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First build ever, trying not to go over $800

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April 10, 2012 12:27:26 AM

Hello, as the title says, yes, this is going to be my first computer build ever! I'm pretty excited about it yet a little overwhelmed by all of the options, all while trying to stay on a budget. I'm planning to use this computer for gaming (Diablo 3, Starcraft, Minecraft, BF3, Crysis, etc) internet, playing videos, editing game play videos, and work stuff. I've managed to compile a list of the parts that i'm thinking about getting. So here it is!

CPU- i5-3750k ivy bridge (when comes out)

Mobo-MSI Z77A-G45 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU- sapphire Radeon HD 6870 1GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU- OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W Modular http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

case- NZXT Guardian 921 or Thermaltake Chaser MK-I
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Memory-CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Things i already have-
-mouse
-keyboard
-monitor
-Hard Drive (Seagate Barracuda 250gb)
-OS (Vista business or windows 7 if my friend has an extra)


Now here are my concerns...
1-Since the Radeon HD 6870 used PCI e2.0 and my mobo has PCI e3.0, will they still work together at 3.0 speed?
2-I want to have this computer available for upgrades and/or OC (later on I'm thinking dual GPU's) but will the PSU be enough, also if there is a better PSU, plz give links if so.
3-I doubt my Hard drive is enough, so i'd like a SSD to go with it, how much space should i get? i was thinking 120gb (im on a budget remember :??:  )
4-If I OC what is a good heatsink? (I don't really trust water cooling considering 1 leak=DOOM! and its expensive)
5-Are those case good? heard the thermaltake's power button can be flawed sometimes, but how is airflow and build quality?

I think that is it so far, tell me if i need anything else for this build or have any recommendations on parts that i should change. Also, any build advice would be much appreciated since it is my first build. Thanks! :D 





More about : build 800

April 10, 2012 6:37:30 AM

A 120GB SSD is plenty big enough (but that's easy to say when I have a 1.5TB storage drive).
The most popular heatsink is Hyper 212 EVO or 212 + and it's very inexpensive.
Cooler Master HAF series are the most popular and well-reviewed cases on NewEgg besides the Antec 900 right now (HAF = high air flow).

I don't believe your GPU will run at 3.0 speed.
PCI-e3.0x16 is backwards compatible, but won't boost the speed of a 2.0 or 2.1 card to 3.0 (any objections to this statement are welcome, I'm curious too).

For motherboard, ASROck is a more popular and well-reviewed brand and you'd get better performance, especially for OC'ing on the Extreme4.
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April 10, 2012 6:52:37 AM

All PCI is backwards compatible. But something to keep in mind. You could probably make do with a board that isn't the Z77 chipset. Mainly because Z77 only brings native USB 3.0 to the table and sure there is PCI 3.0 support but only with an Ivy Bridge chip and Gen3 already does that.

Check out my $850 here:
http://www.squidoo.com/electronicandmore
Since you already have a HDD it only totals to $806 roughly. You can always just switch the i5 2500K to the i5 3750K. The Asrock Extreme3 Gen3 Z68 is a more than capable board, cheap to that can use PCI 3.0 and still has many capabilities.
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Related resources
April 11, 2012 1:42:20 AM

I was REALLY looking into the ASRock Extreme 3 mobo, but since it was the z68 chipset, i did not think it would support IB. That is really good to know that it does, because i'm definitely going to get that mobo now. :D  I'm on a budget now but would it be better to really invest in a high end video card now or to just get, say a 6870 now, then later on i could get a 2nd one using Crossfire if i wanted? which setup would perform better (one really good or 2 mid-range GPU's)? Another thing that i just recently thought of, since IB is coming out will SB prices lower at all? if so i think i would just get a i5-2500k for a little bit less and it is still a fantastic CPU! aznshinobi, nice set up!, however is there a modular or semi-modular PSU that you could recommend? if not, that's ok.
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April 11, 2012 1:43:43 AM

It supports it, but you won't gain the benefits of IB with it.
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April 11, 2012 6:35:54 PM

I would go with a high end card like the 7850 or 7870 now. The 6870 is being discontinued like the rest of the 6xxx the supplies will dwindle and it'll be hard for you to find another 6870 to Crossfire with. The 7850 is basically a 6950 in my book, performance is pretty much equivalent. But don't think that's all to it, the 7850 has better temps, power consumption, lower noise and etc.

