Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Someone dumb down the Intel line up for this disgrunted AMD Fanboy.

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Intel
  • AMD
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
Share
July 18, 2012 4:16:35 PM

As the title state my last 3 builds have all been AMD and I have been rather happy with them. My last being a Phenom dual unlocked over clock and running happily for a 1.5 year at 3.4Ghz.

Anyway I always wanted to do more an all out rig (with in reason). Maybe more price to performance all out rig and I was looking forward to Bulldozer coming out......and well yeah that series seems to be a steaming pile.

I am not going to bother "upgrading" from my Phenom if I have to overclock the Bulldozer all to hell to see any increase.



I started shopping around and reading on here for Intel....well intel and I am a little confused.

Intel seems to have a processor every .1GHZ for like 10 dollars difference. Then overlaps it all with Snady bridge, Ivy Bridge, I3, I5, I7, and K or non-K.


Remember I used AMD Intel crowd if you want a convert you are going to have to use small word and type slowly.

From what I gather
I3 good
I5 better
I7 best
but I don't know why.

K or non K is the core unlock so I want the K processors if I am going to play.

Sandy bridge:A generation older but better cooling allowing higher % overclocks.
Ivy bridge:the latest greatest with flawed chip design that limits the thermal overhead on the series.


Anything I am missing..... I am leaning towards the I5 2500K on Tom's Recommendation but I wouldn't mind some feed back since I don't know jack about Intel.

More about : dumb intel line disgrunted amd fanboy

a b à CPUs
July 18, 2012 4:37:13 PM

For gaming either the 2500k or 3570k. From what I've seen the 3570k sometimes is able to achieve a lower OC then the 2500k but is still faster. Might as well the newest chip so you can get a board with the latest chipset too. Another consideration you might wanna make is if you wanna get the i7 version instead of the i5. i7 has hyperthreading making video transcoding/editing quicker, and other CPU demanding tasks. If all you do is game then i5 will be more then enough for you.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b à CPUs
July 18, 2012 5:10:43 PM

ccovemaker said:
Remember I used AMD Intel crowd if you want a convert you are going to have to use small word and type slowly.

From what I gather
I3 good
I5 better
I7 best
but I don't know why.


i3 is generally 2c/4t on desktop, and there is no version with an unlocked multiplier.

i5 is 4c/4t on desktop, and ideal for gaming because most games will not use more than 4 threads.

i7 is 4c/8t on desktop, and has the best overall performance with 8 threads. Software has evolved such that hyperthreading will not hurt performance in almost all cases, so you don't have to worry about that.

ccovemaker said:
K or non K is the core unlock so I want the K processors if I am going to play.


Yes, K SKUs have unlocked multipliers and can be overclocked easily. Keep in mind non-K SKUs include certain features such as VT-d (Virtualization Technology). But you probably want the K version if you are just gaming.

ccovemaker said:
Sandy bridge:A generation older but better cooling allowing higher % overclocks.
Ivy bridge:the latest greatest with flawed chip design that limits the thermal overhead on the series.


Anything I am missing..... I am leaning towards the I5 2500K on Tom's Recommendation but I wouldn't mind some feed back since I don't know jack about Intel.


This is incorrect. Ivy Bridge is not flawed. The desktop SKUs are rated at a ~20% lower thermal design point, but because the die is much smaller that Sandy Bridge it's harder to cool. So even though the chip is hotter, it's generating less heat. For the most part they will overclock just as well as Sandy Bridge, but at a higher temperature (Well within the operating range).
Share
July 18, 2012 5:23:58 PM

Oh yeah the focus is mostly gaming. WoW, Tera, Skyrim, BF3.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 18, 2012 5:26:22 PM

Then definitely stick with the i5-3570k
m
0
l
July 18, 2012 5:31:05 PM

3570k, 4.2 on stock heat sink, fast as hell.
m
0
l
a c 190 à CPUs
a b å Intel
July 18, 2012 5:37:20 PM

Here is something I wrote for another site for the 2nd generation but still works for the 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors. The original is at http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/806272.aspx

When you are looking at 2nd generation Intel® Core™ processors it is sometimes hard to understand the differences from one to the other. With the Intel Celeron® Desktop Processor, Intel Pentium® Desktop processor, Intel Core i3’s, Intel Core i5’s and the Intel Core i7’s processors there are generally simple differences between each processor’s family. While there may be some exceptions to rules, this should give you a basic understanding for our processors.

