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Help to configure Internet through LAN etc

Last response: in Networking
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April 6, 2011 8:12:28 AM

Hi guys

This is what I have

2 x Desktop PC's, both with Windows 7

2 x working LAN Cables

1 x wireless Router

1 x USB Cell C Modem

This is what I want:-

Connect both PC's to one network through the Router

Internet working on both PC's

Internet working through the router as well (wireless for laptops etc in the house)

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This is what is happening:-

PC's connected to the same workgroup through the router. Can play LAN games and copy and share files etc.

Internet only on the PC that has the USB Modem connected. Other PC shows work group but no internet on that screen.

I have shared everything on the working PC but yet the other one doesnt connect.

Also no idea how to activate the internet on the wireless router.


Any step by step suggestions?

How do I delete a workgroup on Windows?

Regards

More about : configure internet lan

April 6, 2011 10:48:34 PM

Hmm well, the problem is your router needs internet plugged in to it the WAN port connection, before it will share internet with anyone. So if your modem is only USB
I would recommend getting a modem with an Ethernet port, so you can be with that 99.999% of the people, that can plug there modem right in to the WAN port of the router.

If you cant get a modem with USB then you will need a computer to sharing the internet to the router. The problem is, this computer will need to be on anytime you want internet, it will also be out side you local network on the WAN port of you router. So no other computer in your local network can see it, and that computer can't see the other computer. I recommend the worst computer you have. Like an old laptop (low power, great for an always on computer) to be you internet server. You plug that USB modem in to that, get that working (make sure if has internet.) Then you plug that computer in the WAN port on your router.

I am going to use windows internet connection sharing to share you internet with the router, in my experience internet connection sharing only works half the time. So this might not even work. And may cause problems down the road.

To enable internet sharing (windows 7)
Open network and sharing center click on change adapter setting) Right click on your usb modem, go to properties, then sharing, check "Allow other network user to connect through the computer internet connection. And select the network card you what to share to. (the one the is connected to the router's wan port.
It should be sharing internet now.
Unplug your router give it a few seconds and plug it back in,
That should be it, If it works right, all device connected to that router will have internet.
Related resources
a b X LAN
April 7, 2011 3:16:23 AM

While ICS will work, I have several problems w/ it.

If you connect the PC to the router’s WAN port as suggested, the PC and the other users are on different subnets. In fact, the PC is confronted by the router’s firewall, while all the other users are behind it. Also, all those other users are double NAT’d, which may or may not be a problem (depends on how you plan to use the Internet connection).

The other option is to connect your PC to one of the router’s LAN ports (iow, not use the WAN port at all). You’ll want to disable the router’s DHCP server, and give it an IP address in the same subnet as ICS (192.168.0.x). Perhaps 192.168.0.99 would be a good choice since ICS’s DHCP server allocates IPs starting from 192.168.0.2 and up. At least this places everyone behind the router and using the same subnet, although the double NAT remains. And as w/ the prior configuration, routing is relegated to ICS, which is much more limited than your router (e.g., no port forwarding).

As a rule, I only like ICS “in a pinch”, when I need something quick and dirty for a rare occasion. So while either of these two configurations will definitely work, you take some hits in terms of performance and functionality. That’s why I propose a third alternative.

Instead of using ICS, bridge the wired and 3G connections and unbind TCP/IP from that bridge. Then patch the wired connection to the WAN port of your router. This will allow the WAN port of the router to receive the public IP rather than your PC. Now everyone behind the router has Internet access, uses the router’s subnet, and has access to all the router’s features (e.g., port forwarding).

The only remaining issue is that the bridged PC now has no connectivity for itself (it was sacrificed for the sake of the router). But that’s easily corrected. Just install another wired/wireless network adapter (you may have one already installed for all I know) and connect it to the router like everyone else. Voila, everyone is now behind the router.

<-- internet -->[3g modem]<-- usb -->(usb)[pc w/ usb+wire bridged](lan)<-- wire -->(wan)[router]

To bridge the connections, go to Network Connections (at any command prompt, type “ncpa.cpl” (no quotes) and hit enter), select both network connections, right click, and select Bridge Connections.

To unbind TCP/IP from that bridged connection, right click the bridge, select Properties, and untick the TCP/IP protocol option(s). It will be described slightly differently depending on OS version. I have XP and it reads “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)”, for Win7 you’ll see options for TCP/IPv4 and TCP/IPv6 (untick both).

And btw, if you’re willing to spend the money, then obviously Emerald’s suggestion is the best. But if you want something “on the cheap”, these three configurations basically compromise your options.

April 7, 2011 4:28:18 AM

eibgrad said:


The other option is to connect your PC to one of the router’s LAN ports (iow, not use the WAN port at all). You’ll want to disable the router’s DHCP server, and give it an IP address in the same subnet as ICS (192.168.0.x). Perhaps 192.168.0.99 would be a good choice since ICS’s DHCP server allocates IPs starting from 192.168.0.2 and up. At least this places everyone behind the router and using the same subnet, although the double NAT remains. And as w/ the prior configuration, routing is relegated to ICS, which is much more limited than your router (e.g., no port forwarding).


Another problem is you will need to keep that computer on, anytime you want any network connectivity, Local or Internet, because that computer is now you DHCP server.

I think I missed something where is the double NAT in this setup?
a b X LAN
April 7, 2011 5:26:54 AM

Catsrules said:
Another problem is you will need to keep that computer on, anytime you want any network connectivity, Local or Internet, because that computer is now you DHCP server.

I think I missed something where is the double NAT in this setup?


If he's using the PC for the 3G access, any configuration short of using a 3G router is going to leave the PC running. That's simply unavoidable.

The double NAT occurs when using ICS in conjunction w/ the router over its WAN port (as you suggested, or else I misunderstood you). I'm suggesting if the OP wants to use ICS he avoid the double NAT by connecting over the router's LAN port. Or better yet, not use ICS at all and use the PC as a simple bridge between the 3G and the router's WAN. Either of these last two options avoids the double NAT.
April 7, 2011 5:51:55 AM

eibgrad said:
If he's using the PC for the 3G access, any configuration short of using a 3G router is going to leave the PC running. That's simply unavoidable.

The double NAT occurs when using ICS in conjunction w/ the router over its WAN port (as you suggested, or else I misunderstood you). I'm suggesting if the OP wants to use ICS he avoid the double NAT by connecting over the router's LAN port. Or better yet, not use ICS at all and use the PC as a simple bridge between the 3G and the router's WAN. Either of these last two options avoids the double NAT.


No it was me that missedunderstood, thought you where saying connecting over the LAN ports would cause a double NAT..
Ok we are all on the same page now :) .
!