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Why Won't it work.

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April 7, 2012 5:52:50 AM

Hello all. So I've been working on this brand new computer (which I built) for about two weeks know and I'm just about ready to throw it out my window. So originally I bought all the necessary components (I'll list them at the bottom) for a working computer, put it together, and turned it on. It seemed to be working, but it was lagging really bad. I ran tests on every from the RAM with Memtest86, CPU with CPU Tester Pro, and the hard drive with both windows checker and the manufacturers hard drive testing thing. These took several hours. All tests passed, so I concluded it was the motherboard. I sent the motherboard back to Newegg, and they confirmed it was faulty, so they sent me a new one. After installing the new motherboard (I had already installed all the drivers on the hard drive) everything seemed to be working properly. I installed a game on it (this is a gaming computer) then, I left to get a sandwich, and came back to find "Disk error" covering my screen, and it wanted me to choose a new boot device. So I reset it, and went on praying it was a one time thing (highly unlikely) and played my game. It was working, then suddenly bam, it randomly shuts off and "windows tries to find the problem." Then, a couple of minutes later as I'm sitting there "windows encountered a threatening problem and shut down". thats all i could read before the screen went black. I am currently re-running memtest but i have a feeling nothing will be wrong. Here are my specs: I have a AMD Athlon tri-core 3.3Ghz processor, an ASUS M5A97 motherboard, an HD 6770 video card (ASUS), RX-530SS ATX power supply, a 400GB Caviar Hard drive, and 8Gb of RAM at 1333Mhz. Also something which may or may not be important to note is that the wifi card I have installed fluctuates from being connected with limited access to just not working. That could just be the wifi card tough. All the parts are new except for the hard drive, and like I said it checked out in the tests, but I'm going to run them again. Any idea what I can do? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks

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a b B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 6:05:20 AM

boot disc error is your HD. could be loose wires, bad wires, need to plug wires into different SATA connectors on board. may need to do a scan disc and recovery on hard drive. HD may be shot. that's it.

i would also get that funky bit of hardware out of my case while i tried to fix problem ( wifi )

also disable floppy drive / also under boot sequence.
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April 7, 2012 6:12:18 AM

Remove your wifi card and try using your computer and monitor it for while.May be wifi card will be your problem.
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Related resources
April 7, 2012 7:45:51 AM

But would the Wifi card cause both a disk error and a windows problem? If I have to plug the HD into a new SATA port doesn't that mean my motherboard is malfunctioning?
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April 7, 2012 7:50:04 AM

swifty_morgan said:
boot disc error is your HD. could be loose wires, bad wires, need to plug wires into different SATA connectors on board. may need to do a scan disc and recovery on hard drive. HD may be shot. that's it.

i would also get that funky bit of hardware out of my case while i tried to fix problem ( wifi )

also disable floppy drive / also under boot sequence.


Well, I ran the tests and the Hard drive passed both of them. One thing I did notice was that at some points it would stop testing the hard drive, then 20-30 seconds later it would continue. Is the Hard drive the only thing that can cause both a disk error and a windows failure? Could it be the actual operating system itself? Would writing 0's to the hard drive and re-installing everything possibly help? Thanks!
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April 7, 2012 7:50:05 AM

Some times a component can cause trouble at any component directly or indirectly they all are related to each for functioning.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 9:44:45 AM

Although what you have does not sound like a power problem, Raidmax PSU's are not particularly good power supplies.

Check this:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...
to make sure that you didn't overlook something simple.

Then work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If that doesn't work:
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The green wire should be 5 volts dropping to zero only when the case power is pressed.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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a c 136 B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 10:41:33 AM

So where did you get the operating system for this computer ?
And what is it?

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April 7, 2012 6:54:38 PM

My dad bought Windows 7 Ultimate from Pakistan so I guess it could be the problem. I also downloaded a version from piratebay which is the one I am currently running, I wasn't sure what bit the pakistan version was on so I downloaded the 64 bit for my system. Currently, everything seems to be working fine, the hard drive checked out in the tests, the RAM still had no errors after 11 passes, and the CPU seems good to go as does the Video card. The only thing I can't figure out is why my wifi card wont work. Its a brand new ROSEWILL| RNX-N250PCE R adapter and it plugs in to my motherboard with the antenna coming out of the back. Sometimes it can find the network but when it does I have limited access. Other times it just can't find it, and sometimes it tells me "Windows can't connect to the hidden network." I have a Netgear N Router upstairs, and I know I have a good signal because my much less advanced laptop router can find it easily anywhere. Any idea whats up?
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April 7, 2012 7:00:52 PM

jsc said:
Although what you have does not sound like a power problem, Raidmax PSU's are not particularly good power supplies.

Check this:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...
to make sure that you didn't overlook something simple.

Then work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If that doesn't work:
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The green wire should be 5 volts dropping to zero only when the case power is pressed.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.


