will be old news.


What do you mean? If you're talking about Haswell, I made a thread about it a few days ago. The general vibe was that the 2500k/3570k would still be running games well for many years to come.
July 7, 2012 7:42:34 PM

Quote:
relax, he was making a point.
yes, general vibe is correct.


Yah, I know. I just misunderstood 'old news' :p