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Gaming Rigs (Desktop)

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March 28, 2012 5:24:22 AM

So i wanted to build my own gaming computer or at least get all my parts together and get one of my friends to help me put it together since i'm totally new to building Desktops. The problem is, as i said before i'm brand new at this and wanted to make sure all my parts are compatible. Well, to begin i would need a Rig that would last me at least a couple of years. In addition i would like to ask for a couple tips when building my own rig in the future, i guess me maximum price range would be around 1000$.
So far i have looked at
Hard Drive [Seagate Barracuda ST2000DM001 2TB Serial ATA Hard Drive - 2TB, 7200RPM, 64MB, SATA 6Gb/s] (doesn't really need to be 2TB, 1-1.5 would be fine).
Video Card HIS H685FN1GD Radeon HD 6850 Video Card - 1GB, GDDR5 (not sure if i should go NVIDIA or AMD).
Processor Intel Core i5-2400 BX80623I52400 Processor - Quad Core, 6MB L3 Cache, 1MB L2 Cache, 3.10 GHz (3.40 GHz Max Turbo), Socket H2 (LGA1155), 95W, Fan, Retail (i don't need an i7 for gaming).
Memory/RAM Corsair CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B Vengeance Desktop Memory Kit - 8GB (2x 4GB), PC3-12800, DDR3-1600MHz (id prefer 8GB +, although im 99% sure 8 GB of memory is enough).
MOBO ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3 Intel Z68 Motherboard - ATX, Intel Z68 Express, Socket H2 (LGA1155), 2200MHz DDR3 (O.C.), SATA 6.0 Gb/s, RAID, 8-CH Audio, Gigabit LAN, USB 3.0, PCIe 3.0, CrossFireX/SLI, Bluetooth (Now i know that the processor will fit into the MOBO, and im iffy on the memory, and completely lost on the graphics card).
For the power supply and the System case, im open to suggestions.
I appreciate all help given, thank you.

More about : gaming rigs desktop

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March 28, 2012 7:29:19 AM

HDD - 129.99
GPU - 139.99
CPU - 189.99
RAM - 49.99
MOBO - 179.99
Total ~~ $690 (without tax)

I'd say you're doing pretty well so far, everything looks compatible and you've managed to make quite a few good choices. Good brands for everything it seems. As for the GPU, I always prefer AMD (former ATI). They may not stack up when it comes to their CPU, but they do make great video cards.

As for ram, 8gb is more than enough to do...just about anything. Good choice there. And you're using ddr3 ram, so that's all compatible.

As for the power supply and case, I'd try to go for a package deal there. Will save you a bit of money. This is somewhat cheap option, will give you a 500w power supply, which is plenty for your rig, and a pretty nice case with some cool lights and whatnot (plus black is always cool):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

That will bring you up to about $832. The leftover money can be spent on a nice keyboard/mouse/monitor/headset/whatever. peripherals are generally forgotten when people do builds like this, so keep that in mind through all of this.

Oh, and don't forget that you also need some kind of operating system, so keep that in mind too. If you haven't already gotten that, remember that some versions of Windows 7 limit the amount of RAM you can use. Windows 7 64 bit Basic edition supports 8gb, and the Home Premium edition supports up to 16gb. Everything above that supports higher, more unnecessary amounts of ram.


I really like your motherboard, it's pretty new and should last a while. Supports USB 3.0, and has extra PCI-E slots for more video cards, or sound cards, or wireless cards, or whatever else you wanna put into that. Anyways, good luck with your build, I certainly hope it goes well. I think you did a pretty good job picking parts.
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March 28, 2012 4:38:07 PM

tidus1112 said:
HDD - 129.99
GPU - 139.99
CPU - 189.99
RAM - 49.99
MOBO - 179.99
Total ~~ $690 (without tax)

I'd say you're doing pretty well so far, everything looks compatible and you've managed to make quite a few good choices. Good brands for everything it seems. As for the GPU, I always prefer AMD (former ATI). They may not stack up when it comes to their CPU, but they do make great video cards.

As for ram, 8gb is more than enough to do...just about anything. Good choice there. And you're using ddr3 ram, so that's all compatible.

As for the power supply and case, I'd try to go for a package deal there. Will save you a bit of money. This is somewhat cheap option, will give you a 500w power supply, which is plenty for your rig, and a pretty nice case with some cool lights and whatnot (plus black is always cool):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

That will bring you up to about $832. The leftover money can be spent on a nice keyboard/mouse/monitor/headset/whatever. peripherals are generally forgotten when people do builds like this, so keep that in mind through all of this.

