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Video Editing Build! $2500-3000

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March 25, 2012 10:31:04 PM

Since...

-I have $1600 Best Buy store credit
-I have all the time in the world (forced to take a semester off from school)
-the reseller I planned to purchase a PC from would be making a few hundred off of me and money is an issue

I might as well build my own.

The specs of the PC I was going to get can be found over on this forum http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/338797-31-asking-geni...

Does anyone want to take a swing at this? If it is any added incentive, I REALLY am planning on building this...and will send pics of the end result to ze winner.


an i7 with a gtx 680...should I wait for Ivy Bridge? Because I know I don't want to.

Approximate Purchase Date: ASAP

Budget Range: $2500-2900

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Editing AVCHD in Premiere Pro CS5.5…I want it to be able to handle ANYTHING to do with PP

Parts Not Required: Keyboard, Mouse, Monitor (I have an old HP Pavilion vs17e 17-inch flat panel LCD from 2005…hopefully it’ll be compatible)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg, Bestbuy

Country: USA
Parts Preferences: Intel i7 (probably 3820) CPU, GTX 680 GPU

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Unsure what that is..
March 25, 2012 11:47:06 PM

Do you know if Premiere Pro favors AMD or NVIDIA? That may affect your GPU choice.

In that price range, I'd also consider Sandy Bridge E (X79).
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March 25, 2012 11:55:31 PM

It favors NVIDIA.
I'm going with an x79 mobo and a gtx680, but thats all I know for now.
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Related resources
March 26, 2012 12:45:59 AM

kevin2 said:
It favors NVIDIA.
I'm going with an x79 mobo and a gtx680, but thats all I know for now.

Well that gets the hard decisions out of the way then :) 

BTW the link you have to the build specs isn't working.

The X79 boards won't support Ivy (different socket) so you're limited to the 2011 socket CPUs (which should be more than plenty). That + GTX 680 will eat up about $1k though, so just be sure to spend wisely on the rest of the parts.

I don't see how you wouldn't be able to fit in a good SSD, HDDs, a roomy case, and a good PSU with ~$1.5K leftover
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March 26, 2012 1:29:59 AM

D'oh! Thought Ivy Bridge was 2011.

I fixed the link.
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March 26, 2012 3:13:58 AM

That build's pretty good and sounds like what you need. All I would do to change that is throw an SSD in as the OS drive.

Would you get any performance boost by RAIDing the mechanical HDDs rather than having them separately as Source/Render drive setup? I'm not a video editor, but I'm just picking your brain about things that stick out to me ;) 
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Anonymous
March 26, 2012 3:44:15 AM

i would *highly* recommend getting a 21" 1080 or larger monitor. with all the "panels" on the premiere interface, it could use as much real estate as possible. and wouldn't it be helpful to see as much of the time line as possible?

use the 17" to multitask such as tracking down source files for editing.

EDIT: with 1536 CUDA cores, 3 times as many as the 580, i wonder how much better the 680 will be . . :) 
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Anonymous
March 26, 2012 4:21:39 AM

max40watt said:
The 680 is not currently on the list of Adobe supported GPUs

http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/tech-specs.html

You might want to stick with a 570 or 580, or wait to see if it is added.

Doh!
good catch.


found a hack, here on tom's even:
Hacking CS5 For Cheaper Acceleration
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/adobe-cs5-cuda-64-b...

and it worked for my 550 ti :) 
the before and after using the gpusniffer.
http://img855.imageshack.us/img855/2681/premierehack.jp...
and after going to the nvida control panel selecting performance compatibility mode for PP, i now have the GPU to help render in the project settings.
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March 26, 2012 4:27:17 AM

+1
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March 26, 2012 4:44:39 AM

I would suggest x79 and nvidia kepler.

Adobe will support kepler in within few days.

This is what your build should look like in rough.

Intel i7 3930k
asus sabertooth x79 motherboard.
Noctua nh d-14
corsair low profile vengence 4x4 gb 1600mhz ddr3
Evga gtx 680 2gb
power pc and cooling mkii 950w 80+ silver
intel 520 120 gb sata3 ssd
wd velociraptor 600 gb 10k rpm hdd
seagate baracuda 1.5 tb 5900 rpm hdd
Cm storm trooper full tower case
Windows 7 professional 64 bit oem

i would suggest a 23" monitor with ips panel and your current display as auxalary display for root folders and another things.

That would cost another 300-400 usd for it.

I would post some links later.
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March 26, 2012 2:27:31 PM

should i have a raid array or just the setup serialkiller recommends? I'm thinking 3930k now too..
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Anonymous
March 26, 2012 2:39:49 PM

kevin2 said:
should i have a raid array or just the setup serialkiller recommends? I'm thinking 3930k now too..

the 3930k is probably the best choice.

i understand the SSD as OS/program drive and the raptor as your scratch disk, you do not want to write a lot to an SSD, but i would think about a couple of 1TB WD blacks in raid0 for data storage.
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March 26, 2012 2:50:03 PM

Quote:
Intel i7 3930k
asus sabertooth x79 motherboard.

