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checking Xbox games for errors.

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Anonymous
April 29, 2005 8:56:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I still
have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called cd-
DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if there
are any unreadable or damaged sectors.

Anyone know if cd-dvdspeed can scan xbox DVD's too? or of something else I
can use?

cd-dvdspeed is at:
http://www.cdspeed2000.com/

More about : checking xbox games errors

Anonymous
April 29, 2005 8:56:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

hashi wrote:
> I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
still
> have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
cd-
> DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
there
> are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>
> Anyone know if cd-dvdspeed can scan xbox DVD's too? or of something
else I
> can use?
>
> cd-dvdspeed is at:
> http://www.cdspeed2000.com/

Go away pirate.
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 10:41:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Robert P Holley wrote:
> hashi wrote:
>
>>I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
>
> still
>
>>have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
>
> cd-
>
>>DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
>
> there
>
>>are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>>
>>Anyone know if cd-dvdspeed can scan xbox DVD's too? or of something
>
> else I
>
>>can use?
>>
>>cd-dvdspeed is at:
>>http://www.cdspeed2000.com/
>
>
> Go away pirate.

He might understand "shove off" better?
Related resources
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 11:31:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

On 29 Apr 2005 11:32:24 -0700, "Robert P Holley" <holleyrp@delanet.com>
wrote in message
<1114799544.693316.231710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>:

>hashi wrote:
>> I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
>still
>> have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
>cd-
>> DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
>there
>> are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>
>Go away pirate.

His concern seems reasonable. Being able to surface scan a used Xbox
disc for read errors due to physical damage is a completely separate
issue from being able pirate an Xbox game.

How is this an indication of piracy?
April 30, 2005 6:28:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Paul Angstrom wrote:
> On 29 Apr 2005 11:32:24 -0700, "Robert P Holley" <holleyrp@delanet.com>
> wrote in message
> <1114799544.693316.231710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>:
>
>
>>hashi wrote:
>>
>>>I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
>>
>>still
>>
>>>have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
>>
>>cd-
>>
>>>DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
>>
>>there
>>
>>>are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>>
>>Go away pirate.
>
>
> His concern seems reasonable. Being able to surface scan a used Xbox
> disc for read errors due to physical damage is a completely separate
> issue from being able pirate an Xbox game.
>
> How is this an indication of piracy?


You must forgive Robert. He has a bit of a compulsive twitch that lashes
out vocally at anything that might be slightly construed as modding or
the like. I too, thought was the hell does this Nero tool have to do
with anything “pirate” related. It’s merely a sort of benchmark tool for
various metrics/quality of an optical media.


Unrelated, I LOVE my MODDED box, there is no better, robust, or scalable
media player short of a HTPC! MOD MOD MOD MOD MOD LOL
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 11:57:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Paul Angstrom <angstrom@go.away.spammers.invalid> wrote:

> His concern seems reasonable. Being able to surface scan a used Xbox
> disc for read errors due to physical damage is a completely separate
> issue from being able pirate an Xbox game.

If there was physical damage to the disc, you'd be able to see it. So why
is there the need for a surface scan?

There is a possibility that the disc itself had a manufacturing error that
could render it unreadable, but then again, the stores I've bought used
discs from all had a guarantee that their discs were free from errors, or
they'd replace the game for you.

So why is a surface scan needed? Look at the disc when you buy the game
and make sure it has no obvious problems. Also, given that the discs are
scanned at the factory, the chances of you getting a bad disc are very
slim. So, again, why the need for a surface scan?

Given that you'd normally run a sufrace scan on discs you make yourself,
and that the OP said he wanted to ensure that the game was good before he
couldn't return it, it certainly sounds to me that he's interested in
buying games from the store, copying them, then returning them - therefore
getting a game for free.

Most places give you a 30 day window for returns, and even after that, the
manufacturer has a lifetime warranty on the disc - that they will replace
for you in the event of damage or loss. You simply have to pay postage.