Oh, and don't forget that you also need some kind of operating system, so keep that in mind too. If you haven't already gotten that, remember that some versions of Windows 7 limit the amount of RAM you can use. Windows 7 64 bit Basic edition supports 8gb, and the Home Premium edition supports up to 16gb. Everything above that supports higher, more unnecessary amounts of ram.


I really like your motherboard, it's pretty new and should last a while. Supports USB 3.0, and has extra PCI-E slots for more video cards, or sound cards, or wireless cards, or whatever else you wanna put into that. Anyways, good luck with your build, I certainly hope it goes well. I think you did a pretty good job picking parts.

Thank you so much for your quick response and your suggestion on a power supply and case. I will be getting a 64 bit windows 7 OS, i think my University offers Windows and Office for free, i'll probably try to take advantage of that. As for a peripherals, i do currently have a mouse that i will be using, i haven't picked out a keyboard and i didn't think the monitor was all that important to list. I'm happy everything i picked out so far is compatible, and thank you for your input.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 28, 2012 5:09:35 PM

Desk said:
Thank you so much for your quick response and your suggestion on a power supply and case. I will be getting a 64 bit windows 7 OS, i think my University offers Windows and Office for free, i'll probably try to take advantage of that. As for a peripherals, i do currently have a mouse that i will be using, i haven't picked out a keyboard and i didn't think the monitor was all that important to list. I'm happy everything i picked out so far is compatible, and thank you for your input.

Your build looks pretty good however I'd go with this CPU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I also wouldn't buy a case/PSU combo - rarely are they any good - of course the link above is broken so I can't see what was suggested - it might be the exception.
I'd go with this case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
and this PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Computers are not something that we build everyday. You should build a system that will be able to grow with you - with as little added cost/replacement parts as possible. The items I picked out will handle anything you wish to do - now and in the future. All the best with your build.
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March 28, 2012 5:21:54 PM

All your choices are good. As for your GPU, AMD or Nvidia it really is up to individual preference. I'm an Nvidia fanboy so you know what I'll tell you haha. Some games are AMD "biased" and some Nvidia. ie they tend to give you better fps, and give you better performance on that particular game though sometimes the difference is not very visible.
Good luck in your build ;) 
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 28, 2012 5:35:10 PM

BlackIce247 said:
All your choices are good. As for your GPU, AMD or Nvidia it really is up to individual preference. I'm an Nvidia fanboy so you know what I'll tell you haha. Some games are AMD "biased" and some Nvidia. ie they tend to give you better fps, and give you better performance on that particular game though sometimes the difference is not very visible.
Good luck in your build ;) 

Notice that my avatar isn't red so I'm with you on the GPU. Mainly because it seems that no one at AMD can produce a decent driver. Ever.
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March 28, 2012 5:49:36 PM

Chaz21 said:
Notice that my avatar isn't red so I'm with you on the GPU. Mainly because it seems that no one at AMD can produce a decent driver. Ever.


Haha!! I'm not too sure about AMD's drivers, I'm actually quite a newbie at GPUs but i've had my trusty MSI 7300LE for about 5 years now. It doesn't play games well but has not failed me throughout these years. Runs quiet too lol. I'm planning to save up and build a PC, might use a GTX 560ti - no cash lol. I know Nvidia are quite reliable in the drivers department, a few haven't worked too well for my friends though. Can't remember the driver's serial id offhand.

Oh yea @Desk, I'm with tidus, get the 2500k because of the unlocked core multiplier (overclocking). If you do attempt at an overclock, you can easily run your processor for an additional 2 years ++ provided you're cooling it sufficiently well. I didn't see i5-2400 lol thought it was 2500
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March 28, 2012 7:59:04 PM

Chaz21 said:
Your build looks pretty good however I'd go with this CPU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I also wouldn't buy a case/PSU combo - rarely are they any good - of course the link above is broken so I can't see what was suggested - it might be the exception.
I'd go with this case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
and this PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Computers are not something that we build everyday. You should build a system that will be able to grow with you - with as little added cost/replacement parts as possible. The items I picked out will handle anything you wish to do - now and in the future. All the best with your build.

Thank you for your suggestions, as far as the CPU you mentioned, that was actually the other one i had looked at. I don't see much a difference between the processors, but if anyone would like to fill me in the would be great :) .
In addition i have another question i'd like to ask about the system units/cases, how would i actually know if the case would be big enough for the parts i am intending to get?
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March 28, 2012 8:15:20 PM

Best answer selected by Desk.
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March 28, 2012 8:27:12 PM

Desk said:
Thank you for your suggestions, as far as the CPU you mentioned, that was actually the other one i had looked at. I don't see much a difference between the processors, but if anyone would like to fill me in the would be great :) .
In addition i have another question i'd like to ask about the system units/cases, how would i actually know if the case would be big enough for the parts i am intending to get?