Get the i5 2500K it'll last, IB is only really bringing the support for PCI 3.0 (even then the PCI 2.0 bottleneck on PCI 3.0 cards isn't really that much) and native USB 3.0 which also isn't a HUGE deal, though it makes for lower motherboard prices. Though as Panther Point just released prices are inflated.

IB actually does bring higher (slightly) performance, lower temps and power consumption Azeem. Not enough to justify an upgrade, but maybe if you were buying at that time.

PSU, I'd go modular just to cable manage, but if don't care about how the case looks inside. Go non-modular is fine. "semi" is really vague as that's the wording Antec uses and it just has like 2 cables that are modular.
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April 11, 2012 7:13:16 PM

sinister8102 said:
I was REALLY looking into the ASRock Extreme 3 mobo, but since it was the z68 chipset, i did not think it would support IB. That is really good to know that it does, because i'm definitely going to get that mobo now. :D  I'm on a budget now but would it be better to really invest in a high end video card now or to just get, say a 6870 now, then later on i could get a 2nd one using Crossfire if i wanted? which setup would perform better (one really good or 2 mid-range GPU's)? Another thing that i just recently thought of, since IB is coming out will SB prices lower at all? if so i think i would just get a i5-2500k for a little bit less and it is still a fantastic CPU! aznshinobi, nice set up!, however is there a modular or semi-modular PSU that you could recommend? if not, that's ok.


NO!!!!! :ouch:  Get the ASRock Extreme4 mobo... it's the Z77 edition of the Extreme3! A 6870 isn't really "high-end" :D  ... a GTX 560 Ti would be ideal (or a 7850, but that's getting really pricey). One really good GPU performs much better than 2 mid-range, because the one single one doesn't have any problems with the two getting too hot, or not calibrating to each other correctly.
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April 11, 2012 7:52:21 PM

Disagree. Z77 brings nothing but native USB and seeing the benchmarks it gives slightly more performance, $18 difference though with a tight budget. It's better spent on the GPU. That's the difference from a 560 Ti to getting close to a 7850.

And, actually that is false. The 2x6850 didn't have huge heat issues and drivers issues in the end. But it beat out a single 580 for far less cost and heat. It's like how 2x7850's will run cool as hell and beat out a single 680 by a margin.
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April 11, 2012 10:08:42 PM

Are you sure? I've always heard everywhere that Z77 is the best motherboard for IB... anyway, I do know that Z68 might not support the next generation (the "tock"), whereas the Z77 surely will... the Z77 is going to last longer.

Two GPUs running side-by-side usually generate quite a bit of heat... especially when you only have two slots, and you can't space them out. I was assuming he meant a single GPU or two mid-range GPUs that, combined, had the same performance as the single GPU. Of course 2x7850s will beat a 680... but I don't think they'll be all that cool.
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April 11, 2012 10:16:13 PM

aznshinobi said:
I would go with a high end card like the 7850 or 7870 now. The 6870 is being discontinued like the rest of the 6xxx the supplies will dwindle and it'll be hard for you to find another 6870 to Crossfire with. The 7850 is basically a 6950 in my book, performance is pretty much equivalent. But don't think that's all to it, the 7850 has better temps, power consumption, lower noise and etc.

Get the i5 2500K it'll last, IB is only really bringing the support for PCI 3.0 (even then the PCI 2.0 bottleneck on PCI 3.0 cards isn't really that much) and native USB 3.0 which also isn't a HUGE deal, though it makes for lower motherboard prices. Though as Panther Point just released prices are inflated.