Again, the chances of you getting a bad disc from a store are extremely
low. It would surprise me if it was as high as 1 in 10,000.
May 4, 2005 4:25:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Doug Jacobs wrote:
> Paul Angstrom <angstrom@go.away.spammers.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>His concern seems reasonable. Being able to surface scan a used Xbox
>>disc for read errors due to physical damage is a completely separate
>>issue from being able pirate an Xbox game.
>
>
> If there was physical damage to the disc, you'd be able to see it. So why
> is there the need for a surface scan?
>
> There is a possibility that the disc itself had a manufacturing error that
> could render it unreadable, but then again, the stores I've bought used
> discs from all had a guarantee that their discs were free from errors, or
> they'd replace the game for you.
>
> So why is a surface scan needed? Look at the disc when you buy the game
> and make sure it has no obvious problems. Also, given that the discs are
> scanned at the factory, the chances of you getting a bad disc are very
> slim. So, again, why the need for a surface scan?
>
> Given that you'd normally run a sufrace scan on discs you make yourself,
> and that the OP said he wanted to ensure that the game was good before he
> couldn't return it, it certainly sounds to me that he's interested in
> buying games from the store, copying them, then returning them - therefore
> getting a game for free.
>
> Most places give you a 30 day window for returns, and even after that, the
> manufacturer has a lifetime warranty on the disc - that they will replace
> for you in the event of damage or loss. You simply have to pay postage.
>
> Again, the chances of you getting a bad disc from a store are extremely
> low. It would surprise me if it was as high as 1 in 10,000.


Contrary to your reply to this fellow, I personally felt he was just
tinkering. Much the same as any optical media that is thoroughly
benchmarked with varios type of usage, and the material dye is measured
for quality.

If he wanted to copy a game, he would need a modded xbox to play it. If
he had a modded xbox, a rip would be as simple as two clicks; they're
generally isn't any protection on those disks other than the Fat-X file
system is unreadable by Windows. Likewise, to copy a game, it would seem
much easier to rent at blockbuster or family video and not go through
all the redundant hassle of scanning for errors.

You said 30 day window.For cash returns on open games?! Please let me
know the most places! It appears we must not have "most places" in the
midwest. Is that a new chain or something?
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 5:54:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

theOne wrote:
> Doug Jacobs wrote:
>
>> Paul Angstrom <angstrom@go.away.spammers.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> His concern seems reasonable. Being able to surface scan a used Xbox
>>> disc for read errors due to physical damage is a completely separate
>>> issue from being able pirate an Xbox game.
>>
>>
>>
>> If there was physical damage to the disc, you'd be able to see it. So
>> why is there the need for a surface scan?
>>
>> There is a possibility that the disc itself had a manufacturing error
>> that could render it unreadable, but then again, the stores I've
>> bought used discs from all had a guarantee that their discs were free
>> from errors, or they'd replace the game for you.
>>
>> So why is a surface scan needed? Look at the disc when you buy the
>> game and make sure it has no obvious problems. Also, given that the
>> discs are scanned at the factory, the chances of you getting a bad
>> disc are very slim. So, again, why the need for a surface scan?
>>
>> Given that you'd normally run a sufrace scan on discs you make
>> yourself, and that the OP said he wanted to ensure that the game was
>> good before he couldn't return it, it certainly sounds to me that he's
>> interested in buying games from the store, copying them, then
>> returning them - therefore getting a game for free.
>>
>> Most places give you a 30 day window for returns, and even after that,
>> the manufacturer has a lifetime warranty on the disc - that they will
>> replace for you in the event of damage or loss. You simply have to
>> pay postage.
>>
>> Again, the chances of you getting a bad disc from a store are
>> extremely low. It would surprise me if it was as high as 1 in 10,000.
>
>
>
> Contrary to your reply to this fellow, I personally felt he was just
> tinkering. Much the same as any optical media that is thoroughly
> benchmarked with varios type of usage, and the material dye is measured
> for quality.
>
> If he wanted to copy a game, he would need a modded xbox to play it. If
> he had a modded xbox, a rip would be as simple as two clicks; they're
> generally isn't any protection on those disks other than the Fat-X file
> system is unreadable by Windows. Likewise, to copy a game, it would seem
> much easier to rent at blockbuster or family video and not go through
> all the redundant hassle of scanning for errors.
>
> You said 30 day window.For cash returns on open games?! Please let me
> know the most places! It appears we must not have "most places" in the
> midwest. Is that a new chain or something?

