Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Does intel test all thier RMAs

Last response: in CPUs
Share
July 13, 2012 2:43:25 AM

I believed I had a faulty cpu and RMAd becuase I didnt want to pay a local shop 30$ to test it. It was aproved for waranty replacement. so basicly im asking if they test all thier RMAs or just passively replace it.

More about : intel test thier rmas

a c 109 à CPUs
July 13, 2012 2:49:35 AM

I think they inspect it at least, I'm not sure if they test all of their CPU's.

However, someone on this thread awhile back had tried to RMA their CPU due to an overclock gone wrong and they got a "Customer induced damage, RMA denied" type of claim :lol: 
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 2:52:27 AM

mocchan said:
However, someone on this thread awhile back had tried to RMA their CPU due to an overclock gone wrong and they got a "Customer induced damage, RMA denied" type of claim :lol: 


Which is why it's smart to get the Performance Tuning Protection Plan if you OC (assuming that it's an Intel K CPU)...
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 109 à CPUs
July 13, 2012 12:57:12 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Which is why it's smart to get the Performance Tuning Protection Plan if you OC (assuming that it's an Intel K CPU)...


Yep :lol:  it's quite cheap if I remember as well :) 
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 2:29:50 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Which is why it's smart to get the Performance Tuning Protection Plan if you OC (assuming that it's an Intel K CPU)...

I'd rather take Intel to court for selling a product under false pretence.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 2:46:39 PM

Lol yeah the whole pay more for an unlocked CPU, overclock-enabled mobo and to top it off an "insurance" is a ridiculous money milking scheme and is actually putting me off from upgrading. I guess my i7 is the last Intel CPU to actually have value in overclocking it - now you're paying a lot for the privilege.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 3:17:34 PM

The "Unlock Insurance" is a scam akin to the P.P.I scam that we have going on here in the UK and will one day be exposed as such IMHO.
m
0
l
July 13, 2012 5:44:06 PM

looks like they dont test it

"You are now chatting with '*********'

*********': Hello. Thank you for using the Intel Customer Chat Support service. We are glad to be of service. How may I help you?

ME: Hello, I recently RMAd a cpu and was granted a replacment, I was wondering if you actually test the cpu as I am determining whats bad in my system

*********': ***, beside the troubleshooting steps and / or information you provided to the technical agents, our Warranty Return Center only validate the markings on the
unit when it is received. We do not perform any test of the faulty units. \

ME: ok

ME: thanks

*********': It is been my pleasure to assist you with your warranty inquire. Is there anything else I can help you with ?

ME: nope, thats it, thanks"
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 5:50:29 PM

irsninja said:
looks like they dont test it

"You are now chatting with '*********'

*********': Hello. Thank you for using the Intel Customer Chat Support service. We are glad to be of service. How may I help you?

ME: Hello, I recently RMAd a cpu and was granted a replacment, I was wondering if you actually test the cpu as I am determining whats bad in my system

*********': ***, beside the troubleshooting steps and / or information you provided to the technical agents, our Warranty Return Center only validate the markings on the
unit when it is received. We do not perform any test of the faulty units. \

ME: ok

ME: thanks

*********': It is been my pleasure to assist you with your warranty inquire. Is there anything else I can help you with ?

ME: nope, thats it, thanks"

Hmm, so why would I need an extra insurance policy again? :heink: 
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 5:56:45 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Hmm, so why would I need an extra insurance policy again? :heink: 


I suppose you don't, as long as you LIE to them if you've been OC'ing. :lol:  :ange: 
m
0
l
July 13, 2012 5:58:59 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Hmm, so why would I need an extra insurance policy again? :heink: 


Guessing they deny it if it looks fried becuase its almost always a result of OC or Installing heat sync incorrectly
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 6:15:28 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
I suppose you don't, as long as you LIE to them if you've been OC'ing. :lol:  :ange: 

Why should I deny that I've been OC'ing a CPU that was sold with an unlocked multiplier?
That is after all why the sell the the same CPU in two formats, one locked and the other unlocked or is there another reason and if so what is it?
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 6:37:22 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Why should I deny that I've been OC'ing a CPU that was sold with an unlocked multiplier?
That is after all why the sell the the same CPU in two formats, one locked and the other unlocked or is there another reason and if so what is it?


