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Seeing the Shot

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Anonymous
June 17, 2005 10:13:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

All digital cameras take pictures, but are the pictures any good?

I find the biggest issue with picture taking is 'seeing the shot' sometimes
called 'composition'. Over the years I have been training myself to 'see the
shot' and have had moderate success. I now know that a really good picture
can be recognized even at thumbnail size because of its good composition.

Can anyone give me some more hints at how to improve my ability to 'see the
shot'.

Thanks,

ER

More about : shot

Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:25:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

There is alot of info out there about what looks natural, where the
horizon should be in a nature picture, trees near/far, people on one
side or the other. It doesn't radically change a picture but just
looks more pleasing. One good thing I've found is just look at other
people's pictures, then think of *why* you like that picture, is it
just that it's clear, would you like it if this item was on that side,
if it's a digital picture, put it on your computer then flip it
horizontally, does it look better/worse (if better then you might be
onto something) :) 

Also browse around art.com and on photo.net just seeing what people
have done, and what you like, etc...usually if you look at a picture
and like the layout you won't be as critical about the colors and such.
Good Luck!
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 6:42:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 06:13:28 -0700, "ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> wrote:

>All digital cameras take pictures, but are the pictures any good?

Some, yes.

>I find the biggest issue with picture taking is 'seeing the shot' sometimes
>called 'composition'. Over the years I have been training myself to 'see the
>shot' and have had moderate success. I now know that a really good picture
>can be recognized even at thumbnail size because of its good composition.
>
>Can anyone give me some more hints at how to improve my ability to 'see the
>shot'.

Watch movies - of any age. Hollywood know more about this than most
people realize. Look at each scene and ask yourself why it appears
natural / nice / atmospheric / erotic and then you'll be able to
replicate this in the field.

Of course, you may need some specialist equipment: A few Angelina
Jolies and other hot looking actresses can help....

If you want to read more about it here are a couple of google
keywords:

Gestalt Theory,
Rule of thirds.
Asymmetry.

Maybe start here; A useful collection of composition articles:
http://photoinf.com/

Take lots of notes and make yourself a little booklet of composition
guides to carry with you in the field. Maybe even shoot your own
examples of each rule/guide as an exercise.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Related resources
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 6:42:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Owamanga" <owamanga(not-this-bit)@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:c7k5b1phdfnqfucljlcm9cmn0jv2kb59pb@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 06:13:28 -0700, "ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> wrote:
>
>>All digital cameras take pictures, but are the pictures any good?
>
> Some, yes.
>
>>I find the biggest issue with picture taking is 'seeing the shot'
>>sometimes
>>called 'composition'. Over the years I have been training myself to 'see
>>the
>>shot' and have had moderate success. I now know that a really good picture
>>can be recognized even at thumbnail size because of its good composition.
>>
>>Can anyone give me some more hints at how to improve my ability to 'see
>>the
>>shot'.
>
> Watch movies - of any age. Hollywood know more about this than most
> people realize. Look at each scene and ask yourself why it appears
> natural / nice / atmospheric / erotic and then you'll be able to
> replicate this in the field.
>
> Of course, you may need some specialist equipment: A few Angelina
> Jolies and other hot looking actresses can help....
>
> If you want to read more about it here are a couple of google
> keywords:
>
> Gestalt Theory,
> Rule of thirds.
> Asymmetry.
>
> Maybe start here; A useful collection of composition articles:
> http://photoinf.com/
>
> Take lots of notes and make yourself a little booklet of composition
> guides to carry with you in the field. Maybe even shoot your own
> examples of each rule/guide as an exercise.
>
> --
> Owamanga!
> http://www.pbase.com/owamanga


Excellent Info, Thanks.

ER
June 18, 2005 4:08:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> wrote in message
news:42b2cd44_3@newsgate.x-privat.org...
> All digital cameras take pictures, but are the pictures any good?
>
> I find the biggest issue with picture taking is 'seeing the shot'
> sometimes called 'composition'. Over the years I have been training myself
> to 'see the shot' and have had moderate success. I now know that a really
> good picture can be recognized even at thumbnail size because of its good
> composition.
>
> Can anyone give me some more hints at how to improve my ability to 'see
> the shot'.
>
> Thanks,
>
> ER
>
>
Hi there.

What you have said is what makes the difference between good photographers
and the happy snappers.

You can read books, and look at the pictures, study other peoples work, and
work out what you like about it, and do everything else suggested by the
other posters.

BUT the most important thing to do, is study your own pictures. The
failures as well as the successes. Really study them. What is good about
the good ones?

The good ones are the ones you really like, and sometimes that is in spite
of what other people say. You still have to think about what those other
people say, and be very honest with yourself.

What should you have done to make the duffs better. Cropping, etc, can
improve not so great pictures, but it will never make them into
masterpieces, so what should you have been thinking about at the taking
stage?

Did you really know what was the actual "Subject", and what were you trying
to say about it?

Take lots of pictures, but don't rush at it. Try to imagine the picture you
want to create, before you press the button. Remember it is a "Creative"
process, and not just a Recording process.

Roy G
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 3:19:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 06:13:28 -0700, "ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> wrote:

>All digital cameras take pictures, but are the pictures any good?
>
>I find the biggest issue with picture taking is 'seeing the shot' sometimes
>called 'composition'. Over the years I have been training myself to 'see the
>shot' and have had moderate success. I now know that a really good picture
>can be recognized even at thumbnail size because of its good composition.
>
>Can anyone give me some more hints at how to improve my ability to 'see the
>shot'.

You might take a look a formal theories of composition as taught in
fine arts school.

A classic text on composition is _Composition_ by Arthur Wesley Dow
any good library should have a copy.

Spending time in art museums looking at how great painting work.

For one not looking at a more classic approach there's this:

http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/id-1742....


*************************************************************

"People, in various places and times, have not merely thought
different things. They have thought them differently.
It is probable that their most fundamental cerebral
process have changed through time. Their deepest emotional
drives and desires may themselves have been transformed.
Significant elements of continuity cannot be understood
without a sense of the discontinuities, too."

_Historians' Fallacies_
"The fallacy of the universal man"
David Hackett Fisher
!