IB actually does bring higher (slightly) performance, lower temps and power consumption Azeem. Not enough to justify an upgrade, but maybe if you were buying at that time.

PSU, I'd go modular just to cable manage, but if don't care about how the case looks inside. Go non-modular is fine. "semi" is really vague as that's the wording Antec uses and it just has like 2 cables that are modular.

I know IB brings all that too. I wasn't born yesterday. Also, if he is deciding on getting IB, why tell him otherwise? It's not like he is making a stupid decision. IB will release at the same prices SB did, so I see no reason not to get IB.
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April 11, 2012 10:29:51 PM

I think overall the idea behind going Z77 is to have the latest and greatest, but the Gen3 Z68 boards SHOULD support Ivy Bridge. Obviously if mobo manufacturers are able to make Z77 boards, they know the specifics of Ivy Bridge and the Gen3 boards say they support Ivy Bridge and Z77 boards say they support 32nm (SB) and 22nm (IB) CPU's. I'm betting the benchmarks will show a much bigger difference between Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPU's vs. Z68 to Z77 boards using Ivy Bridge.
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April 11, 2012 10:31:50 PM

I always thought that semi-modular were the best (never used any, though). Some cables don't need to be detachable, and modular always has the risk of a cable coming loose. Just try to keep most of the cables behind the motherboard in the back of the case (not in the middle of your components), so as to not restrict airflow.
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April 11, 2012 10:36:38 PM

The Seasonic semi-modular I have is great, everything feels like it plugs in solid, nothing feels loose at all. The cables can be a bit stiff but the only one that really gives any trouble is the CPU power, but now that I've used modular, I'll never go back!
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April 11, 2012 11:53:45 PM

sharkbyte5150 said:
I think overall the idea behind going Z77 is to have the latest and greatest, but the Gen3 Z68 boards SHOULD support Ivy Bridge. Obviously if mobo manufacturers are able to make Z77 boards, they know the specifics of Ivy Bridge and the Gen3 boards say they support Ivy Bridge and Z77 boards say they support 32nm (SB) and 22nm (IB) CPU's. I'm betting the benchmarks will show a much bigger difference between Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPU's vs. Z68 to Z77 boards using Ivy Bridge.

The CPU is what will make IB consume less power, not the motherboard. You still need both to reap all the benefits of IB.
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April 12, 2012 1:55:11 AM

-If i get the IB then I think I will get the i5-3750k or i5-3450...i am still not sure if i am going to OC, if i don't OC, i think the 3450 would be better for my budget. If i do OC i hear the 3750k will handle it better (correct me if i am wrong). Is there even much different between the two? (not much info is out ik, but im guessing the relation its similar to the 2500k and the 2400)

-That Radeon HD 7850 looks pretty good, (been watching reviews and looking at benchmarks) and it has PCI 3.0 speed, better temps etc etc, but the price would be hard to fit in my budget... :(  Hmmmmm...is there a GPU that matched the 6870 in performance and price but with 3.0?

Still debating over what mobo to get, im sure it is going to be an ASRock mobo but z77 or z68 etc...idk yet :??: 




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April 12, 2012 4:35:28 AM

For OC'ing, you need one of the CPU's with "K" in the name, they're unlocked and meant for that. The boards for Z77 are already out so if you're going to wait for IVB CPU, just get a Z77 board to go with it. ASUS P8Z77-V Pro (or non Pro) or ASRock Z77 Extreme4 will probably be two of the most popular boards once IVB CPU's start selling.
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April 12, 2012 6:10:37 AM

The i5 3750K will give you the ability to overclock if you ever chose, and yes the 3450 and 3750K relationship is like the i5 2400 and i5 2500K.

As for the 6870, no there isn't. The 7770 is closest but still lacks, only after overclocking does the 7770 reach the 6870. TBH what you shouldn't be looking at is the sockets all too much. Z68 supports IB just fine and Gen3 will still give you PCI 3.0. Just go with the Asrock Extreme3 Gen3 Z68 to save money.