Oh I don't disagree with that part AT ALL. The basic warranty for the K series CPU's SHOULD cover OC'ing and I don't get why it doesn't, other than, as you said, a way to get more money.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 6:42:15 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Why should I deny that I've been OC'ing a CPU that was sold with an unlocked multiplier?
That is after all why the sell the the same CPU in two formats, one locked and the other unlocked or is there another reason and if so what is it?



Overclocking usually involves more than just the frequency. If you bring the core voltage out of spec then there could be major problems. It's possible to have a voltage monitor in the chip that sets a bit/rom/fuse that can later be read to determine an over voltage occurred.

Not that much different than the water/moisture detectors that Apple puts in their iPod/iPhone to refuse warranty for water damage.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 6:43:14 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Oh I don't disagree with that part AT ALL. The basic warranty for the K series CPU's SHOULD cover OC'ing and I don't get why it doesn't, other than, as you said, a way to get more money.

Corporate insurance scams are really going down well in the UK at the moment, so I wish them luck with this one and I hope it works out well for them! :lol: 
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 6:55:37 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Oh I don't disagree with that part AT ALL. The basic warranty for the K series CPU's SHOULD cover OC'ing and I don't get why it doesn't, other than, as you said, a way to get more money.


Why should it? Intel publishes a datasheet which contains the absolute maximum voltage and temperature values that the product can safely withstand before neither functionality nor lifespan are guaranteed. Performance above the marketed values but below the absolute maximum isn't guaranteed but operation at factory settings is. If the device is run above the maximum specified in the datasheet then operation at factory settings can no longer be guaranteed.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 7:02:21 PM

Pinhedd said:
Why should it? Intel publishes a datasheet which contains the absolute maximum voltage and temperature values that the product can safely withstand before neither functionality nor lifespan are guaranteed. Performance above the marketed values but below the absolute maximum isn't guaranteed but operation at factory settings is. If the device is run above the maximum specified in the datasheet then operation at factory settings can no longer be guaranteed.


Because they KNOW that people will OC the K series CPU's. If they won't or CAN'T warranty that with the base warranty they shouldn't even sell them. Not warrantying OC'ng on an unlocked CPU that they KNOW will be OC'd is slightly ridiculous, don't you think?

With that said, I have the Protection Plan myself, but I still think I shouldn't even need to buy it to be completely safe.
m
0
l
July 13, 2012 7:05:34 PM

It wont always be OCd. some times sales, specials, rebates, etc make it cheaper to buy k. also, some people might buy it becuase ks typically have slightly higher stock speeds
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 7:18:36 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Because they KNOW that people will OC the K series CPU's. If they won't or CAN'T warranty that with the base warranty they shouldn't even sell them. Not warrantying OC'ng on an unlocked CPU that they KNOW will be OC'd is slightly ridiculous, don't you think?

With that said, I have the Protection Plan myself, but I still think I shouldn't even need to buy it to be completely safe.


Every CPU overclocks differently and has its own limit but it still takes a wanton amount of stupidity to physically damage a CPU to the point of complete non-functionality.

Providing a warranty for unsafe overclocking would be like providing insurance coverage for drunk driving.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 7:23:51 PM

Pinhedd said:
Providing a warranty for unsafe overclocking would be like providing insurance coverage for drunk driving.


I agree with the basis of that, and "safe overclocking" is hard to define, BUT even RAM OC'ing voids the stock warranty. Hell, using a non-stock cooler does too.