Solid platform and similar to what we've been discussing. Motherboard is up in the air based on what the OP wants/needs.

Quote:
power pc and cooling mkii 950w 80+ silver

This is a bit much for a single GPU system that uses at most 225W. I'd go with a good Corsair/XFX/Seasonic 750W PSU. The Silencer MK II 750W is also a good PSU.

Quote:
intel 520 120 gb sata3 ssd
wd velociraptor 600 gb 10k rpm hdd
seagate baracuda 1.5 tb 5900 rpm hdd

Don't understand this. Why have an SSD and then go out and waste a bunch of money on a 10k RPM drive? They're not that fast nowadays.

Quote:
should i have a raid array or just the setup serialkiller recommends? I'm thinking 3930k now too..

Did you see my previous question about the drive setup that was in the build you linked? I was wondering if you got any benefit using a Source/Render drive setup. A RAID 0 setup will boost your speeds a little bit, but I would guess that the parallel source/render drive setup would be a little faster. If you had time, you could even try a little benchmarking to see which is faster.

Quote:
i would suggest a 23" monitor with ips panel and your current display as auxalary display for root folders and another things.

At some point this would be a good investment.

*DISCLAIMER*
I love Dell's business-level displays (Professional and Ultrasharp). It's hard for me to recommend another brand (in the same price range) since all-around they offer a lot of great features.

For an IPS display I'd go with the Dell U2312 (23"). I use the P2411 (last year's 24" Pro model) and it's fantastic. I can't even imagine how much better the IPS panel looks over TN, and it get great reviews all around from designers to gamers.
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March 26, 2012 2:50:27 PM

or

500g hdd..or SSD (if its honestly worth it...ill be just using PP. Will it just..open faster?)

1TB/1TB Raid 0

1 TB/1 TB Raid 0

Now if I could only figure out how to do this raid nonsense...I wouldn't need a controller its on the mobo, yes?
me=newb, by the way.
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March 26, 2012 2:58:11 PM

"Did you see my previous question about the drive setup that was in the build you linked? I was wondering if you got any benefit using a Source/Render drive setup. "
According to ADK, yes.
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March 26, 2012 3:10:45 PM

kevin2 said:
Whats the difference b/t Sabertooth and http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Asus+-+P9X79+Desktop+Mother...


According to newegg, you get SATA 6 Gbps and USB 3.0 on the Sabertooth but not on the P9X79 (which doesn't make much sense - USB 3.0 and SATA III is pretty much commonplace nowadays).

Quote:
500g hdd..or SSD (if its honestly worth it...ill be just using PP. Will it just..open faster?)

1TB/1TB Raid 0

1 TB/1 TB Raid 0

Now if I could only figure out how to do this raid nonsense...I wouldn't need a controller its on the mobo, yes?
me=newb, by the way.

Your SSD will be much faster than a regular drive (we're talking cold boot in under 45 seconds for a mediocre drive).
How big is PP? You could probably get away with a 64GB drive since you'll use ~25GB for W7 64bit, leaving about 25GB free for drivers, PP and probably some plugins associated with PP.

Both boards you're looking at have a RAID controller built in. Not sure what kind and how many drives they will support (depends on the board) but you should be able to RAID 4 drives (2+2). You access all that stuff in the BIOS. If you ever hit snags, we have a RAID forum in the Storage section as well.

Quote:
"Did you see my previous question about the drive setup that was in the build you linked? I was wondering if you got any benefit using a Source/Render drive setup. "
According to ADK, yes.

Ok, then that's something you'll want to pursue. If you can afford it, the 4x1TB drives in RAID 0 would be a good option. HDD prices kinda suck now...
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March 26, 2012 3:16:22 PM

I'm about at budget, so I'm going to have to just do 3 hard drives..or 2 and an ssd..for now if I want the 3930k/gtx680. Especially if I want a new monitor.
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March 26, 2012 3:20:01 PM

I forget how big PP is, and I don't have it on my laptop. The website says "•10GB of available hard-disk space for installation; additional free space required during installation "
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March 26, 2012 3:21:01 PM

2 HDDs are probably good enough (3 won't really do anything for you since you'll have a dangling single drive).

The monitor can also be a future upgrade, since it's just an add-on.
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March 26, 2012 3:24:07 PM

so 2hdd's total? Not having a third tiny one for os/programs?ssd is way too expensive for me.
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Anonymous
March 26, 2012 3:30:25 PM

to the OP: (kevin2)
are you video editing "professionally" or a hobby?

what i am getting at is if you find yourself working on a project for 8-10 hours at a time then getting a fast as possible hard drive for a scratch disk would save time when editing and rendering.
you really do NOT want that to be an SSD; ssd life expectancy is measured in disk writes, the less you write to it and read only, the longer chronologically it lasts (if anyone believes that is incorrect please say so)

so what i am wondering about is a set up with:
SSD for programs/OS you will be grateful for the speed
a SCRATCH disk
source and finished media files (a raid0 set up of 2TB or better)

if this is nonsensical . .sorry.