PCI 2.0 isn't even fully saturated, PCI 3.0 doesn't give the huge performance gain, it is the chip architecture itself.

I'd go with the Asrock Extreme3 Gen3 Z68, i5 3750K (if same pricing), 7850. Spend more now so you don't have to spend it later. Though that's just me.
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April 12, 2012 7:36:22 AM

I respectfully disagree. IB will do to PCIe 3.0 what X79 did to PCIe 3.0: full support and saturation.
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April 12, 2012 7:58:44 AM

Your statement makes no sense? "IB will do to PCIe 3.0 what X79 did to PCIe 3.0: full support and saturation."

X79 hasn't been released yet, and if you meant what I said with Gen3 will still give him PCI 3.0. It's true, Gen3 isn't technically "full" PCIe 3.0, but pretty close. Close enough that the difference is hardly noticeable. In fact from a PCI 2.0 to a PCI 3.0 slot using a 7xxx or 6xx the difference wouldn't be that noticeable at all.

As for your talk about saturation. That is not true. Even now we do not fully use up all of PCI 2.0's potential. There is no way X79 would bring full saturation to PCI 3.0 when we can't even use up all of PCI 2.0 with Ivy Bridge.
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April 12, 2012 8:21:46 AM

The build is very unbalanced for gaming right now (so are 95% of the builds on these forums, though) For games, you want your CPU and your video card to top out around the same time, neither one bottlenecking the other. In the current build, your video card will run out of juice eons before your processor does.

Fomr your list of criteria, gaming is the most processor intensive thing you're going to be doing. A Pentium G860 paired with a HD 7850 will give you a ton better gaming performance than a 3750k/6870.
Socket 1155 chip, so you can swap it out down the road if you feel the need. Lot cheaper than buying a 2500k and swapping that out, esp. since you don't need the processing muscle for anything.

*really, you could even drop down to a G630 and still get the full benefit of a 7850.
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April 12, 2012 8:41:33 AM

aznshinobi said:

Even now we do not fully use up all of PCI 2.0's potential. There is no way X79 would bring full saturation to PCI 3.0 when we can't even use up all of PCI 2.0 with Ivy Bridge.


That is not true. When you have a pci-e 2.0 motherboard with 3 or 4 pci-e 16x slots, 2 of those slots (on a 3 slots) or all of them on a 4 slot only have 4 lanes to use. This hampers high end video cards. In fact, the 6770's I use are about the fastest card you can use in a 4 lane pci-e slot without significant degradation.
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April 12, 2012 4:42:01 PM

azeem40 said:
The CPU is what will make IB consume less power, not the motherboard. You still need both to reap all the benefits of IB.



We're talking about two completely different things.
I'm saying you will not see a huge difference running the same Ivy Bridge CPU on Z68 vs. Z77.
You're talking about power consumption and "the CPU is what will make IB consume less power" makes no sense, the CPU IS Ivy Bridge and it sounds like you're saying motherboards will change the CPU's power consumption.
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April 12, 2012 6:17:36 PM

quilciri said:
The build is very unbalanced for gaming right now (so are 95% of the builds on these forums, though) For games, you want your CPU and your video card to top out around the same time, neither one bottlenecking the other. In the current build, your video card will run out of juice eons before your processor does.

Fomr your list of criteria, gaming is the most processor intensive thing you're going to be doing. A Pentium G860 paired with a HD 7850 will give you a ton better gaming performance than a 3750k/6870.
Socket 1155 chip, so you can swap it out down the road if you feel the need. Lot cheaper than buying a 2500k and swapping that out, esp. since you don't need the processing muscle for anything.

*really, you could even drop down to a G630 and still get the full benefit of a 7850.


Instead of assuming what you are saying applies to the OP, read his post first. OP is editing videos, gameplay videos which would be 1920x1080 and if he's using any hefty editing program like Premiere Pro, it'll be in need of the i5 xxxx.

Also Quil, I was arguing that we don't make use of all of PCI 2.0 so how can we make use of all of PCI 3.0 now?

