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Ivy chip stock cooler compound

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July 22, 2012 7:39:20 PM

I am waiting on the delivery of an i5 3570k cpu, and wish to know if the stock compound will stay pliable in case I want to upgrade the cooler. Thanks.
a c 152 à CPUs
July 22, 2012 7:42:52 PM

joeblo said:
I am waiting on the delivery of an i5 3570k cpu, and wish to know if the stock compound will stay pliable in case I want to upgrade the cooler. Thanks.


No. The thermal paste isn't something that can be transferred from one heatsink to the next. Once you put the heatsink on the CPU and turn it on it will begin to melt. If you get a new heatsink you will have to wipe off the old thermal paste and clean it then re-apply a new coat of thermal paste if the new heatsink doesn't come with it pre-applied.
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a c 119 à CPUs
July 22, 2012 7:48:08 PM

every 3rd party heatsync i have bought has come with its own thermal paste. often enough for 5+ applications. the only 1 that gave enough to do 2 or less was zalman on the 9500a led which came with a small sachet rather than a syringe.
dont forget even a new cpu should be cleaned b4 you apply any paste.
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a c 186 à CPUs
July 22, 2012 8:46:56 PM

You'll need new thermal paste!
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August 1, 2012 2:27:42 AM

I totally asked my question wrong, and for that I am very sorry!

What I really need to know is; will I be able to separate the heat-sink from the processor when, and if I choose to upgrade?
I have read stories of difficulty pulling off the heat-sink after if sets up over time. I was wondering if anyone has had any issues or experience with Intels parts

Thank you, and again, I apologize for the miscommunication.
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a c 97 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 3:07:23 AM

After a long while the thermal compound can cause the cooler to stick to the CPU. If you are trying to remove a cooler from an old CPU, you may want to run a CPU stress testing utility like Prime95 for a bit first to warm up the CPU, loosening up the thermal paste's hold, then shut down, unplug the computer, and remove the cooler. Using a hairdryer to warm up the thermal compound may also work, but you would want to be careful with that, as that may cause electrostatic discharge, which could fry your components.

Just be careful when pulling the cooler off of an older CPU, if it isn't budging, warm it up first, and try again, do not try and yank it with full force. Removing the cooler and reapplying thermal paste regularly can also help you avoid this problem.
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August 1, 2012 8:27:47 PM

Best answer selected by joeblo.
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