disclaimer- i am NOT a video editor, i have "fooled" around with premiere pro some but only have a beginner's knowledge of some of its requirements. btw, did you see the cuda hack i posted?
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March 26, 2012 3:44:33 PM

Hello op

Are you a professional or is it your hobby.
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March 26, 2012 3:56:59 PM

hobby that I'd like to turn into a profession/going to school for.
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March 26, 2012 3:59:03 PM

Yes, I saw the CUDA hack. Thanks for that.
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March 26, 2012 4:40:47 PM

kevin2 said:
so 2hdd's total? Not having a third tiny one for os/programs?ssd is way too expensive for me.


I meant 2 drives for the source/render setup like this:

64GB SSD - OS + PP
1TB (or other size) - Source
1TB (same drive) - Render

Quote:
so what i am wondering about is a set up with:
SSD for programs/OS you will be grateful for the speed
a SCRATCH disk
source and finished media files (a raid0 set up of 2TB or better)

This makes sense, though I don't know what you mean by "scratch" disk - never used editing programs whatsoever, so I'm in the dark a little.
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March 26, 2012 5:41:36 PM

That's what I'm doing..the two drive setup for the source/render because my budget is constrained..even more so since I just paid $637 for the $600 3930k at best buy. (had to use store credit.)
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March 26, 2012 5:57:26 PM

i didnt go with raid because any raid setup always has a major disadvantage

i understand that 10k hdd are not that fast but they are fast enough to be used.

i would suggest 1 ssd for os and programs mainly 120gb 1 ssd for your work mainly 120 - 240 gb and one 1.5 tb cheap hdd for other data which is not in use or dont need massive bandwidth.

i would recommend to buy a new monitor for your primary monitor and keep the current one as auxalary. i would guess that it would be of 600 x 800

this is my suggested build

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx...

with monitor its $2900

i could reduce the prices if you want in motherboard , ssd and monitor. if you want to keep the old monitor as your primary then a gtx 460 is all you need and you can play metro 2033 and bf3 at ultra settings but that will be shame at that res and size :pfff: 

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March 26, 2012 6:39:34 PM

Looks like there is lots of good advice on here already, so I will just throw in my 2 cents where I find potential issues.
1) If doing 2 HDDs then get large ones in RAID 1, but a 3 drive setup would be better. I have found much better performance using separate drives for OS, rendering/documents (ie music and small documents) drive, and a content/source footage drive than with a singular RAID1 (RAID0 may be faster than single drives, but a little too close to playing with fire when doing real work where you don't want to loose anything). Mechanical HDDs only really choke when you are both reading and writing to them at the same time, if you have one you are reading from, and another that you are writing to then there should not be much of a performance hit... but you still will not be able to really utilize an i7 until you are running RAID5/10 or using SSDs. I am running ~60-80% load when rendering HD footage on my i7 2600 with 3 single purpose drives, and until I have my SSD to render to and a RAID1 to get source from there is simply no way around this bottleneck, and the bottleneck will be even more pronounced on a 6 core SB-E chip, so seriously consider SSDs or multiple RAID arrays, there simply is no option here.

2) Ram matters for space, not speed in video editing (but 1600 never hurt anybody ;)  ). 16GB should be considered a minimum (especially on a SB-E board, you've got the slots and Ram is cheap, so fill it up!), 32GB can be adequate (depending on project size), and the option to go 64GB with 8GB sticks is a nice safe thing to have for future expansion if ram prices dive again, or you find you need even more space.

3) the 680 is not supported, and will likely never be supported by CS5.5 I am running a GTX570 and it has truly impressive CUDA power and is more than overkill for my personal editing needs (I can throw ~4-6 CUDA enabled effects on a video before it begins to choke, and I have not found a reason to need more than 2 at a time yet), and it is the cheapest supported card that I am aware of. You can hack the software to support other cards, but generally with stability issues, and may not be any faster than running off the CPU in the first place, so I would not suggest it. CUDA only accelerates specific things, the most useful of which is color correction (and it is AWESOME! especially if you have ever had to correct footage shot at a wedding reception in a dark/yellow room with yellow lights). Other than that it supports green screening pretty well, as well as some transitions which most people will never use. If you do not need the things that CUDA supports then get a basic/cheap GPU for multiple display support (as NO other processing goes through the GPU) and throw your money as your HDDs/SSDs and CPU power.
The 680 is based off of the 560 which is not a production card. There will be a 580 based card coming out, but I fear it will be a Quadro only card, and thus out of the reach of mainstream users like ourselves (but no doubt it will be AMAZING). The 680 does have a whole slew of CUDA cores, but they are not the same as the ones on the 500 series, so things may simply not work, not work as expected, or simply cause a slew of issues, and we already know from benchmarks that those CUDA cores are not translating into compute performance like we thought they would. If time is on your side then wait for Adobe to say something about it. They may change CS5 to support the 680, or they may add support to CS6 which I think will be out before too long (no idea on a rough release date though, but I recently saw an ad about photoshop CS6, so things are likely coming soon).