What you are arguing has nothing to do with what I'm referring to right now. You're talking about multiple cards. I'm referring to just one, on one slot. Unless I'm misunderstanding what you wrote.

As for what I'm talking about: http://www.overclock.net/t/1188376/hardwarecanucks-hd-7...
A "PCI 3.0" card on a PCI 2.0 slot and PCI 3.0 slot using the Gen3 switching on the Asus ROG board I believe. It had no effect at all. So a conclusion can be simple, either PCI 2.0 still has juice left that we haven't used, or we're not close to utilizing all of PCI 3.0

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April 12, 2012 8:49:25 PM

aznshinobi said:
Instead of assuming what you are saying applies to the OP, read his post first. OP is editing videos, gameplay videos which would be 1920x1080 and if he's using any hefty editing program like Premiere Pro, it'll be in need of the i5 xxxx.


...*sigh*You're making the assumption here. You don't have enough information to go on as far as video editing. I made a guesstimation that he would be using Fraps or a similar capture program to record and the end format would be an easily converted to format (for online posting). Given that the majority of video editing, especially of gameplay footage, is for online posting, I made an educated guess.

But thank you for pointing out that we could use more information on the video editing part.

There is no simple rule saying that if you edit X, you need Y hardware. If his end format is AVCHD or RED 4K, then I would agree with you. Being that video editing wasn't anywhere near the top of his criteria, I doubt this. Converting an HDV 1080 video to HDV 720, DV, or even easier format doesn't require anywhere near as much processing horsepower.

While more physical and logical cores, more ram, a bigger L3 cache, and a CUDA based card would all help with video editing, unless it's the main purpose of the build, you'd be better off scaling back several of those things...

If I remember right, fraps records with no GOP structure in uncompressed formats, which will puts a heftier burden on storage and memory than the CPU.
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April 12, 2012 9:50:39 PM

aznshinobi said:

What you are arguing has nothing to do with what I'm referring to right now. You're talking about multiple cards. I'm referring to just one, on one slot. Unless I'm misunderstanding what you wrote.


You're right here, sorry about that. It sounded like you were making a blanket statement.
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April 12, 2012 10:26:16 PM

What you are stating is true, there is no set requirement on what you need to run what. Minimum requirements for CS5 are fairly low. But you would require something better for a smoother experience and faster one at that. I understand ram needs to be accounted, hence 8GB. But you'd still notice a difference from editing with a G860/i3 2100 or an i5 3750K/i5 2400/i5 xxxx. What you are talking about I understand. Maximization of frames but with a CPU that is good enough to utilize it.

But that doesn't mean the CPU gives you a smooth experience for more intensive apps. Granted, those apps have fairly lower requirements to use. I've used FRAPs and the i5 2500K definitely made a difference when recording coming from a 955. The experience was definitely by far smoother.
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April 12, 2012 11:12:16 PM

No argument there. My point is that video editing was near last on hist list of uses for the new machine. gaming was first. While that doesn't necessarily mean that gaming is his highest priority, that's the best guess pending further clarification.

With that in mind, I'm optimizing for his list of uses, giving the most weight to things listed earlier.

Making a similar point in another thread, you waste less money swapping out a G860 when you need a stronger processor than you do swapping out a 6870 when you need a stronger vid card, and if gaming is your highest priority, you'll have better performance in the meantime with the stronger card combo.
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April 12, 2012 11:42:30 PM

Tbh, I usually go with a much higher CPU than GPU because the CPU is the main backbone of my computer, while the GPU is only for gaming. Because of that, you can still use your computer with a bad GPU, but you can't use it with a bad CPU. Also, CPUs are much cheaper, and will last longer. I've never heard of a build that has CPU and GPU at equal performances... to me, that just seems strange. After all, you don't upgrade CPUs nearly as often as you upgrade GPUs.
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April 13, 2012 12:00:20 AM

ddan49 said:
Tbh, I usually go with a much higher CPU than GPU because the CPU is the main backbone of my computer, while the GPU is only for gaming. Because of that, you can still use your computer with a bad GPU, but you can't use it with a bad CPU. Also, CPUs are much cheaper, and will last longer. I've never heard of a build that has CPU and GPU at equal performances... to me, that just seems strange. After all, you don't upgrade CPUs nearly as often as you upgrade GPUs.


