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Middle of road high end Build! $2000-2500

Last response: in Systems
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March 25, 2012 10:58:57 PM

I am planning to get a 2700K chip and was wondering if the ASUS pro/gen3 z68 platform would be best or a gigabyte equivalent. also using Thermaltake Frio Clp-0575 would not clear a Vengeance chip in the first memory slot?

Primary Hard Drive would be a SSD 120 - 256GB on the high side when prices come down.

Secondary Hard Drive would be a pair of 600GB Western Digital Velociraptor

Graphics GTX 550 ti Super Clocked By EVGA

3 -200 cooling fans

1-140 cooling fan

1-120 cooling fan


5 switch for cooling fans
March 25, 2012 11:10:26 PM

Quote:
Secondary Hard Drive would be a pair of 600GB Western Digital Velociraptor


No - I hate the Velociraptor HDs, anything over 7200 RPM - you won't notice any gain in performance. You want a good SSD / HD combination.

Quote:
Graphics GTX 550 ti Super Clocked By EVGA


$2500 build and you're going for a $140 GPU? I wouldn't even trust that GPU on a $400 build - there's far better out there.

Try this:

Case: Corsair Carbide 500R - $139.99
PSU: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MKII 950W - $149.99
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3P - $189.99
CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K - $219.99
Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo - $34.99
RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 8GB 1333 MHz - $42.99
SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 - $164.99
HD: Seagate Barracuda Green 2TB - $119.99
Optical: Lite On BD-R Burner - $59.99
Video Card: 2 x EVGA Geforce GTX 680 - $499.99 each

Total: $2,119.38

The difference will give you more than enough for OS, monitor, and a good keyboard and mouse. If you want X79 I can also suggest a build around that.
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March 25, 2012 11:18:37 PM

He could also consider the Noctua NH D14 or the Thermalright Silver Arrows for CPU Coolers.
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March 25, 2012 11:42:14 PM

Quote:
Primary Hard Drive would be a SSD 120 - 256GB on the high side when prices come down.

SSD prices aren't going to drop for a while. Since the hard drive shortage, they've actually been selling pretty well because HDDs cost more than some SSDs.

Quote:
Secondary Hard Drive would be a pair of 600GB Western Digital Velociraptor

As G-Unit said, these are a total waste of money.

Quote:
Case: Corsair Carbide 500R - $139.99
PSU: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MKII 950W - $149.99
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3P - $189.99
CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K - $219.99
Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo - $34.99
RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 8GB 1333 MHz - $42.99
SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 - $164.99
HD: Seagate Barracuda Green 2TB - $119.99
Optical: Lite On BD-R Burner - $59.99
Video Card: 2 x EVGA Geforce GTX 680 - $499.99 each

+1. This build is easily good for several years, has reliable parts, and saves you money in the right places.
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March 26, 2012 12:04:32 AM

My build also includes cool master case HAF 922M Standard for $85.00, 2 x 23" Acer and 1 x 20" Acer LED Monitor In the build also. Graphic card choice is not so crucial to the performance. Reliable Configuration is more important than Sacrificing Quality of CPU chip communication with hard drive and memory taken into consideration.

Dirt cheap on minor parts does not always equal super performance.
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March 26, 2012 12:06:19 AM

I recommend you get one 23" and 2 20inches on the sides. :) 
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March 26, 2012 12:13:42 AM

Power supply is a PC Power & cooling Silencer 760 watt for $80.00 at Micro Center

Monitors would be the 20 in the middle and a 23 flanking left and right of the 20
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March 26, 2012 12:17:05 AM

more than half of the stuff will have store warranty included in the $2000-2500 Price
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March 26, 2012 12:18:07 AM

Why do you want bigger monitors on the sides?
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March 26, 2012 12:40:44 AM

Quote:
Graphic card choice is not so crucial to the performance.

What is this build for then? Most GPU manufacturers are at about the same level of reliability (with some exceptions), so there usually isn't too much of a reason to go with one manufacturer over another unless there are better components/warranty terms.

IMHO there's no better NVIDIA manufacturer than EVGA.

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Reliable Configuration is more important than Sacrificing Quality of CPU chip communication with hard drive and memory taken into consideration.

...all of the parts that G-unit listed are reliable parts (with the exception of the HDD - those are all iffy thanks to the flooding), but I would spend my own money on those parts. We're not just throwing out random parts just 'cause.

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Dirt cheap on minor parts does not always equal super performance.

But overspending on minor parts doesn't necessarily warrant better performance over the cheaper ones.
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March 26, 2012 2:01:07 AM

2 x 8 GB corsair Vengeance Memory chips
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March 26, 2012 2:05:54 AM

For gaming, it isn't needed. Max RAM for gaming is 4-6gb utilization.
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Best solution

March 26, 2012 2:06:07 AM

solidwood said:
My build also includes cool master case HAF 922M Standard for $85.00, 2 x 23" Acer and 1 x 20" Acer LED Monitor In the build also. Graphic card choice is not so crucial to the performance. Reliable Configuration is more important than Sacrificing Quality of CPU chip communication with hard drive and memory taken into consideration.

Dirt cheap on minor parts does not always equal super performance.


GPU choice is *ABSOLUTELY* crucial to the performance of the build. The wrong GPU - like the 550TI will not give you the frame rates you want in high end games like Skyrim or BF3. With the components I'm recommending you're not sacrificing anything for quality - and you get two of the best video card on the market currently - and the thing is in the PC world - there's areas where you get what you pay for and that's especially true among the GPUs and PSUs. These two areas of the build are the most important parts of the build - bar none - and you do not want to skimp or compormise, I can't stress that enough.

Quote:
What is this build for then? Most GPU manufacturers are at about the same level of reliability (with some exceptions), so there usually isn't too much of a reason to go with one manufacturer over another unless there are better components/warranty terms.

IMHO there's no better NVIDIA manufacturer than EVGA.


Absolutely - I use EVGA pretty much exclusively for NVIDIA-based cards (their headquarters is right down the street from where I work), and I use Sapphire and XFX for Radeon-based cards. EVGA's 10 year warranty is pretty much unmatched anywhere, except for maybe XFX's double lifetime warranty.

RAM and storage is pretty much an after thought any more - sure, an SSD will drastically increase or decrease load times but secondary storage and RAM shouldn't be that big of an issue in terms of overclocking your build.
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March 26, 2012 2:07:45 AM

If you want advise, accept the advice others are giving.
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March 26, 2012 2:50:10 AM

Well My usage for a GPU is Things like playing a 3d game (lower requirements) against the CPU, Minimal online 3d required games, and least but not last online buffering of media for smooth viewing of video and refresh rate of streaming, recorded, updating internet web page info that you are logged into.

I do not see me spending Near 200-250 on EVGA Nivedia for stuff I intend to play or watch.


I am trying just to move up to the top 30% of I-chip standard PC Configuration. Not at the bottom of the Mountain waiting for something in a off the shelf unit to try run touch screen apps on a pentium 3 or 4 or dual core.

In other words, Join the people at gaming level with out burning my pocket to empty.

The advice is good OK

Some of the cards everyone is recommending are really expensive I may not likely put enough hours on cards above 200- 600

The advice is good OK
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March 26, 2012 2:51:00 AM

Best answer selected by solidwood.
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