4) SSDs are like gold for media work of any kind. This is one of those rare times where you would want to get a HDD for your system drive, and then a 'big enough' SSD to use as a project drive. It has more than enough iops to use as both the content and render drive at the same time, and I would highly suggest getting one as you will be hard pressed to push the rest of your hardware without one. Just a thought, but with the rapid changes being made to SSDs in firmware and quality i would suggest keeping a copy of all of your information on a HDD or HDD RAID, and then getting a cheap SSD to pound to death as a project drive. Yes, you may kill it prematurely (still likely 2-3 years), but with the way things are changing there will be much faster, much more stable, and (most importantly) much LARGER drives available at a reasonable price at that point at that time (or at least more reasonable than today's standard). Just if you get a cheap but large drive (like a Chronos) have a workflow that allows for it to fail without too much pain (like loosing all of your work)... but then again, you should plan for drive failure even if you get the much nicer Intel drives because drive failure is simply an annoying part of life.

5) Get as many cores/threads as you can. Keep in mind this is the one area that AMD is still cost competitive in. I would still lean towards the Intel side of things, but if you found a good deal on a duel CPU AMD setup in the same price range then it would be good to jump on. But I think you are on the right track thinking of going with the 6 core SB-E setups

6) SB-E is LGA2011, SB and IB are LGA1155, there will be an IB-E at some point (likely a year or so from now), but it will also (like every previous high end setup) likely have it's own socket that does not yet exist. IB quad cores should be on par with SB-E, but SB-E has the 6core chips and that is the route to take if doing heavy editing.

7) The joy of RAID is redundancy, RAID 0 is fast, but much more likely to have issues than RAID 1/5/10 as there is 0 redundancy (thus RAID0). Raid1 is good on read speeds, but your writes will suck making it good for a source or storage drive, but bad as a scratch disc or rendering drive. RAID 5 is solid on read and write, but needs 4+ drives to be particularly fast, and there is a bit of a CPU hit if you are not on a true hardware RAID controller. RAID 10 is also fast, and does not have as heavy of a CPU hit with software RAID, but requires exactly 4 identical drives and can suffer from some of the issues of RAID0 where it concerns errors (but unlike RAID0 you can recover from it), and it also only gives you 50% of the actual space (compared to RAID5 which is n-1).

8) Serial Killer is obviously a gamer, but it is still not a bad build. Swap the 680 for a 580, or better yet a Quadro card with 2-4GB of ram. Noctua coolers are neat, and quiet, but entirely unnecessary and do not cool significantly more than a $35 Hyper 212 Evo (note I am not saying not to get one, just get better storage or GPU first). Do 8x4GB of ram instead of 4x4GB. Sabertooth is a great board, but you can go cheaper with no performance hit. RAID or more SSD space is a must. Win7Pro is required when going above 16GB of Ram. And HP monitors are almost as good as the Dell ones, but cost a bit less for small sacrifices in feature sets (like USB hubs on the screen, and less connector options), either way, you have money in the budget and should have at least one large screen, and having 2-3 of them would be nice.

Best of luck!
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March 26, 2012 6:58:13 PM

Caedenv is right but he just said what we were saying

@caedenv i am a hard core gamer and also i do vedio edition and compositing as well as 3d maya with heavy renders.

I would to had pointed to quadro but looking at your budget and and uses it was the only choise to use gaming card.

I would suggest to get gtx 680 as adobe will update its software to recognise kepler but if not then it will be supported fir cs6 no release date announced yet.

In that case i would suggest evga gtx 580 classified 3gb model.

Get the ips display for graphic designing it will be awesome and you will never turn back to tn screens

you can decrease the mobo to asrock x79 extreme 4 3- way sli
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March 26, 2012 7:59:54 PM

Suggested Build (oh! if only I ad money lol, instead I'll spend yours for ya ;)  )