Indeed. Any places that I've shopped have a policy of not allowing
returns on opened media exactly for the reason that it may be aiding a
copyright violator.
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 10:42:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Gamestop and other such stores sell used games with a 90 day return
policy as if the game was new. Hence, if the game does not play you can
bring it back and they exchange it. I never got a disc from a store
that was used and in bad condition, in fact, they usually look as if
they were new.

If you buy from eBay or another individual this may be an issue, but
then most individuals will sell "as-is" and I doubt someone on eBay
would give you an exchange.

hashi wrote:
> I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
still
> have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
cd-
> DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
there
> are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>
> Anyone know if cd-dvdspeed can scan xbox DVD's too? or of something
else I
> can use?
>
> cd-dvdspeed is at:
> http://www.cdspeed2000.com/
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 11:58:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:

> If he wanted to copy a game, he would need a modded xbox to play it. If
> he had a modded xbox, a rip would be as simple as two clicks; they're
> generally isn't any protection on those disks other than the Fat-X file
> system is unreadable by Windows. Likewise, to copy a game, it would seem
> much easier to rent at blockbuster or family video and not go through
> all the redundant hassle of scanning for errors.

Well, he also posted the same question to the PS2 group, so it looks a bit
more suspicious...

> You said 30 day window.For cash returns on open games?! Please let me
> know the most places! It appears we must not have "most places" in the
> midwest. Is that a new chain or something?

Frys is a local chain out in CA, and parts of the southwest. Their return
policies are very liberal, and as a result, most of the chain stores out
here will - reluctantly - make exceptions for you. Though it doesn't make
much sense to shop at the other chain stores since Frys tends to have the
best price (due to incompetance on their part) they price match, and don't
try to sell you an extended warranty on every piece of merchandise you
look at.

I do remember getting into a heated argument with a manager at Best Buy in
Michigan after he refused to give me a refund for a PC CDRom game that
wasn't working on my system (was incompatible with my graphics card) He
kept saying it was against company policy to take back opened PC software
due to concerns about viruses (technical knowledge apparentally is not an
employment requirement.) He eventually gave me store credit but it
certainly didn't do much to encourage me to keep shopping at Best Buy.
May 5, 2005 4:29:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Doug Jacobs wrote:
> theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:
>
>
>>If he wanted to copy a game, he would need a modded xbox to play it. If
>>he had a modded xbox, a rip would be as simple as two clicks; they're
>>generally isn't any protection on those disks other than the Fat-X file
>>system is unreadable by Windows. Likewise, to copy a game, it would seem
>>much easier to rent at blockbuster or family video and not go through
>>all the redundant hassle of scanning for errors.
>
>
> Well, he also posted the same question to the PS2 group, so it looks a bit
> more suspicious...
>
>
>>You said 30 day window.For cash returns on open games?! Please let me
>>know the most places! It appears we must not have "most places" in the
>>midwest. Is that a new chain or something?
>
>
> Frys is a local chain out in CA, and parts of the southwest. Their return
> policies are very liberal, and as a result, most of the chain stores out
> here will - reluctantly - make exceptions for you. Though it doesn't make
> much sense to shop at the other chain stores since Frys tends to have the
> best price (due to incompetance on their part) they price match, and don't
> try to sell you an extended warranty on every piece of merchandise you
> look at.

