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Can this computer run world of warcraft Cataclysm DLC?

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July 17, 2012 10:02:20 PM

I was wondering if this PC can run the newest DLC for world of warcraft, on ultra settings pretty smoothly. If not please give me some other desktops to check out. I'd rather not build a pc because you don't get warranties.

Processor & Memory:
Intel® Core™ i5-2320 Processor 3GHz
12GB DDR3 - 1600MHz SDRAM
Drives:

2TB (7200 RPM) SATA Hard Drive + 500GB HDD Portable Storage with Universal Storage Module
DVD±RW Drive
Graphics & Video:

1GB NVIDIA GeForce GT620 HD Graphics

Windows 7

Lenovo IdeaCentre Desktop computer.
a c 190 à CPUs
July 17, 2012 10:16:44 PM

Kl129 said:
I'd rather not build a pc because you don't get warranties.


With a new OEM compuer you will get a 3 years warranty or less. With a new boxed (Retail) motherboards, CPU, or SSD from Intel® you are going to get a 3 year or more warranty. Quality Power Supplies give 3 or more years in warranty and even cases can come with warranties that are over a year. If you are uncomfortable in building a system that is fine but if it is a question of the warranty there is no reason to worry about that unless you buy some really low end stuff.
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a b à CPUs
July 17, 2012 10:24:09 PM

That setup is not for extreme gaming. That video card is valued at $60. It will most likely play wow on low settings at best
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July 17, 2012 10:25:39 PM

i run wow on ultra with a 6950 2gb and in a 25 man raid i can see some bad lag. i would upgrade the gpu
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a c 150 à CPUs
July 17, 2012 10:29:52 PM

the gpu is weak, it will play but on lowered detail and not great frame rates.

imo, you'e better off saving the dollars spent on that card and just using the onboard gpu and saving up for a better gpu
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July 17, 2012 11:22:02 PM

Better GPU=Better PSU as well. So your costs are going to go up with a prebuilt. It would take you $200-250 to get a decent graphics card and PSU to power it on your oem.
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a c 283 à CPUs
July 17, 2012 11:29:07 PM

The moral to this story is just build your own. There's really NO reason to buy pre-built OEM anymore for gamers. They'll "do" for people that just want a computer, but for gaming, building your own is the only way to go. Just my opinion, of course, but I know that most will agree.
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July 17, 2012 11:40:03 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
With a new OEM compuer you will get a 3 years warranty or less. With a new boxed (Retail) motherboards, CPU, or SSD from Intel® you are going to get a 3 year or more warranty. Quality Power Supplies give 3 or more years in warranty and even cases can come with warranties that are over a year. If you are uncomfortable in building a system that is fine but if it is a question of the warranty there is no reason to worry about that unless you buy some really low end stuff.


Actually, I was talking to an IT co-worker and he was telling me that Newegg.com (where I was planning on buying my parts) said that they only give 2 week warranties. And if something happens to one part, you have to go to that parts manufacturer and it's just a pain...
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a c 283 à CPUs
July 17, 2012 11:49:03 PM

Kl129 said:
Actually, I was talking to an IT co-worker and he was telling me that Newegg.com (where I was planning on buying my parts) said that they only give 2 week warranties. And if something happens to one part, you have to go to that parts manufacturer and it's just a pain...


30 days, and that's true, but the warranties still exist. And for each part, sometimes more than 3 years. You can't really beat that.

Besides that, the likelihood that you'll actually NEED the warranty is very small, statistically. It's really not something that you should be worrying about.
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July 18, 2012 12:14:50 AM

That's the only caveat with computer building, you have to go through your individual parts warranty and learn how to troubleshoot on the fly. You could always buy a prebuilt computer from cyberpowerpc or ibuypower but you're going to pay a premium.

OEM out of the box just won't run what you want on max. If your idea of warranty is you going to the store and exchanging past 30 days you will be paying an extended warranty plan. I'm also not quite sure an OEM computer warranty is upheld if they find you put a new GPU on your mobo which fried your PSU and system.
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August 30, 2012 11:01:15 PM

Wow is very heavy GPU and CPU game.

I run with dual 6950 2gb each and a high end AMD cpu. It runs good but i can get a spike when a 25+ man is going on.

when you turn the setting up on wow its game that is hard a computer.
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August 31, 2012 3:29:27 AM

Yes. That computer can play World of Warcraft. How well can it play WoW? That is a different story.. and with the release of MoP they are boosting the in-game graphics. Yes, you will be able to play WoW on Medium to Low settings.
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a b à CPUs
August 31, 2012 12:07:54 PM

Warranties through each manufacturer differs with ease of doing it. However, I have dealt with Corsair, Thermaltake, Western Digital, and on a pre-built side - Dell. Working with the former was easy as heck, hasslefree, and simply involved going to their website and submitting a ticket, printing the postage, packaging, and shipping. With Dell, it involved telephone calls, e-mail, and numerous hassles.

Also, warranties with a pre-built are often limited to 1 year unless you pay a hell of a premium (several hundred dollars) to extend it beyond that.

Honestly, pre-built is the way to go if warranty is the only issue.
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