Mobo: $260 (wait for a sale if you are in no rush, prices may drop a little after the IB release next month), 8 ram slots, ASUS quality, SB-E support... that's about all you really need
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: $600 6 cores/12 threads, OCable, and lets not forget awesome :) 
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU Cooler: $30 (jump on it now as it is on sale) CM Hyper N 520
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Ram: $190 G.Skill 32GB 1600 (these do not tend to go on sale, but the 4x4GB kits do, so keep an eye out. Most ram is largely similar regardless of brand, but I still like G.Skill and Corsair best for customer service in the event of a problem)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD: $244 mushkin 240GB. I'm going to go the unconventional route and use this as your project and render drive. It should be large enough for most projects, and fast enough iops to use as both content and render drive. While being a cheaper brand, I have read reviews that it keeps up with the performance drives, and is as stable as the Intel drives. Remember to run it in AHCI or RAID mode, there are other optimizations if you choose to run SSD as an OS drive, and you have room in the budget to get 2 of these in RAID if you want, or the larger 480GB brother for $530 when it is in stock.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDDs: $200, $100ea, Seagate 5900rpm 1.5TB drives in RAID1. For use as OS/program/storage drive, these are very quiet, not much slower than 7200rpm drives, and relatively cheap. While I am not a fan boy of many things I absolutely love Seagate drives, they are both cheap and reliable, and unlike some other brands cheap drives you can RAID them :) . Being used as OS/Program drives you do not need fast access times, just leave the heavy lifting to the SSD, and use these as quiet redundant storage.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: $300, MSI GTX570 Twin Frozr III. They are quiet, get great reviews, and should have the CUDA support you need for CS5.5. Personally I opted for a much cheaper Sparkle brand card and am putting a truly silent aftermarket cooler on it, but I am assuming that as a non hardware geek that a heatsink/fan replacement on the GPU would likely give you a heart attack (I know it nearly did the first time I did one lol). Again, we are on the verge of a price war, so expect these to drop in price dramatically over the next few months.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Sound Card: $25 X-Fi MB2. Your onboard audio is more than quality enough, and just lacks the software to make it something 'special'. This is software that will do that for you. I have it on my computer and it works like a dream. The order process is a bit wonkey, but it worked in the end (they make you buy a CD through Amazon... but it is a digital download. Took nearly 8 hours before I got the download link e-mailed to me, and then the server feels like it is on dial-up... but in the end it was worth it). Remember the real trick to quality audio is going optical out to a quality receiver, and then using the receiver to control your speakers and headphones, add-on sounds cards are far too over rated.
http://us.store.creative.com/Sound-Blaster-XFi-MB2-Down...

Blue Ray burner: $80 LG burner, or whatever you find on sale. It's in the budget, and will allow for blue ray export which is kinda handy when running high end video. If not interested in blue-ray then just go with a cheap $20 DVD burner. Burners die when you use them consistently, so just get cheap ones and plan on replacing them every year or so.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Power Supply: $70 PC Power and Cooling silencer mk3 600W. While underwhelming specs this is more than enough power for the rig I am posting, and these are super reliable for a great price, and now they are finally modular which is a plus. This will be plenty of power for a single 580, and most Quadro cards. As SLi is not (yet) supported by most software for CUDA I do not suggest having multiple GPUs until your next build when things may have changed so there is no need for a monster PSU. Jump on it now while it is on sale.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total Price: $2000, and much less if you find parts on sale
-Note I did not include a case, as my taste in cases tends to be cheap compared to most people's sensibilities (though I do like some of those Corsair cases... especially the white ones :)  ). I suggest not going overboard on the case, and getting something conservative, but with space to grow, and space for plenty of low RPM 120+mm fans.
-Also, I suggest either getting an HP or Dell IPS or sIPS monitor, but that is perhaps something to purchase after you put the build together and know that we have not overlooked anything. Do not get a TN screen for production work as they cannot be color correct no matter what you do. This is a mistake I am still kicking myself for. 1920x1200 should be seen as a minimum starting resolution.

Obviously, there is plenty of space in this budget for a GTX580, larger SSD, or larger HDDs (or perhaps a huge external HDD for backups...), but I think this rig will get the job done nicely as-is, and is a good starting point to build from.

Best of luck!
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March 26, 2012 8:14:30 PM

serialkiller said:
Caedenv is right but he just said what we were saying

@caedenv i am a hard core gamer and also i do vedio edition and compositing as well as 3d maya with heavy renders.

I would to had pointed to quadro but looking at your budget and and uses it was the only choise to use gaming card.

I would suggest to get gtx 680 as adobe will update its software to recognise kepler but if not then it will be supported fir cs6 no release date announced yet.

In that case i would suggest evga gtx 580 classified 3gb model.

Get the ips display for graphic designing it will be awesome and you will never turn back to tn screens

you can decrease the mobo to asrock x79 extreme 4 3- way sli

Sorry, didn't mean any disrespect by that, it is just that the brands you chose seemed a little overpriced and game-centric to me. Combined with your avatar I just jumped to conclusions... but then again my avatar would make one think I believe in haruhism... which may or may not be true :D 
Adobe is terrible as updating old software for new hardware, so I highly doubt they will support the 680 for CS5.5 (but I could be wrong), and I think that nVidia is moving to make a clearer line between their production cards and their game cards this time around. On top of that you have the limited uses of CUDA rendering, so it is hard to imagine a use-case (at least in Premiere) where anything more than the GTX580 would make much of a difference. Though after effects is likely a whole different story.
And yes, TN screens are crap. When I finally let my 2 old Mitsubishi CRT monitors go (they were getting blurry and had to be replaced because I was getting blood-shot eyes all the time) I opted to go for a single large 27" TN screen thinking it would be fine. At the time the IPS monitors were in the $3000 range which was WAY out of my league, and they suffered from major ghosting issues which is a problem for the occasional gaming I do, and while I really had no choice at the time, I am really itching for some quality visuals now, but as I already have a TN screen the wife will not let me get a new one (makes one think it is time for the basement to flood 'unexpectedly' while my monitor is on the floor... hmmm). But if I were to do things now when you can get large IPS screens for ~$1000 it is a no-brainer decision: Get the IPS!