The processor will give you slightly better performance, given that it's running at 3.3ghz instead of 3.1ghz. It is a bit more expensive, but you can definitely expect better performance out of it. Also, the card will run about 3.7ghz at full load, whereas the one you chose runs 3.4ghz. Also, if you ever feel like getting into it, I believe the card Chaz mentioned is also easier to overclock, or at least more overclockable.

If you've got some extra money, it'd be easy to just go with this card and save you from upgrading in the future. Not absolutely necessary, but you will see a slight improvement in performance.

Personally, just because I always spend as close to the max on my budget as possibly >.> (and usually a little over) I'd just go with the card Chaz mentioned. It's all a matter of how much money you're willing to spend, though.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 28, 2012 8:34:14 PM

Desk said:
Thank you for your suggestions, as far as the CPU you mentioned, that was actually the other one i had looked at. I don't see much a difference between the processors, but if anyone would like to fill me in the would be great :) .
In addition i have another question i'd like to ask about the system units/cases, how would i actually know if the case would be big enough for the parts i am intending to get?

The 2500k is a little faster than the 2400 and of course it can be overclocked easily (even with the stock HSF).
As long as you get a mid or full atx case anything you pick will fit. Add-on GPU's and cooling setups might dictate your choices of those items though.
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March 28, 2012 8:51:39 PM

You all are so helpful, usually i just get a douchebaggy response, anyways i went on Newegg and made a revised list. This is in no way my final list i am still open to suggestions.
CPU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
MOBO http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM/Memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GPU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
HDD http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Totally open to suggestions on any of these parts, i have plenty of time to pick out my parts since ill be buying one i choose over the summer.
I actually do have another question concerning optical drives, since i'm totally knew at this and this is my first time actually picking out parts. Would i need to buy optical drives separately and just slot them in, or would the cases come with them?
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 28, 2012 9:03:28 PM

Desk said:
You all are so helpful, usually i just get a douchebaggy response, anyways i went on Newegg and made a revised list. This is in no way my final list i am still open to suggestions.
CPU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
MOBO http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM/Memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GPU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
HDD http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Totally open to suggestions on any of these parts, i have plenty of time to pick out my parts since ill be buying one i choose over the summer.
I actually do have another question concerning optical drives, since i'm totally knew at this and this is my first time actually picking out parts. Would i need to buy optical drives separately and just slot them in, or would the cases come with them?

They are bought separately. You may want one that handles Blu-Ray's who knows. Thanks for the thanks.
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March 28, 2012 9:20:09 PM

As others had mentioned, it would be best to get the case and psu separately because the cheap psu will fail and might be a fire hazard. There are a few highly trusted brands, seasonic, corsair, antec, and some others, that make very good psus for decent prices, and they would fit well in a build with a $1000 budget.

As for building the computer itself, it's much easier than you'd think. I had never built one until a week ago, and it was very easy, but time consuming. I used newegg's youtube vids on how to build a computer, as well as some other sources for specific parts. Just be prepared to spend 3-6 hours (if you factor in sw installation) building it.
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March 28, 2012 9:39:23 PM

brewspy said:
As others had mentioned, it would be best to get the case and psu separately because the cheap psu will fail and might be a fire hazard. There are a few highly trusted brands, seasonic, corsair, antec, and some others, that make very good psus for decent prices, and they would fit well in a build with a $1000 budget.

As for building the computer itself, it's much easier than you'd think. I had never built one until a week ago, and it was very easy, but time consuming. I used newegg's youtube vids on how to build a computer, as well as some other sources for specific parts. Just be prepared to spend 3-6 hours (if you factor in sw installation) building it.

I am actually watching those Newegg videos right now :) .
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March 28, 2012 9:43:23 PM

Other than the optical drive, I guess you're all set. Sexy case, btw.

FYI, all of the cables and screws and stuff should come with the case/mobo. As long as you read all of the instructions for the motherboard, putting it together should be pretty easy. If you're building on carpet or something, make sure to touch a piece of metal or something somewhere so you don't shock the mobo. That would be a bad start to a build :p  Static electricity is bad.

Pretty awesome for a first build, hope it works out well for you.
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March 29, 2012 4:01:39 AM

Those Newegg videos are superb if you're attempting to build your own rig. :D  Like what others have said, get the 2500k if and only if you're interested in overclocking sometime in the future. If you're on a tight budget then stick with the 2400 or 2500 (w/o the K). They are all sandy bridge so you will definitely see a performance boost from your previous processors.
I usually build on a wooden table or floor, try avoiding carpets. Oh and take your time at building the pc once you build a few times speed up no sweat :)  Good luck i'm sure it will go well for you :D 
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