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Graphics Card Not Detected

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 25, 2012 3:59:57 AM

I just bout a used Geforce GTX 260 core 216 for my first home built computer. Before this, I was using just Intel's Sandy Bridge integrated graphics.

I downloaded the latest driver for the 260, but every time I try to install, it says no compatible graphics hardware is detected.

I uninstalled the existing Intel HD Graphics Driver (now all that is left is "Standard VGA Graphics Adapter"). No other display adapters appear.

The card is connected to the PSU and its fan is spinning.

I checked, and the card is seated properly in the correct PCI-E 16 slot.

Reset BIOS.

I checked to make sure my mobo was set to use the PCI-E graphics, not integrated.

Windows has been fully updated.

I witnessed the card being used just before I bought it, so it shouldn't be a bad card.

Any help would be appreciated.

System Specs:
i5-2500k
G.Skill Sniper 2x4GB
Asus Maximus IV Gene-Z
500W PSU
Windows 7 Home Premium

More about : graphics card detected

a b Î Nvidia
a c 109 U Graphics card
January 25, 2012 5:40:20 AM

In bios have you disabled igp? Also does your psu have enough amperage to power the 260?
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January 25, 2012 7:04:42 AM

What about your PSU specification?. Is it a standard make?. GTX 260 sucks more power than my current gen GTX 560, about 180W. You should use PSU atleast 550W above the minimum mark.

However it cannot be the reason for failure of detection. Try these tips.

1) Disconnect GPU from mobo.Connect monitor into onboard video port
2) Reset your BIOS through jumper. Turn On
3) Now Boot your computer with Internal memory mode,remove all drivers and disable the onboard GPU in device manager, restart
4) Now in BIOS,video configuration set as PCI-E External. save and turn-off
5) PLug the card, dont just screw it. Insert it such a way it seats well and the PCIe lock level locks the card. Make sure it is inserted fully.
6) Remove all other devices except your HDD, such as DVD or chassis fan, etc. Just to make sure the power is not an issue
7) Now connect your monitor to GPU port and turn on. First see if monitor goes to standby or not. If not, then it could be a dead GPU/connector issue.
8) Turn on PC and press Bios enter key such as F1 and check boot up screen comes up. Please dont boot to windows. If it fails in detection at Bios, no use in logging to windows. It has nothing to do with your GPU.

If these methods fail, you might need to swap another card into yours and then do similar testing. Post the results. Will see
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January 25, 2012 7:07:24 AM

Update: If your mobo is quite old for a year of period, then would advise you to clean the dust off the slots.
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January 25, 2012 2:43:41 PM

Will get started on all of this this afternoon.

FYI this is a new build, so everything except for the GPU is BRAND NEW.
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January 25, 2012 2:52:44 PM

Quick Question:

"3) Now Boot your computer with Internal memory mode,remove all drivers and disable the onboard GPU in device manager, restart"

How do I boot in "internal memory mode"?
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January 25, 2012 5:30:10 PM

xtcx said:
What about your PSU specification?. Is it a standard make?. GTX 260 sucks more power than my current gen GTX 560, about 180W. You should use PSU atleast 550W above the minimum mark.

However it cannot be the reason for failure of detection. Try these tips.

1) Disconnect GPU from mobo.Connect monitor into onboard video port
2) Reset your BIOS through jumper. Turn On
3) Now Boot your computer with Internal memory mode,remove all drivers and disable the onboard GPU in device manager, restart
4) Now in BIOS,video configuration set as PCI-E External. save and turn-off
5) PLug the card, dont just screw it. Insert it such a way it seats well and the PCIe lock level locks the card. Make sure it is inserted fully.
6) Remove all other devices except your HDD, such as DVD or chassis fan, etc. Just to make sure the power is not an issue
7) Now connect your monitor to GPU port and turn on. First see if monitor goes to standby or not. If not, then it could be a dead GPU/connector issue.
8) Turn on PC and press Bios enter key such as F1 and check boot up screen comes up. Please dont boot to windows. If it fails in detection at Bios, no use in logging to windows. It has nothing to do with your GPU.

If these methods fail, you might need to swap another card into yours and then do similar testing. Post the results. Will see


Ok so I tried all of these steps and no joy. It simply will not detect the video card. The card is getting powe. And as I said I saw the card in use before i bought it, and it worked fine. The mobo is brand new. Asus's visual BIOS ID set to pcie as the play graphics interface, the offer option was iGPU.

Any suggestions?
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January 25, 2012 10:12:52 PM

You haven't told us the PSU brand and model, but it does sound like a PSU problem. Either that or your mobo is a lemon and you have to RMA it.
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January 25, 2012 10:29:51 PM

hpdeskjet said:
You haven't told us the PSU brand and model, but it does sound like a PSU problem. Either that or your mobo is a lemon and you have to RMA it.


The PSU is a RaidMax RX-5005 500w.

The only other thing I can think of is that the video card has 2 x 6pin slots. I only have a single 6pin supply from the PSU. What I was told was that it only needs one 6pin connector, that I would only need the 2nd 6pin if I was planning to overclock.

Is this true? Or do I need to go buy some kind of adapter so I can get a 2nd 6pin connected to my graphics card?

Thanks.
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January 25, 2012 11:22:42 PM

If you only need one 6 pin connector, it should be fine then. However, if your PSU can't power it up fully, then you would probably run into something like what you are experiencing. Raidmax isn't that great of a PSU provider. Also, on newegg, it says that you need a minimum of a 500W PSU. You are just meeting requirements and seeing that it is a Raidmax PSU, I doubt it is providing 500W.

I would suggest just buying a new PSU. Try something from a reliable brand like this to be safe:

XFX Core Edition PRO650W (P1-650S-NLB9) 650W ATX12V 2.2 & ESP12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply $89.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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January 26, 2012 12:49:49 AM

But would the "just-barely-sufficient-psu" really cause my computer to not even recognize that there is a graphics card plugged into the mobo?
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January 26, 2012 1:00:52 AM

I've seen it before. Hard to say 100% not being in front of your computer but it really does sound like that.
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January 26, 2012 1:32:27 AM

You know, maybe the mobo has a defective PCIe slot or something. I know ASUS is top notch but sometimes you can get a lemon. Just throwing it out there.
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January 31, 2012 12:40:33 AM

Best answer selected by erasmus22.
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January 31, 2012 9:11:48 AM

erasmus22 said:
Quick Question:

"3) Now Boot your computer with Internal memory mode,remove all drivers and disable the onboard GPU in device manager, restart"

How do I boot in "internal memory mode"?


In Bios, the option is there to select onboard video with physical memory.

Also, did you try removing all power cables such as 26-pin that connects your mobo and all others connectors and try connecting?. Before you consider the PSU as the issue, try swapping with new or better branded PSU like hpdeskjet said. First of all a single 6-pin PCIe connector may not deliver more than 75W from my assumption. Your card should intake upto 180W at full load. Hence, definitely you might need to connect 2 6-pin cables I think. Why don't you give it a try?.

A mobo cannot go faulty just like that....Don't worry
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January 31, 2012 12:05:05 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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