2nd generation Intel Core Processor Family

Intel Celeron Desktop Processors Outside of the Intel Atom™ processor, these are going to be our entry level basic processor. These processors are designed to fit the basic needs of a person or a company that will be doing little more than Internet, email and basic office applications.

· Dual core processors with the lowest clock speed and the smallest cache¹.

· Intel HD graphics that perform close to the level of the Intel HD 2000 Graphics but lack some of the key features².

¹Cache is a small amount of memory housed with the processor that helps it to quickly access frequently used information.

²See below: Intel Core i3 Processors, improved graphics Intel HD 2000.

Intel Pentium Desktop Processors are a step above the Intel Celerons in that they have a faster clock speed and 1MB of additional cache.

· Dual core processor with 3MB of cache.

· Intel HD graphics that perform close to the level of the Intel HD 2000 Graphics but lack some of the key features¹.

¹See below: Intel Core i3 Processors, improved graphics Intel HD 2000.



Intel Core i3 Processors are dual core processors, and the entry level into the “I” series family. They are generally faster than the Intel Pentium Desktop processors, and offer budget-oriented performance and power efficiency.

· Intel Hyper-threading technology allows you to run an additional thread¹ on each core. That means that these processors can handle up to 4 threads at once.

· Improved graphics in the Intel HD 2000 Graphics that offer features like Intel Quick Sync, Intel InTru™ 3D, Intel Insider™, and Intel Clear Video HD Technology

¹A “thread” represents a single running process, or program.

Intel Core i5 processors are quad core processors (The Intel Core i5-2390t is a dual core processor with hyper-threading). Having 4 full cores gives the Intel Core i5 processors good multi-tasking ability. Good for general multi-media work and gaming.

· Intel Turbo Boost Technology will intelligently clock the processor to a high clock speed based on the number of cores in use and temperature of the processor. This technology can produce up to 400MHz faster clock speeds.

· These processors have 6MB of cache.



Intel Core i7 processors are designed to fit the needs of the demanding power-users. These processors are quad or hex core processors that also have hyper-threading. For heavy multi-threading or multi-tasking these are the processors of choice for power-users.

· Intel Turbo Boost Technology

· Hyper-threading giving 4 core/8 threads support or 6 core/12 thread support.

· These processors have 8MB or more of cache.



Processor Extensions

Now there are a number of letters that are on the end of the desktop processor model #s that will help find the right processor for the job. These letters are X, K, S, T and P (I.E. Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition, Intel Core i5-2500K, Intel Core i5-2500S, Intel Core i5-2500T or Intel Core i5-2450P).

· “X” processors are our Extreme Edition processors these are the fastest and most robust top of the line processors in our lineup. They are unlocked and able to be overclocked to even higher clock speeds. (Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition)

· “K” processors are unlocked processors that will allow you to change a number of the settings from the multiplier¹, to the clock speed on the IGP (Integrated Graphics on Processor) if it has one. (Intel Core i5-2500K)

· “S” processors are designed to provide the performance that you would expect from a normal processor in that family but with power saving features. So for a business that has a large number of computers these processors can save a good deal off the power bill. (Intel Core i5-2500S)

· “T” processors are designed for thin/small form factor chassis. HTPC (Home Theater PC) or Mini-ITX computers where air flow and heat are important these processors run cooler with less power drain than the S processors and come with a special low profile HSF (heatsink/fan). (Intel Core i5-2500T)

· “P” processors are processors that have been released from Intel with the IGP disabled. Since they don’t have an IGP the consumer will need to have a video card when they use one of these processors. (Intel Core i5-2450P).

¹The basic external clock speed of a processor, times it’s multiplier, is what determines the measured clock speed of a processor. So an external clock of 133mhz multiplied by a x10 multiplier makes a clock speed of 1.33ghz.



Also important, you will want to know how to identify 1st generation Core I processors vs. our newer 2nd generation. One easy clue is the number of digits in the model number. 1st generation processors have 3 digits. For example, the Core I3 530 is from the previous generation, whereas the Core I3 2100, with a 4 digit model number, is of the 2nd generation.

One last thing that can help you identify 2nd generation Intel Core processors is if the model # of the processor has a “5” on the end (I.E. Intel Core i3-2105) the processor will come with the improved Intel HD 3000 Graphics.

For a list of all of our processors, as well as many other Intel products, including specifications and order codes, please visit ARK | Your source for information on Intel® products.

m
0
l
July 28, 2012 2:25:48 AM

Best answer selected by ccovemaker.
m
0
l
!