I know the 3GB GTX580 would be good for 3D work and after effects, but would it really help much for Premiere? As previously mentioned I have had no problems at all with my ~1GB 570.
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March 26, 2012 8:43:06 PM

caedenv, would you put..er..someone else's money where your mouth is? Because I am about to order most of that stuff you just mentioned. I am a newb (LOL auto correct said 'newt') and overwhelmed, and when I get overwhelmed I jump into things.
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March 26, 2012 8:47:47 PM

Im depositing my money and then doing the newegg.Hopefully you are right because I will name it after you.no homo.
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March 26, 2012 10:53:03 PM

is the CM Hyper N 520 2011 compatible? I will be back tomorrow to pull the trigger on this.
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March 26, 2012 11:54:57 PM

Wait for one to finalize the build for you or bofh of us.

The cm hyper evo is the optimal choice but the above cooler is also great.

The difference in build is my build components are a bit overpriced eg. motherboard , ssd and and gpu too but they are for your quality.

The candev build is more like a cheaper but of less quality espesially the ssd and he suggested a hdd and i suggested ssd.

Dont pull the triger now wait for confermation as you could get a better results if you wait for a while.
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March 27, 2012 3:42:19 AM

kevin2 said:
is the CM Hyper N 520 2011 compatible? I will be back tomorrow to pull the trigger on this.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Sorry, it is not compatible, the link above is the retention clip needed in order to make it 2011 compatible. The ones available at my local microcenter have the new bracket bundled with it, so it was a bad assumption on my part. With the added $5 for the clip (lol, one expensive clip) it would be a toss-up between it and the 212 Evo which does have the proper clip.

To Serialkiller's point, you do not want to jump too quickly. I have not done a 2011 build myself yet and am basing my opinions on the reviews I have read. For my own editing rig I decided to go with a LGA 1155 i7 2600, partly because SB-E was not available yet, but I would still likely go that route that way today because the i7 2600 more than meets my needs (videos for weddings, soccer camps, worship backgrounds at church, promotional videos, and the occasional AMV when I get particularly bored and inspired).

I have purchased several cheap Seagate HDDs (10 I think) over the past ~12 years, with only one failure which Fry's easily replaced for me. I am currently running a nearly 5 year old 1TB seagate drive in my system and use it every single day for documents with no problems (granted I have it backed up, as a drive that old is a timebomb waiting to go off). My newest one is a 500GB drive which is my system drive which I purchased last spring. They are cheap, cool, quiet, and simply work. Are there faster drives? Absolutely! But when in RAID and being used for programs and documents do you need that kind of speed when the money can be spent on other things will have a greater effect on your project rendering? And with everything else being so quiet in this rig you really don't want the whine of a 7200 or 10K rpm drive. Silence is golden for audio and video editing.
Read some reviews on those Mushkin drives, they seem to get great reviews, even when paired off against much more expensive drives. And this is 'new' technology that is droping in price almost weekly. so you don't want to sink money into something that is constantly falling in price. Jump on what is affordable and in the price range, and meets your computing needs. If it breaks you will have to RMA it. If it is out of RMA you could likely buy a 2nd one that is much larger and faster a year or two down the road and still come up cheaper with the cost of both drives compared to some of the high end products on the market. And I freely admited that this is a part that could potentially cause issues. Use it for projects, but do not trust it for long term storage. If it dies you can still render on the RAID1 until you get your RMA or replacement, so you won't be up a creek.
I don't think anyone here is going to complain about the quality of ASUS, or PC Power and Cooling (though they are under new management these days, but I have not heard of any QC issues with the change over), or Corsair/Gskill, or the MSI Twin Frasor (which truly is a 'holy cow' in some circles). These are all tried and known parts that should get the job done, and for a fair price.
I went much cheaper on my build with very few regrets (bad stick of Corsair Ram, which was a pain, but they replaced it promptly... still first stick of bad ram in 14 years, which is nothing short of a miracle. Also annoyed that I did not get a cheaper, but better quality MSI p67 mobo for my system as it turns out that quicksink sucks for file size/quality, which makes it useless, and SSD prices are falling quickly enough were I do not need SSD caching after all. I like my z68 extreme3 gen3, but it just ended up having more hype than useful features for my uses.)