Clearly, if pirating was the game, one wouldn't go through all that
hassle and merely rent a game or download it. Don't you think?
>
> I do remember getting into a heated argument with a manager at Best Buy in
> Michigan after he refused to give me a refund for a PC CDRom game that
> wasn't working on my system (was incompatible with my graphics card) He
> kept saying it was against company policy to take back opened PC software
> due to concerns about viruses (technical knowledge apparentally is not an
> employment requirement.) He eventually gave me store credit but it
> certainly didn't do much to encourage me to keep shopping at Best Buy.
>
If I owned a store like that, I wouldn't "refund" any opened media
either. That's like opening the door to jackasses copying
software/games, getting legit keys, and than returnin the stuff at no
cost to them. A replacement is a different story. Can you really blame 'em?
May 5, 2005 4:30:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Christian Winter wrote:
> Gamestop and other such stores sell used games with a 90 day return
> policy as if the game was new. Hence, if the game does not play you can
> bring it back and they exchange it. I never got a disc from a store
> that was used and in bad condition, in fact, they usually look as if
> they were new.
>
> If you buy from eBay or another individual this may be an issue, but
> then most individuals will sell "as-is" and I doubt someone on eBay
> would give you an exchange.
>
> hashi wrote:
>
>>I'd like to be able to make sure a used game I get is good while I
>
> still
>
>>have time to exchange it. With PS1 games I can use something called
>
> cd-
>
>>DVDspeed that can surface scan the cd disk for errors and report if
>
> there
>
>>are any unreadable or damaged sectors.
>>
>>Anyone know if cd-dvdspeed can scan xbox DVD's too? or of something
>
> else I
>
>>can use?
>>
>>cd-dvdspeed is at:
>>http://www.cdspeed2000.com/
>
>
me thinks the OP is dead.
May 6, 2005 5:17:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Doug Jacobs wrote:

>
> I do remember getting into a heated argument with a manager at Best Buy in
> Michigan after he refused to give me a refund for a PC CDRom game that
> wasn't working on my system (was incompatible with my graphics card)


I forgot to ask ! How could this be so? your PC can do everything mine
does according to an earlier thread right? I've never had a problem with
any game on my current pc of 2+ years.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 9:26:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

I think the issue here is that the store does not support the software
and that the companies making the software require that it cannot be
returned unopened. It makes perfects sense, because as said before, it
opens the door WAY too much for people walking around making copies of
everything.

I had a similar issue with CompUSA and they would not take a game back
my wife's brother had bought there. It would not run on the PC at all,
though the computer had all the minimum requirements stated on the
outside of the box. I went to the manufacturers website and tried all
troubleshooting tips and downloaded patches and it would not work.
CompUSA did not take it back but gave me the contact for the software
maker. One 5 mins phonecall and I got a claim number and put it in a
package to the company with my receipt. They refunded the game price
plus tax and shipping.

Anyway, my point is that you ought to complain to the software maker,
not the re-seller. Same with many stores not taking items back that
break during the warrenty cycle and tell you to contact the
manufacturerer instead for warrenty claims.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 11:23:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Well, I found that in most cases being reasonable and courteous will
get you much farther than giving people heat -- though at times that
may be helpful. However, Newton's Third law applies to more things than
some people may think at first!
May 6, 2005 5:23:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Christian Winter wrote:
> I think the issue here is that the store does not support the software
> and that the companies making the software require that it cannot be
> returned unopened. It makes perfects sense, because as said before, it
> opens the door WAY too much for people walking around making copies of
> everything.
>
> I had a similar issue with CompUSA and they would not take a game back
> my wife's brother had bought there. It would not run on the PC at all,
> though the computer had all the minimum requirements stated on the
> outside of the box. I went to the manufacturers website and tried all
> troubleshooting tips and downloaded patches and it would not work.
> CompUSA did not take it back but gave me the contact for the software
> maker. One 5 mins phonecall and I got a claim number and put it in a
> package to the company with my receipt. They refunded the game price
> plus tax and shipping.
>
> Anyway, my point is that you ought to complain to the software maker,
> not the re-seller. Same with many stores not taking items back that
> break during the warrenty cycle and tell you to contact the
> manufacturerer instead for warrenty claims.
>


hear, hear. You are correct sir. And yes, we were losing the issue at
hand. It seems you handled that in a very professional manner, unlike
"someone" who would give a Best Buy manager a hard time for merely doing
his job. ;) 
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 12:28:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:

