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Sandy vs Ivy Buying Soon

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July 9, 2012 3:44:14 PM

Is there any reason to choose the Ivy bridge over Sandy? Looks like Sandy will easily OC to 4.5. Am I missing something here (something present that will be important)?

Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Ivy 199
Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Sandy 205

Thanks All!

More about : sandy ivy buying

Anonymous
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July 9, 2012 4:00:24 PM

a ivy i5-3570K is what can overclock and is more expensive than a sandy.
it offers an increase in performance generally 5%-12% though the sandy bridge can overclock higher w/o getting temp issues to compensate. the only real advantage is PCI 3.0 but that is only with a multi-graphics card set up with multiple monitors.
July 9, 2012 4:09:29 PM

I had the same conundrum. It's worth considering the motherboards too: sometimes you can get far more out of a Z77 than out of a Z68 for slightly more money.
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July 9, 2012 4:53:25 PM

Anonymous said:
a ivy i5-3570K is what can overclock and is more expensive than a sandy.
it offers an increase in performance generally 5%-12% though the sandy bridge can overclock higher w/o getting temp issues to compensate. the only real advantage is PCI 3.0 but that is only with a multi-graphics card set up with multiple monitors.



The release ivy bridge chips had the heat issues. The newer batchs are overclocking just fine.
a c 109 à CPUs
July 9, 2012 4:56:17 PM

I would personally get the Ivy Bridge i5 as it's newer technology, and it's overclocking capabilities are just fine IMO. It might not reach 4.8-5Ghz as Sandy does, but it'll still perform just as well, if not better, than Sandy due to it's higher IPC :) 
July 9, 2012 5:09:13 PM

Good about the 3570K is more powerful integrated graphics, but if you have a dedicated video card, this will not matter. It also requires less power(18W less Max TDP according to intel). Lastly, the 3570K allows a higher memory bandwidth, and will perform slightly better than a 2500K at the same clock rates.

The 2500K in the other hand comes a few coin cheaper, and usually lets itself overclock a bit higher.
a c 109 à CPUs
July 9, 2012 5:11:00 PM

Avaruz said:
Good about the 3570K is more powerful integrated graphics, but if you have a dedicated video card, this will not matter. It also requires less power(18W less Max TDP according to intel). Lastly, the 3570K allows a higher memory bandwidth, and will perform slightly better than a 2500K at the same clock rates.

The 2500K in the other hand comes a few coin cheaper, and usually lets itself overclock a bit higher.


Adding onto this, the better IGP may come in handy if the OP likes to convert video files :D  VirtuMVP is very nice from the looks of it :lol: 
Anonymous
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July 9, 2012 6:02:58 PM

Lucem Ferre said:
The release ivy bridge chips had the heat issues. The newer batchs are overclocking just fine.

never said they did not overclock well.

and since when has there been a "different batch"? got an article link?
unless intel changed the amount of transistors or die size, there would be no difference.
July 9, 2012 6:05:31 PM

Lucem Ferre said:
The release ivy bridge chips had the heat issues. The newer batchs are overclocking just fine.


What Are they able to OC the new batches CPU to with just aftermarket CPU fans?
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July 9, 2012 6:46:44 PM

mchljrdn said:
What Are they able to OC the new batches CPU to with just aftermarket CPU fans?


I'm not sure about this 'batch' theory, but someone on this forum has overclocked their i7 3770k to 4.8Ghz...I forgot what cooler they were using, though. Maybe he got lucky but either way, it's still too early to tell.

But on most Ivy Bridge chips, the max you can overclock to within thermal threshold is around 4.5Ghz.
Anonymous
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July 9, 2012 6:52:57 PM

^ that is a fair assessment.
ivy @ 4.5 = sandy @ 4.8

i checked the intel site and all ivy bridge processors are still E1 stepping. if there was a "different batch" there would be another stepping listed.
a c 109 à CPUs
July 9, 2012 6:54:54 PM

Anonymous said:
^ that is a fair assessment.
ivy @ 4.5 = sandy @ 4.8

i checked the intel site and all ivy bridge processors are still E1 stepping. if there was a "different batch" there would be another stepping listed.


And considering most Sandy's will only get up to 4.8 anyway, it's a fair trade off IMO :D 
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July 9, 2012 7:19:30 PM

Anonymous said:
^ that is a fair assessment.
ivy @ 4.5 = sandy @ 4.8

i checked the intel site and all ivy bridge processors are still E1 stepping. if there was a "different batch" there would be another stepping listed.


+1 looniam

There has been some people saying that we are going to release a new stepping to deal with the heat on the 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors when they are overclocked. The answer to this is no there are no plans to make any changes to the 3rd generation to make them better for overclocking. So while there might be some new steppings that come out in the future that are just in the normal development of our processor lifespan there won't be any moves back to solder or changes the TIM (Thermal Interface Material).
July 9, 2012 7:24:41 PM

mocchan said:
I'm not sure about this 'batch' theory, but someone on this forum has overclocked their i7 3770k to 4.8Ghz...I forgot what cooler they were using, though. Maybe he got lucky but either way, it's still too early to tell.

But on most Ivy Bridge chips, the max you can overclock to within thermal threshold is around 4.5Ghz.



I have my 3770K overclocked to 4.8Ghz and i'll go higher tonight with a coolermaster TPC 812
a c 109 à CPUs
July 9, 2012 7:27:59 PM

Lucem Ferre said:
I have my 3770K overclocked to 4.8Ghz and i'll go higher tonight with a coolermaster TPC 812

Let us know how it goes :) 
!