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Using multiple LAN ports for transferring 1 item between 2 PCs

Last response: in Networking
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April 6, 2011 11:48:47 AM

Hello,
Is it possible to transfer an image (that is broken into parts for transfer) using 4 LAN ports at source end and 2 LAN ports at recieving end.The goal is to minimise the transfer time of the image as we have 4 LAN ports ont he source machine and 2 LAN ports at the destination
April 6, 2011 10:03:49 PM

Just out of curiosity, how big is the image?

If you network cards support it, you can setup teaming.

But I don't think you will see a increase in speeds at all. I am guessing you are using gigabit network cards? (If your not, stop messing around and get one) Gigabit is faster then most hard drives out there. It can go up to 125 MBps, and most hard drives I have used will only go 70-80MBps on a good day (different for every drive) and if you using USB storage is can also slow it down(USB2 can only go at 60MBps).

The only way I have gotten the full 125MBps is when I made some of my RAM to act as a hard drive, on two computers and copied data between them to my ram drive.

Best solution

a b X LAN
April 7, 2011 4:33:50 PM
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In theory, you could do it. But given the hassle, you'd have to seriously consider whether it was worth the effort.

Each computer would need two network adapters (you’re only going to be able to use the maximum number of common connections, which in this case is two). And each computer would need to be multi-homed over IP (e.g., 192.168.1.x for one, 192.168.2.x for the other). Finally, you would segregate the file transfers based on IPs. And yes, obviously Gigabit (1000Mbps) switching would perform better than 10/100Mbps switching provided your drives were capable of Gigabit speeds.

One other word of caution is on order. Many cheap/inexpensive switches do not provide full capacity on their backplane. A consumer-grade, 4-port, 100Mbps switch, which you might *assume* has a 400Mbps backplane, may be considerably less, which ultimately limits the throughput of the switch as a whole. The manufacturer is cutting corners under the assumption the customer is not likely to saturate the switch. That’s why using a high-end switch or inexpensive Gigabit switch, may be necessary, even if you don’t have Gigabit network adapters.



April 14, 2011 4:16:45 AM

Best answer selected by topcoder.
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