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New Build to replace 4 yr old pc

Last response: in Systems
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March 26, 2012 3:25:34 AM

I want a new pc for long term gaming mainly, but would like it to be able to handle pretty much anything I throw at it. How does this sound for a new build?

Intel Core i7-3820
ASUS Sabertooth X79 MoBo
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 X 4GB) DDR3 1866
Mushkin Enhanced Cronos 240GB SSB (OS/Game drive)
WD Caviar Black 1.5TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0 Gb/s (Data drive)
LG Black 12X Multi Blue w/ 3D Playback & M-DISC Support
OCZ ZX Series 1250W PS
Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Blue Edition
Phanteks PH-TC14PE CPU Cooler
ASUS VS248H-P 24" HDMI LED Backlight Widescreen

As for graphics, I'm trying to decide if I want to wait until I can get my hands on a 680 GTX or go ahead and get 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 448 Cores FTW. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... I've had great experiences w/ NVIDIA & EVGA, so I plan on sticking with them.

As for overclocking/SLI, both are a maybe right now. I want to get it built & be able to go from there. My budget is approx $2500 and this build is comfortably in there with either graphics choice.

More about : build replace

a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 3:42:05 AM

Quote:
As for graphics, I'm trying to decide if I want to wait until I can get my hands on a 680 GTX or go ahead and get 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 448 Cores FTW. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6814130738 I've had great experiences w/ NVIDIA & EVGA, so I plan on sticking with them.


No - get a 680, when it comes to GPUs, you want the strongest single solution you can get for your budget as opposed to two weaker ones. That build looks really solid.

While EVGA is a great company, I'd suggest that if you do want a kick-ass dual GPU setup go for dual Radeon 7870s - a single 7870 easily topples the 570TI and comes close to toppling the 580. Two in Crossfire would completely destroy anything in its' path.

I also wouldn't get that PSU - this would be a better choice:

- Seasonic X1050 Gold: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
- NZXT Hale 90: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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March 26, 2012 5:06:27 AM

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No - get a 680, when it comes to GPUs, you want the strongest single solution you can get for your budget as opposed to two weaker ones. That build looks really solid.

While EVGA is a great company, I'd suggest that if you do want a kick-ass dual GPU setup go for dual Radeon 7870s - a single 7870 easily topples the 570TI and comes close to toppling the 580. Two in Crossfire would completely destroy anything in its' path.


That's what I was thinking as far as the 680, my only concern is how long I will have to wait until they're back in stock @ Newegg or EVGA.

Quote:
I also wouldn't get that PSU - this would be a better choice:

- Seasonic X1050 Gold: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
- NZXT Hale 90: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Those look nice. Do you know of any quality issues for the OCZ? I've looked @ their forums and didn't see any major/frequent complaints. From the reviews I've read, the OCZ is rated very good, 8-9/10 and on Newegg I can bundle it with the G.Skill ram for a $30 savings plus it has a $30 MIR. That would bring the cost of it down to $179.99.
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March 26, 2012 6:00:02 AM

lpedraja2002 said:
If I were you I would get a Core i5 and use the money saved on a better/bigger monitor:

http://tinyurl.com/6sr7ybq


Swapping to Core i5 would also require swapping to a different mobo. I'm really interested in the features of the Sabertooth board, from the TUF Thermal Armor/Radar & Components to the SSD caching and expansion possibility of going up to 64GB of RAM. Also, on the Sabertooth, the PCIe 3.0 will do dual @ x16, when I decide to SLI the 680 I want.

The change would be approx. $200.

As for a bigger monitor, 24" is enough for me. If I want anything bigger, I'll just hook up to my TV. :) 
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a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 5:54:30 PM

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That's what I was thinking as far as the 680, my only concern is how long I will have to wait until they're back in stock @ Newegg or EVGA.


Shouldn't be more than a couple weeks - I really want a 7870 and they seem to be disappearing as quickly, but Newegg has been pretty good about keeping stock.

Quote:
Swapping to Core i5 would also require swapping to a different mobo. I'm really interested in the features of the Sabertooth board, from the TUF Thermal Armor/Radar & Components to the SSD caching and expansion possibility of going up to 64GB of RAM. Also, on the Sabertooth, the PCIe 3.0 will do dual @ x16, when I decide to SLI the 680 I want.


You're definitely better off sticking with X79 - the bigger monitor can wait - it's always easier to add newer monitors later.

Quote:
Those look nice. Do you know of any quality issues for the OCZ? I've looked @ their forums and didn't see any major/frequent complaints. From the reviews I've read, the OCZ is rated very good, 8-9/10 and on Newegg I can bundle it with the G.Skill ram for a $30 savings plus it has a $30 MIR. That would bring the cost of it down to $179.99.


OCZ has a pretty iffy reputation on the PSU market. They've got significantly better since their acquisition of PC Power & Cooling but they still remain as separate companies.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 5:56:46 PM

X79 and a 3820 is a waste of money, as is 16 GB of RAM.
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a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 6:05:13 PM

FinneousPJ said:
X79 and a 3820 is a waste of money, as is 16 GB of RAM.


Explain please. X79 is far more future proof than Z68 and P67 will be - after the dust is settled with Ivy, SB-E will still be around where Z68 and P67 are dead ends after Ivy.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 9:16:39 PM

It's just not worth the price difference over a 1155 CPU. Moreover the 3820 is like a V6 Mustang, a poser-ish piece of kit for the people who don't understand what a proper muscle car is about.
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a c 93 B Homebuilt system
March 26, 2012 10:52:25 PM

I look at it like X58 and P55 - you *NEVER* see any P55 builds around anymore but you still see plenty of X58 builds around. In a couple of years - you'll see most people trading in their Z68 and Z77 builds for whatever the next big thing may be (post-Ivy? Piledriver? Something else) but you'll still see plenty of X79 builds around. If you're going to build a $2K+ system you might as well get the best you can get for the money rather than having to buy the same part twice, am I right?
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 27, 2012 6:50:08 AM

The 3820 is still pretty much equal to a 2600K. At least go for the six core chips if you want the best.
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March 27, 2012 7:36:30 AM

As g-unit stated, the choice of the X79 was an attempt to "future proof" as best possible. My current pc was built in Feb 08, just after the E8400 was released. Unfortunately, the next "advance" in CPU came later that year in the form of a new socket type. There's been 4 sockets for Intel since then: 1366, 1156, 1155, and 2011. My plan/hope is that the 2011 will be around for at least 2 more years and I will be able to further upgrade the CPU during that time.

I would have loved to been able to get the hex core i7 3930, but that would have been almost double in price as the 3820. My overall budget was $2500 and this setup comes in @ approximately $1900 BEFORE getting a video card. Knowing that the 680 GTX is $500, that puts me pretty much right on target. The 3930 would've cost $290 more. Also, the 3820 is currently the same price as the 2600K with a $15 promo gift card on Newegg.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 27, 2012 8:06:13 AM

Whether you buy the 2500K or the 3820 it doesn't matter because you won't need to upgrade the CPU in 2 more years and when you do it's going to be best to buy into the newest platform. Again.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 27, 2012 8:27:15 AM

I don't understand why people are listing 1000w+ PSU's.....

The new Gen (7xxx and 6xx) series use very little power.

My suggestion would be to buy a 7970, more powerful than a single GTX 580 and will run on a 500w PSU. If you want the option to add a second card, grab a 750w/850w PSU. Certainly nothing higher than an 850w is required so save yourself some money here.

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