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UPS question

Last response: in Components
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July 7, 2012 10:29:48 PM

I am about to put together my system:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.98 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($92.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.95 @ B&H)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 550D ATX Mid Tower Case ($137.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Keyboard: Microsoft CSD-00001 Wireless Ergonomic Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Adorama)
Total: $1628.78
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Now I need a UPS. I put everything up in http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp, and I should be okay with about 488W from the computer, plus roughly 200W for the monitor, wireless router and cable box. Using an 85% efficiency estimate that's about 770W that I would need from the UPS, right? So I figure I'll err on the safe side and get anything above 800W. Now, looking at the Cyberpower enthusiast units (I don't need more than about 5 minutes on battery - just enough for a safe shutdown), there seem to be two types of UPS: AVR, or PFC. My understanding is that for a power supply with Active PFC I would need a PFC UPS. Is this correct? Or can I use an AVR UPS as well?

More about : ups question

a c 1180 ) Power supply
July 7, 2012 11:11:15 PM

The Seasonic SS-750KM seems to be stable when using a simulated sine wave UPS according to X-bit labs test review of that unit.

Simulated sine wave UPS' are cheaper and more widely available than pure sine wave UPS'.

It's preferable that the UPS has AVR.

Does your monitor really draw 200 Watts? On the back of the monitor there should be electrical specifications that say what the maximum or typical power draw is.
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July 7, 2012 11:14:57 PM

Thanks!

So I think the PFC units have AVR, but the AVR units don't have PFC. My question is whether I can use a unit with AVR only and the Active PFC Seasonic X-750.

About the monitor, I'm being conservative. It's 135 max for the monitor (per the manual), and the AC adapter for the cable boz reads 30W, I have nothing for the wireless router but I'm guessing 30W, and rounding all up.
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a c 1180 ) Power supply
July 8, 2012 4:04:54 AM

As I said in my previous post the Seasonic SS-750KM is capable of running properly on a simulated sine wave UPS.

You do not need to purchase a pure sine wave UPS. The only time you need to purchase a pure sine wave UPS is if the power supply unit that you are using has a problem running on a UPS that produces a simulated sine wave when operating on battery power.
Quote:
... AVR units don't have PFC. ...
What does AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulation) have to do with PFC (Power Factor Correction)? They're both mutually exclusive.

A good UPS should always have AVR to limit voltage fluctuations.
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July 8, 2012 4:37:28 AM

megmeg said:
I am about to put together my system:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.98 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($92.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.95 @ B&H)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 550D ATX Mid Tower Case ($137.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Keyboard: Microsoft CSD-00001 Wireless Ergonomic Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Adorama)
Total: $1628.78
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Now I need a UPS. I put everything up in http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp, and I should be okay with about 488W from the computer, plus roughly 200W for the monitor, wireless router and cable box. Using an 85% efficiency estimate that's about 770W that I would need from the UPS, right? So I figure I'll err on the safe side and get anything above 800W. Now, looking at the Cyberpower enthusiast units (I don't need more than about 5 minutes on battery - just enough for a safe shutdown), there seem to be two types of UPS: AVR, or PFC. My understanding is that for a power supply with Active PFC I would need a PFC UPS. Is this correct? Or can I use an AVR UPS as well?

Any legitimate UPS should have AVR and PFC, they're just technologies that have been around for a while. As for good UPSes Tripp Lite makes excellent units. For supported power I myself would probably get a kilowatt unit because I'd most likely end up needing that much power at some point if I added in another graphics card or a good sound system. If you won't ever use above your given power estimate then an 800W unit should do you fine.
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