The stock warranty is VERY restrictive for overclockers. But back to the question that started this thread, they apparently don't test the CPU's that are RMA'd anyway, so it all up to the individual to be truthful or not when asked certain questions. That's easy enough, but it shouldn't even need to be a "thing".
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 7:34:09 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
I agree with the basis of that, and "safe overclocking" is hard to define, BUT even RAM OC'ing voids the stock warranty. Hell, using a non-stock cooler does too.

The stock warranty is VERY restrictive for overclockers. But back to the question that started this thread, they apparently don't test the CPU's that are RMA'd anyway, so it all up to the individual to be truthful or not when asked certain questions. That's easy enough, but it shouldn't even need to be a "thing".


There was a report from an Intel CS rep that said they just look for signs of damage to the CPU which are indicative of the excessive currents/thermals that would cause CPU failure. Basically they look for burn and heat marks on the package. According to the rep, overclocking and overvolting (including 1.65v SDRAM) was not immediate grounds for voiding the factory warranty but operation could not be guaranteed. I know that there were a few reports of 1.65v RAM killing Sandybridge CPUs but I believe that this turned out to be a result of faulty sockets manufactured at Foxconn.

The absolute maximum DC specifications are quite high and are more than enough for even most extreme overclockers. So long as reasonable care is taken damage should not be incurred and naturally damage caused by stupidity should not be covered.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 7:39:34 PM

Pinhedd said:
I know that there were a few reports of 1.65v RAM killing Sandybridge CPUs but I believe that this turned out to be a result of faulty sockets manufactured at Foxconn.


There's at least one person on these forums (Jaquith) that would argue that 1.65V RAM should NEVER be used with SB CPU's, although that has more to do with the VCCIO voltage required for such modules more than the RAM voltage itself. I tend to trust him.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 13, 2012 8:06:45 PM

Pinhedd said:
There was a report from an Intel CS rep that said they just look for signs of damage to the CPU which are indicative of the excessive currents/thermals that would cause CPU failure. Basically they look for burn and heat marks on the package.

I think the OP basically confirmed this above, when he was talking to the service rep.
Quote:
beside the troubleshooting steps and / or information you provided to the technical agents, our Warranty Return Center only validate the markings on the unit when it is received. We do not perform any test of the faulty units.

That said, I think the k-series CPUs should have a warranty separate from the locked proc warranties. I don't think it necessarily needs to be anything drastic, but something that would encourage the purchase of them over locked CPUs. Perhaps extending the boundaries of the warranty to some Intel-determined 'safe' voltage limits, as well as other defining other 'safe' protocols (allowing the usage of aftermarket coolers, etc).

But business is business, and I guess enthusiasts will buy the CPUs either way it goes.
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 13, 2012 8:28:46 PM

mousseng said:
I think the OP basically confirmed this above, when he was talking to the service rep.
Quote:
beside the troubleshooting steps and / or information you provided to the technical agents, our Warranty Return Center only validate the markings on the unit when it is received. We do not perform any test of the faulty units.

That said, I think the k-series CPUs should have a warranty separate from the locked proc warranties. I don't think it necessarily needs to be anything drastic, but something that would encourage the purchase of them over locked CPUs. Perhaps extending the boundaries of the warranty to some Intel-determined 'safe' voltage limits, as well as other defining other 'safe' protocols (allowing the usage of aftermarket coolers, etc).

But business is business, and I guess enthusiasts will buy the CPUs either way it goes.


That was the whole point of my previous post. There are 'safe' voltage and thermal limits that are published in the processor family datasheet. The maximum safe core voltage for the second generation i3/5/7 processors is 1.4 volts. Operation above marketed specifications isn't guaranteed but the datasheet is pretty clear that long-term functionality at factory settings should be retained so long as operation does not exceed the absolute maximum values specified in the datasheet. Most people who fry their CPUs run them at absurdly high and unsafe voltages such as 1.5v
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2012 4:09:50 PM

That's probably why the VRMs are going on die for Haswell.
m
0
l
!