My motherboard actually came with the newest UFEBIOS or whatever, and just by accessing that I can see all the power wattage for each rail in real time. Even with 4 case fans running everything seems to get the exact amount of power it needs to, my 12V rails are at 12.2, my processor gets 1.4 and it needs 1.3, and my 5V are at around 4.9 or 5.1. I also have some software that came with my Video card called Smart Doctor. It's constantly running and it tells me when my video card is functioning normally, such as temperature spikes and what not. The other thing is my system doesn't beep at all, which may mean that i plugged in my case speaker to the wrong port....will check. I do have speakers plugged into the back which do work, but still no beeps. Finally, my motherboard doesn't have an onboard video so that shouldn't be a problem. Its just the sketchy Wifi card which wont work, which i first thought was a Driver error but I installed them 3 times to no avail. Then I thought it was data transfer error i.e. the motherboard, RAM, Hard drive, or processor, but like I said everything checked out, so it must be the cardright ?Unless the motherboard is bad again....
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a b B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 8:07:45 PM

hassan95 said:
My dad bought Windows 7 Ultimate from Pakistan so I guess it could be the problem. I also downloaded a version from piratebay which is the one I am currently running, I wasn't sure what bit the pakistan version was on so I downloaded the 64 bit for my system. Currently, everything seems to be working fine, the hard drive checked out in the tests, the RAM still had no errors after 11 passes, and the CPU seems good to go as does the Video card. The only thing I can't figure out is why my wifi card wont work. Its a brand new ROSEWILL| RNX-N250PCE R adapter and it plugs in to my motherboard with the antenna coming out of the back. Sometimes it can find the network but when it does I have limited access. Other times it just can't find it, and sometimes it tells me "Windows can't connect to the hidden network." I have a Netgear N Router upstairs, and I know I have a good signal because my much less advanced laptop router can find it easily anywhere. Any idea whats up?



Holy crap. We do not support using illegal or pirated software in any way, shape or form. People can be so insanely stupid. Go buy a legal versions of Windows and then come back here for help if you are still having a problem, until you decide to do the right thing and use legal software,

hasta la vista baby!
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April 7, 2012 8:43:59 PM

Okay okay, calm down. I re-installed the version my dad bought from Pakistan, and yes, it is a legal version. Better?
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a c 136 B Homebuilt system
April 7, 2012 9:11:55 PM

hassan95 said:
My dad bought Windows 7 Ultimate from Pakistan so I guess it could be the problem. I also downloaded a version from piratebay which is the one I am currently running, I wasn't sure what bit the pakistan version was on so I downloaded the 64 bit for my system. Currently, everything seems to be working fine, the hard drive checked out in the tests, the RAM still had no errors after 11 passes, and the CPU seems good to go as does the Video card. The only thing I can't figure out is why my wifi card wont work. Its a brand new ROSEWILL| RNX-N250PCE R adapter and it plugs in to my motherboard with the antenna coming out of the back. Sometimes it can find the network but when it does I have limited access. Other times it just can't find it, and sometimes it tells me "Windows can't connect to the hidden network." I have a Netgear N Router upstairs, and I know I have a good signal because my much less advanced laptop router can find it easily anywhere. Any idea whats up?


Download a copy of Ubuntu linux . The 64 bit version

Use it topartition and format the hard drive . Make sure it merges all existing partitions
Also make sure you have saved any data files you want because that process will kill them stone cold dead .

Then see if it runs with Ubuntu .
I suspect the problems you are having are software related . The linux install will indicate if that is correct , and if it is then BUY a legit version of Win 7 Premium 64 bit
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April 8, 2012 3:41:29 AM

Outlander_04 said:
Download a copy of Ubuntu linux . The 64 bit version

Use it topartition and format the hard drive . Make sure it merges all existing partitions
Also make sure you have saved any data files you want because that process will kill them stone cold dead .

Then see if it runs with Ubuntu .
I suspect the problems you are having are software related . The linux install will indicate if that is correct , and if it is then BUY a legit version of Win 7 Premium 64 bit


Before I do this I want to make sure its not an actual component, and currently I am running the Western Degital Data LifeGuard Diagnostic and I noted that the test pauses for a period of time, and then continues. Is this a motherboard or hard drive problem? Or is it still software?

Also, when I leave my system running and come back in an hour or two the screen reads disc error and it tells me to select a proper boot device. Now when I'm running the computer or playing a game, it seems to work fine, except it froze once. When I restart and select the hard drive again it boots fine, but how can it switch the boot device to disc when there is no disc inserted and the system is already running, as in on the windows home screen?
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a b B Homebuilt system
April 8, 2012 7:44:15 PM

look in the BIOS for boot sequence. make the HD first, dvd second and disable floppy if you don't have one. Also disable floppy somewhere under the part of the BIOS where you set the date/time. save/reboot.
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April 8, 2012 7:53:38 PM

swifty_morgan said:
look in the BIOS for boot sequence. make the HD first, dvd second and disable floppy if you don't have one. Also disable floppy somewhere under the part of the BIOS where you set the date/time. save/reboot.


Yeah, I made the HD first like 6 times but it keeps reverting to DVD for some reason. I think it may just be a hard drive problem.
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a b B Homebuilt system
April 9, 2012 4:03:39 AM

or you didn't save it/F10 then enter.
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April 19, 2012 2:03:56 AM

It was the hard drive, I replaced it with a Caviar Green and now it works great. thanks for all your help!
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!