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Can a processor that is not listed still work?

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July 20, 2012 5:15:20 PM

If a processor is not listed in the motherboard support list is there a possibility that it may still work? The socket and fsb are both compatible. LGA775, 1066mhz

More about : processor listed work

July 20, 2012 5:22:45 PM

give us the exact motherboard and cpu model numbers posting links will help as well
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July 20, 2012 6:20:59 PM

it probably would work
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July 20, 2012 6:23:32 PM

Sometimes you will find info here that the manufacturer does not have listed and by chip set as well http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/
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July 20, 2012 7:30:00 PM

Gigabye GA-8N-SLI

Pentium dual core e6600 or e5700
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July 20, 2012 9:05:23 PM

There are several versions of LGA775, and I think it was just Intel forcing people to buy new boards to use their new chips. Anyway the initial nForce chipset was only designed for P4 LGA 775 CPUs, so there are probably very few boards, if any, that would work with the slightly different pin usage of Core 2s over P4s
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July 20, 2012 9:20:38 PM

hmmm ... okay i guess i would have to buy a new board and processor. I think i will go with amd
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July 20, 2012 10:35:53 PM

In general yes there is always a possibilty but for your exact case no because the Intel chipset doesn't support that CPU.
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July 20, 2012 10:38:05 PM

rds1220 said:
In general yes there is always a possibilty but for your exact case no because the AMD chipset doesn't support that CPU.

Nforc4 for Intel in the beginning of LGA775!
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July 20, 2012 10:40:46 PM

rolli59 said:
Nforc4 for Intel in the beginning of LGA775!


Oops meant Intel. I was writing an email to someone about an AMD computer they were having a problem with.
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July 20, 2012 10:56:05 PM

The nforce4 appeared in three or four models during the p4 era and the begging of the core2 era. I had one such board, even without the bios support it ran a e6400 just fine but overclocking and life of the board was still very poor much like the other boards of the era even for the p4 it still sucked. The chipsets from that time are scotching hot and barely run at any speed of 300mhz. 110nm fabrication meant that they were also large besides being hot. You would be lucky to get core2 support and even more lucky if it lasted any longer than it has. The power vrm designs on these boards and for the most part on almost all boards going back to the late 90s were very subpar with few exceptions.

I would just ditch it and upgrade the cpu and board.

Notice that this board is from the same era as the video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeFyUiV6gxI
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July 20, 2012 11:54:20 PM

so the processor may work.. but it would not be wise to do any overclocking ? I think i will try out the e5700 and if it don't work then i'll go with new processor and board
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July 21, 2012 12:00:27 AM

No it probably won't work because the chipset is not compatible with that CPU.
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July 21, 2012 12:15:23 AM

I would simply go with a new build. You may or may not be wasting money with the e5700. But if it is not officially listed as a supported CPU for your mobo, then most likely you will be wasting your money.

While AMD CPUs may be less expensive than Intel CPUs, they are also less powerful. This can mean that you would upgrade again sooner rather than later which means spending more money in the long run. AMD's FX series also tends to consume a lot of power compared to Intel's CPUs; about 60w - 80w more. An Intel Ivy Bridge CPU is roughly 30% more powerful on average than an AMD FX CPU assuming the same clock speed.

How much more money that will cost you on your electrical bill depends on your usage and how much you pay per KWH. If you play games 15 hours per week every week and pay $0.10 per KWH, that works out to a little over $6 per year or $0.50 per month. If you live in a city where electricity is expensive (like NYC), then double that. Small, but over time it could add up which can make up a good decent amount of the price difference between an AMD CPU and an Intel CPU.

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July 21, 2012 12:42:57 AM

okay.. yea AMD is cheaper.. I think i will go with it for a change..
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July 21, 2012 12:43:22 AM

The Conroe based core 2 duo may work even without there being proper bios support but not any of the 45nm based dual or quad core series. None of these nforce4 boards could be counted on as supporting any quad core. The boards them selves barely handled the netbust dual core cpus let alone handled the pentium 4 due to very poor power vrm design on many boards.

Certainly no overclocking if the condition of the board isn't known.
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July 21, 2012 12:50:30 AM

NavinPersad1 said:
okay.. yea AMD is cheaper.. I think i will go with it for a change..


What are you going to be doing with this computer?
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July 21, 2012 1:15:36 AM

well i just want to play some games ... like when i got nothing else to do.
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July 21, 2012 1:44:28 AM

Build your self an amd A8 system. It has the cpu and graphics all in just one chip and they offer pretty decent performance. Go for the A8 3870k as it is the best in that line and easier to work with.
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July 21, 2012 2:05:21 AM

I would do a cheap Intel board with a Pentium G or I3 and a middle of the road graphics card. I'm really not impressed with AMD's APU's and to me they are a waste. Sure they have better graphics than Intel but in terms of sheer prosessing power Intel wins out.
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July 21, 2012 2:17:58 AM

I would not go with the AMD Llano A8-3870k APU if you plan on upgrading the CPU (APU) in the future. The Llano APUs are socket FM1 and it is basically a dead socket. The Trinity APU is Llano successor which should be released this fall and it will be socket FM2.

The good thing about AMD's APUs is the integrated graphic core which are generally better than what Intel has to offer. The integrated graphic core in the Sandy Bridge CPUs is the Intel HD 3000; in Ivy Bridge CPUs it's the Intel HD 4000. In terms of performance, the Intel HD 3000 is basically equal to a desktop Radeon HD 5450 graphic card. The Intel HD 4000 is basically equal or slightly better than the desktop Radeon HD 5550 graphic card. The integrated graphic core in the Llano A8-3870k APU is a little more than halfway between a desktop Radeon HD 5550 and Radoen HD 5570 graphic card.

The Intel HD 4000 graphic core and the A8-3870k's graphic core are basically good enough to play games using medium quality at 1366x768 resolution. Anything higher than that then you need a dedicated graphic card.

The A8-3870k's graphic core can be used to Crossfire with up to a Radeon HD 6670 desktop graphic card. Combined the total graphic potential should be equivalent to a Radeon HD 6750 graphic card. Installing anything faster than the Radeon HD 6670 will automatically disable Crossfire; so installing a Radeon HD 6750 means it will perform as a Radeon HD 6750. The Intel HD 4000 does not combine with any AMD or nVidia graphic card to improve performance.

I do not recommend Llano APUs because:

1. Dead socket and slower CPU core compared to Phenom II and FX series.
2. Installing anything faster than a Radeon HD 6670 will automatically disable the integrated graphic core.
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July 21, 2012 2:35:42 AM

For gaming you would be better of getting to get a faster phenom II Black Edition with a dedicated video card and motherboard. APU's offer nothing more than onboard graphics pretty much they just moved the chip from the motherboard, to the CPU. Its a waste of money buying a CPU with integrated GPU when as a gamer you will most likely have a dedicated graphics card. Also crossfiring low end gpu's creates microstutter, and doesnt even give the performance of a good mid-range 6850. I would much rather have a good CPU and good dedicated GPU for what it would cost to get a crappy APU and a crappy low end crossfire setup.
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