Also to Serial's point I like to build things to spec, and buy parts that meet my needs at a low price, but without going so cheap as to being in fear that there would be a major QC problem. Serial's build is better quality stuff, but the question in my mind centers around the idea that if I wanted something expensive with a warranty behind it I could get a high end Dell, or HP, or even a Mac like most of my friends have. To me the joy of building your own rig is that you get far better performance, with far better quality, that fits your own specific needs, with a much lower price tag than the pre-built boxes. But that is just me.

Personally, I would have a hard time dropping $2-3000 on a system which will likely be replaced in 3-5 years, but a lot of that is because I only do video work part-time, have another full time job refurbishing and selling computers for low income families and students, and own a "good old house" that has "good old house" maintenance issues to pay for (but I love old homes for their character), and I have a baby who spends a lot of my money on fighting ear infections, and a wife who decided to go to a private school for her masters degree that I get to pay for. The point is that it is a matter of priorities and lifestyle. My build will work (and work well I think) with the budget given (except for that retention clip, good catch that), and if you hired me to build it for you I would stand behind the product (granted I do not do long distance builds for people, but if you live in the Cincinnati area feel free to PM me and I'll be glad to chat with you some time over lunch). But on the other hand, this is the Internet. We give advice on this website. There are no magical guarantees, and like anything in life you have to do your own due diligence and make your own decisions. Do you NEED a $2500 rig? I don't know, maybe for what you do you need a bigger budget, or (more likely) maybe you could get along just fine with a much cheaper system, but you did not give us much detail on the matter. That end of things if for you to decide.

If you are going to throw that kind of money at a system and have (as you said) "All the time in the world" to build it I would at least take my time in shopping the parts I want, doing good research, and pick up parts on sales when possible unless there is a particular project that requires the parts immediately (for me it was an HD project last October with my new HD camera... it did not like my old Core2Duo with 4GB of ram very well lol imagine attempting to do video editing at 3-5fps... and sync it to a soundtrack. And even after trying a friend's Core2Quad it wasn't exactly fast enough to work with, so I got parts I knew would get the job done).
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March 27, 2012 5:41:53 AM

CaedenV said:

3) the 680 is not supported, and will likely never be supported by CS5.5 I am running a GTX570 and it has truly impressive CUDA power and is more than overkill for my personal editing needs (I can throw ~4-6 CUDA enabled effects on a video before it begins to choke, and I have not found a reason to need more than 2 at a time yet), and it is the cheapest supported card that I am aware of. You can hack the software to support other cards, but generally with stability issues, and may not be any faster than running off the CPU in the first place, so I would not suggest it. CUDA only accelerates specific things, the most useful of which is color correction (and it is AWESOME! especially if you have ever had to correct footage shot at a wedding reception in a dark/yellow room with yellow lights). Other than that it supports green screening pretty well, as well as some transitions which most people will never use. If you do not need the things that CUDA supports then get a basic/cheap GPU for multiple display support (as NO other processing goes through the GPU) and throw your money as your HDDs/SSDs and CPU power.
The 680 is based off of the 560 which is not a production card. There will be a 580 based card coming out, but I fear it will be a Quadro only card, and thus out of the reach of mainstream users like ourselves (but no doubt it will be AMAZING). The 680 does have a whole slew of CUDA cores, but they are not the same as the ones on the 500 series, so things may simply not work, not work as expected, or simply cause a slew of issues, and we already know from benchmarks that those CUDA cores are not translating into compute performance like we thought they would. If time is on your side then wait for Adobe to say something about it. They may change CS5 to support the 680, or they may add support to CS6 which I think will be out before too long (no idea on a rough release date though, but I recently saw an ad about photoshop CS6, so things are likely coming soon).


i am sorry but i just can't bit my tongue any more.

that is all completely WRONG!

to say that adobe will NEVER support a particular card is ludicrous; cuda cores are cuda cores; there is not any difference in them since nvidia first produced them. the refereed to "hack" is nothing more than allowing the mercury playback engine to use them; adobe just has NOT had the time to test EACH card to qualifications and unless they have a partnership with nvidia there is no motivation for them to so. ie a developer in partnership with microsoft would have have their driver for each product pass all of microsoft's testing to get their drivers qualified even though there is No difference in component A to B. adobe has no need to; their customers will buy their products regardless of "official" cuda support. ubt you don't need to take my word for it, some investigating on your own on the adobe forums might enlighten you.

the 680 is NOT based on the 5XX series; it is a completely different die set; the kepler as opposed to fermi. it has a completely different transistor count, frame buffer and, as said before, die set. the overall architecture maybe the same but by dropping the shader clock and stream lining the core clock it changed how it flows from the instruction set to the cuda core to then the texture units. to say it is similar to but not based off of; as about as accurate as saying ivy bridge is based off of sandy bridge.

no offense, i am sure you are an awesome wedding videotographer and provide lasting cherished results to your customers. but please do not make sweeping generalizations with your experiences.
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March 27, 2012 1:58:49 PM

Ivy bridge is based directly from sandy bridge. It is a die shrink with a better gpu. Arguing that it is not goes against everything stated by Intel and every rumor/review on the internet.

