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No POST Issue - (Read all the NO POST Threads, nothing similar)

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April 7, 2012 4:34:59 AM

Hi Everyone!

I've joined this forum to ask for all your expertise regarding the matter.

I'm a first time custom pc builder. Here are my pc specs:

Motherboard - Intel DP67BG (B3) / The box shows a DP67BG Label, but a smaller sticker label with a B3 attached at the end.
Processor - Intel Core I7 2700K
RAM - 2 x 4 DDR3 1600MHz Corsair Vengeance
GPU - Gigabyte Nvidia Geforce gtx 560 ti
PSU - Corsair TX 650 V2
HDD - Seagate 1TB 7200rpm
Optical Drive - Buffalo DVD Drive
Case - Antec 300


I've read my users manual, attached the components accordingly but got a No POST Screen. I've already read all the threads regarding the No POST Screen, but nothing seems to similar to my problem.

When I turned on the power supply, everything inside turns on; the fans rotate, the power and reset button is on, a small led (yellow) near the 24 pin is on. But the thing is, there are no beeps to be heard. The motherboard has a built in speaker so I don't need to attach a speaker to hear any beeps.

I tried troubleshooting by breadboarding. I attached only the processor, cpu fan, psu and turned it on. Everything inside turned on, the cpu fans rotate, the power and reset button lights up, as well as the led near the 24 pin. But the thing is, there should be beeps that indicates the absence of the memory and gpu, but there is none.

Can I deduce the problem to the motherboard? Or is there anything that I can try to know that the problem lies with the other components like the memory or the GPU?

Any input would be appreciated. Thanks for all your time reading my post.

My best regards to everyone.

Best solution

a c 122 B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 11:59:20 AM

brix009 said:

I tried troubleshooting by breadboarding. I attached only the processor, cpu fan, psu and turned it on. Everything inside turned on, the cpu fans rotate, the power and reset button lights up, as well as the led near the 24 pin. But the thing is, there should be beeps that indicates the absence of the memory and gpu, but there is none.

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

Green wire should always be 5 volts, dropping to 0 only when the case power switch is pressed.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.
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April 17, 2012 1:02:15 AM

Best answer selected by brix009.
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April 17, 2012 1:04:35 AM

Sorry for the late reply.

Thank you very much JSC for the reply. I tried everything that you have suggested and PSU is in perfect condition.

I have read in different forums and threads that there are particular PSUs that are not compatible with the Intel Motherboard.

I bought a different PSU and it works without any problems with the motherboard.

Thank you very much everyone!
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