> Don't be silly Douglas. The posts you see in here that fit into your
> bucket are not pirates, they're "aspiring" Pirates. This would be the
> last place a seasoned pirate would come asking for advice on so many
> levels. Truth be told, pirating takes alot more ingenuity than buying a
> disc and putting it in one's drive....duhhhhhhhhh.....where de he go
> George :) 

Well, ok, you've got a point. The folks posting here are, at best, casual
pirates, as opposed to the true professionals who crack games for a
"living", not to mention the hordes of pirate companies that sell boots
for a few bucks on the streets of Hong Kong, Taipei, Beijing, etc.

> To "fix" this, I went to a pirate site to find a
> > crack for the program so you don't need the CD to play the game.

> You're a bbaaaaaaaaddddd maaaannnnnn :) 

Yeah, I'm teh l33t 3v!|, b4by...

> > Another problem is activation keys. People have written key generators,
> > and so it's entirely possible that you can purchase a new, factory sealed,
> > copy of a program, only to be told by the company that the key was already
> > registered.

> I have never, ever heard of such a thing. Please cite to me where you
> read such a story. The only problems I've ever heard were of steam's
> activation policy but that was something entirely different and was
> resolved.

Blizzard got into hot water twice - once with Starcraft, and another with
Diablo2. In both cases, legitimate users had found that their reg. # had
already been used, and Blizzard basically considered them suspicious until
the users managed to prove that they were the legitimate owner of the
stolen reg #. At that point, Blizzard issued them a new number. But
still, it was a pretty ugly PR mess for Blizzard at the launch of their
big titles...

Other examples of this include Windows XP and Norton AV. From what I've
heard, Microsoft was at least easier to deal with. Symantec, on the other
hand, seems intent on pissing off its customer base and driving them to
other solutions (which is just as well since their Norton stuff just
doesn't work.)

Basically, registration #s are just a bad idea, since it's only a matter
of time before the algorithm is cracked, and keygen programs are
distributed along with the .ISO's of the program.
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 1:01:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:

> > I do remember getting into a heated argument with a manager at Best Buy in
> > Michigan after he refused to give me a refund for a PC CDRom game that
> > wasn't working on my system (was incompatible with my graphics card)

> I forgot to ask ! How could this be so? your PC can do everything mine
> does according to an earlier thread right? I've never had a problem with
> any game on my current pc of 2+ years.

This wasn't my current PC, but my 486 from about 10 years ago. It was
still the days of DOS, where each game basically had to contain its own
sound and video drivers. For some reason, the game would freeze at
certain points on my system. The company said it was because of my video
card and didn't plan to fix it anytime soon. So I took the game back,
saying it didn't work - would never work - on my PC. Best Buy, meanwhile,
argued that I had somehow infected the CD with a virus which is why they
wouldn't take the game back.
May 7, 2005 1:56:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Doug Jacobs wrote:
> theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Don't be silly Douglas. The posts you see in here that fit into your
>>bucket are not pirates, they're "aspiring" Pirates. This would be the
>>last place a seasoned pirate would come asking for advice on so many
>>levels. Truth be told, pirating takes alot more ingenuity than buying a
>>disc and putting it in one's drive....duhhhhhhhhh.....where de he go
>>George :) 
>
>
> Well, ok, you've got a point. The folks posting here are, at best, casual
> pirates, as opposed to the true professionals who crack games for a
> "living", not to mention the hordes of pirate companies that sell boots
> for a few bucks on the streets of Hong Kong, Taipei, Beijing, etc.
>