Adobe does have a very close relationship with nVidia even if it is not an official 'partnership'. This is why CUDA is supported and AMD's compute modules (can't remember their name off the top of my head) are not supported.

Several review sites have shown quite clearly that the 580/570s are directly related to the Quadro cards, and simply have different drivers. The 560 and below are different animals that game well even though they are still under the label of 'firmi', but have terrible compute performance because they are not designed to be fully featured cards. the 680 behaves like a 560 in terms of gaming well, but having terrible compute performance. CUDA cores (if at all similar to Firmi's CUDA cores) should translate to compute performance even if it is not a direct comparison, and in the 680 it simply does not. While not all review sites have made a direct comparison, there have been some (Anandtech comes to mind) which do point out the similarities. Firmi was the first to my knowledge that had any significant crossover between productivity cards like Quadro, and gaming cards like GTX, and it would not surprise me in the least to see them go back to having very distinct and separate product lines again.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5699/nvidia-geforce-gtx-6...
The 580 knocks the socks off of the 680 in compute performance. Will this translate directly to CUDA performance? I don't know. Am I willing to state that the 680 WILL be better? not when there is 0 evidence to show that it might.

As to the hack; I have seen some uses of it where it works perfectly fine, and others where it just causes issues, and have read some reviews that said that while it worked it did not boost performance to a point where it justified purchasing an extra card. Asside from that, according to the rules of the forums we are not supposed to encourage illegal behavior (like using a hack that breaks EULA). The hack may, or may not work. I am not willing to promote spending money on parts that are entirely a shot in the dark.

I have not seen a benchmark on Premiere yet with the 680, but if you are right then the hack would work fine. But are you saying he SHOULD purchase a product that is 20% of his budget that may, or possibly may not, work? Especially when there are cheaper products on the market that DO work; and work very well.

And what do you mean by that last sentence? All that anyone has to base anything on is reviews and personal experience. If we went by raw specs on everything then bulldozer should be the best thing ever, when it was largely a flop (granted not as much of a flop as some make it out to be, but still not the stellar product we were looking for, and a little expensive for what it can do). The fact is that there are no reviews of the 680 yet when relating to this particular use. And until there is something credible out there then it is responsible to waste someone's money unless you are claiming to have done this type of setup yourself.
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March 27, 2012 2:14:38 PM

If caedenv is right then kevin2 should better go with gtx 580 or a 570

@kevin2 i would change the build link to make updates

1. change gpu from gtx 680 2gb to gtx 580 3gb

2. to change the ram from 4x4 gb to 4x8 gb

3. to change the motherboard from asus x79 sabertooth to asrock x79 extreme4

4. to change the monitor from 23" 1080 ips 16:9 to 24" 1200 ips 16:10

5. and few minor changes if needed.
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March 27, 2012 3:45:09 PM

serialkiller said:
The updated build

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx...

i still dont recommend a raid setup as it is very complex needs some skills and should be looked with care.


A bit late in the game, but I have to disagree with you. RAID is simple, it is not complex.

Maybe this draft article about a new PC for video editing with Adobe Premiere Pro can shed some light:

http://ppbm6.com/Planning.html

The hardware forum may also be informative. http://forums.adobe.com/community/premiere/hardware_for...

The drawback here is that everything is about low budget gaming systems, and video editing systems do not fit in.

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March 27, 2012 3:55:42 PM

*Ahem* The 680 Compute performance isn't helping, if you are making a professional computer get an Nvidia Quadro.
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March 27, 2012 4:26:38 PM

but he also want to game on his comp
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March 27, 2012 5:03:22 PM

Hazbot said:
*Ahem* The 680 Compute performance isn't helping, if you are making a professional computer get an Nvidia Quadro.


You are correct that a Quadro is more professional. Professional means your boss is footing the bill, so don't worry about the cost. What you end up with is a seriously underspecced, underperforming and overpriced card.

If you have to fund it yourself, stay away from Quadro.
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March 27, 2012 5:10:41 PM

+1 ^
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March 27, 2012 6:04:11 PM

Harm Millaard said:
You are correct that a Quadro is more professional. Professional means your boss is footing the bill, so don't worry about the cost. What you end up with is a seriously underspecced, underperforming and overpriced card.

If you have to fund it yourself, stay away from Quadro.


Ok, should have read more, although I'd still opt for something like a 7970 which performs better in computing tasks.
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March 27, 2012 6:07:33 PM

I don't want to game. I still have to regain the strength in my right arm from my last embolization (AVM in cerebellum,) so I haven't even tried gaming. I tried to play basketball even and it embarrassing how awful I was.
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March 27, 2012 6:09:51 PM

ohh sorry i got confused as so many threads.

still go for gtx 580 3gb

it is supported , nice gpu computing power , and lot of computing power.

i would look for some quadro replacement.
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