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HELP! Did i fry my CPU?

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July 20, 2012 10:16:12 PM

Could i have fried my CPU while overclocking? i was trying to get a 4.2 overclock on my i7 2600k, with asrock extreme 3 gen 3 z68 mobo and noctua nh-d14 cooler.
I set vcore voltage to 1.25 and core multiplier to 42, the rest stock settings and when i booted up it froze at the windows loading screen. When i set everyone back to bios stock the same thing happens. I tried a system restore and nothing. I can load fine into bios but windows will not load. What should i do?

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a c 110 K Overclocking
July 20, 2012 10:33:14 PM

Nah, I doubt it's fried. It would take a lot more voltage than that to fry it almost instantly like that. Secondarily, IF it was fried, the system just wouldn't boot at all.

It sounds like something happened to the Windows installation, but you said you tried a system restore, so I'm not sure. Is it the system repair that you tried?

You may just need to do a complete reformat and reinstall if you can.
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July 20, 2012 10:45:42 PM

boot from your windows dvd and choose system recovery choose command prompt first and type:

chkdsk c: /f /x

to see what it can find first.

Then try startup repair to see if it can fix this problem.

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July 20, 2012 11:19:05 PM

You didn't say if you have cleared the CMOS memory, it is normal to have to do this after a failed overclocking attempt. If the computer can get into the BIOS it is unlikely that the processor is damaged.
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July 20, 2012 11:22:00 PM

No it is not fried, a dead cpu wouldn't allow the system to even post, it wouldn't allow the system speaker to work, no error code, no nothing just lights on and nothing. In fact a dead cpu wouldn't even need a cooler as they don't emit much heat. So your system is fine and your sample likely needed a little more voltage in order to remain stable.
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a c 124 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 20, 2012 11:40:30 PM

nforce4max said:
In fact a dead cpu wouldn't even need a cooler as they don't emit much heat.

That depends on what failed and how. If the failure causes a Vcccore-GND short, as much as 100A may flow through the bridge and surrounding metallization layers and melt or even vaporize (magic blue smoke) some of the core.
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July 20, 2012 11:45:24 PM

InvalidError said:
That depends on what failed and how. If the failure causes a Vcccore-GND short, as much as 100A may flow through the bridge and surrounding metallization layers and melt or even vaporize (magic blue smoke) some of the core.


That is true but I was speaking from the standpoint of after the failure has occurred. I have seen only a small few of actually dead cpus over the years but plenty of boards and power supplies.
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a c 124 à CPUs
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July 20, 2012 11:54:09 PM

nforce4max said:
I have seen only a small few of actually dead cpus over the years but plenty of boards and power supplies.

Since the days of integrated thermal management with the P4 and Athlon64, frying CPUs to catastrophic and spectacular self-destruction has become a much less common event.

This reminds me of THG's video many years ago about HSF-off testing the P3 vs P4 vs Athlon. P3 instantaneously crashed but lived to boot another day, P4 continued limping along with thermal throttling, Athlon spontaneously combusted.
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a c 283 à CPUs
a c 110 K Overclocking
July 20, 2012 11:57:02 PM

InvalidError said:
This reminds me of THG's video many years ago about HSF-off testing the P3 vs P4 vs Athlon. P3 instantaneously crashed but lived to boot another day, P4 continued limping along with thermal throttling, Athlon spontaneously combusted.


Which reminds me, I have an old Athlon like the one they used that I always wanted to try that with, but I never had the "stones" LOL. :lol: 
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July 21, 2012 12:00:45 AM

LoL, I salvaged one a few months ago that still works. Was o.O when I realized that it ran firefox slightly better than a e-350. They indeed do run pretty hot and suck close to 70w worth of power at stock clocks. Later socket a boards integrated better thermal management that shuts everything down before reaching high temp.
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July 22, 2012 5:23:34 PM

I mentioned this on the other post concerning this issue. Take out all your memory and try booting with just one stick of ram in. This sounds like a memory issue, so try this and see if that gets you in Windows. If it does then check each stick of memory separately. Also if this motherboard has 2 BIOS, you can always try setting the board to BIOS 2 and seeing if it boots into Windows.
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