Yeah, plus there raally is a huge intermediate fan base that write and
tune killer home brew apps for the xbox :) 

>> To "fix" this, I went to a pirate site to find a
>>
>>>crack for the program so you don't need the CD to play the game.
>
>
>>You're a bbaaaaaaaaddddd maaaannnnnn :) 
>
>
> Yeah, I'm teh l33t 3v!|, b4by...
>
>
>>>Another problem is activation keys. People have written key generators,
>>>and so it's entirely possible that you can purchase a new, factory sealed,
>>>copy of a program, only to be told by the company that the key was already
>>>registered.
>
>
>>I have never, ever heard of such a thing. Please cite to me where you
>>read such a story. The only problems I've ever heard were of steam's
>>activation policy but that was something entirely different and was
>>resolved.
>
>
> Blizzard got into hot water twice - once with Starcraft, and another with
> Diablo2. In both cases, legitimate users had found that their reg. # had
> already been used, and Blizzard basically considered them suspicious until
> the users managed to prove that they were the legitimate owner of the
> stolen reg #. At that point, Blizzard issued them a new number. But
> still, it was a pretty ugly PR mess for Blizzard at the launch of their
> big titles...
>
> Other examples of this include Windows XP and Norton AV. From what I've
> heard, Microsoft was at least easier to deal with. Symantec, on the other
> hand, seems intent on pissing off its customer base and driving them to
> other solutions (which is just as well since their Norton stuff just
> doesn't work.)

Wow, that is a new one by me. I generalized those folks to be ones that,
perhaps let the key get out their hands :)  Key gen taking real
keys...That's a novel concept but it doesn't pan out in my head. You
could download...say a new game....perhaps be the first to use any given
key that you button mashed to find and than already not be able to get
onto an online serve cuz of an invalid key so.....how could that be if
the key was perhaps legit at first? Moreso, what differentiates the
legit keys from the fakes in the ones the algorithm produces? Perhaps
the key gen finds a subset of numbers based off of one legit key?
>
> Basically, registration #s are just a bad idea, since it's only a matter
> of time before the algorithm is cracked, and keygen programs are
> distributed along with the .ISO's of the program.

Well hell, I'm all for eliminating that one but I don't see it
happening. Much multimedia these days is requiring activation now too
but that is usually just another layer on top of keys and is subject to
crack (albeit a little more work) too. I've seen some protection methods
that are near impossible to beat though cuz it always resides in the
registry and constantly moves around: Armadillo (newsleecher uses it).
May 7, 2005 2:00:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.xbox (More info?)

Doug Jacobs wrote:
> theOne <theOneOne@dodgeit.com> wrote:
>
>
>>>I do remember getting into a heated argument with a manager at Best Buy in
>>>Michigan after he refused to give me a refund for a PC CDRom game that
>>>wasn't working on my system (was incompatible with my graphics card)
>
>
>>I forgot to ask ! How could this be so? your PC can do everything mine
>>does according to an earlier thread right? I've never had a problem with
>>any game on my current pc of 2+ years.
>
>
> This wasn't my current PC, but my 486 from about 10 years ago. It was
> still the days of DOS, where each game basically had to contain its own
> sound and video drivers. For some reason, the game would freeze at
> certain points on my system. The company said it was because of my video
> card and didn't plan to fix it anytime soon. So I took the game back,
> saying it didn't work - would never work - on my PC. Best Buy, meanwhile,
> argued that I had somehow infected the CD with a virus which is why they
> wouldn't take the game back.


NO WAYYYY.....You took a game back for a DOS system? I take what I said
back; I'm suprised they had a return policy back in the Dinosaur days
Doug! How do you infect a Read Only Media? ;p You may very well be the
root of that policy. Perhaps, you were the first to have ever brought a
game back and they had to rething their store policy for a new future?
!