The vast majority of builds, including the "gaming" builds on these forums don't build a balanced machine to begin with. I can only imagine there's a slight bias towards having bragging rights of "I have X processor" that hinders building for optimal gaming performance. I can't begrudge anyone a good brag, so if that's what you want, more power to you :) . I'm just trying to get you the best gaming performance for your $, as well as making the eventual upgrade as cheap for you as possible.

Tom's actually has a 4 part guide on building balanced game machines
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-balanced-plat...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/balanced-gaming-pc,...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/balanced-gaming-pc-...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/balanced-gaming-pc-...
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April 13, 2012 12:14:45 AM

Hmmm... you may be right. It's just that I generally go into a build with the idea that I'm getting a CPU that'll last me the longest out of all the build components (except stuff like PSU and CPU cooler...), so I don't have to worry about it for a while. After all, pricing for individual hardware parts is like x+yk, where x is the base price and y is the steps up you want, with k being a constant price. Basically, a CPU twice as good as the worst CPU isn't twice the price... it's about 3/2 the price.

My point is that it's ideal to upgrade as few parts as possible constantly... one would be ideal. Most people just upgrade their GPU (meaning on a regular basis... like every two years), and only upgrade their CPU/mobo every once in a long while (5 years, etc.). Or at least that's what I thought.

I do have to say that if you're going for a one-time build, quilciri's build is probably what you want. Bad CPUs DO scare a lot of people, but it's not a problem for gaming (unless you're playing CPU intensive games like multiplayer, Starcraft, and Skyrim I believe). However, if you're converting a lot of video files, you want a decent CPU... like an i5-2500k or an i5-3750k ;) 
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April 13, 2012 12:34:50 AM

The build I'm proposing isn't a one time build. As the G860 is a socket 1155 chip, you can stick it in an Ivy bridge mobo, and swap it out later as easily as you would a video card. (the bitch of removing the CPU cooler, cleaning it, reapplying the thermal paste, etc, interspersed with colorful expletives notwithstanding :D )

Quote:
Basically, a CPU twice as good as the worst CPU isn't twice the price... it's about 3/2 the price.


The G860 is $100 on newegg right now, while the 2500k is still $220. I'd imagine the 3750k will be well over $200 as well.
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April 13, 2012 12:40:19 AM

Yes, but the performance hike for only $100... you know what? Let's let the OP put in his/her opinion on this... after all, we are both trying to help the OP. I haven't heard any feedback, and debate for the sake of debate could be done elsewhere.

I do see your point, by the way. Also, I'm fairly sure the 2500k is more than twice as powerful as the G860... although I don't know for sure.

Hold on... is the G860 one of the recommended gaming CPUs of April in like the $110 category or something? I'm almost certain I've seen it before. You know... I'll check.

Yep: This makes enough of a performance difference to push today's $100 processor recommendation out in front of AMD's Phenom II X4 955 in our sub-$200 CPU gaming comparison. Because the LGA 1155-based Core i3s and Pentiums are unfortunately crippled by locked multiplier ratios, paying a little extra for more stock frequency could be worth the added cost in this case.
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April 13, 2012 12:41:23 AM

You've got a point. By the way, 3.0 gigahertz is pretty impressive for $100 (although despite what AMD fanboys will tell you, "clock speed" isn't all that matters. As long as you're Intel, though, it's fine to compare them that way. Keep in mind there's no overclocking for the G860, by the way)
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April 21, 2012 1:57:16 PM

sharkbyte5150 said:
For OC'ing, you need one of the CPU's with "K" in the name, they're unlocked and meant for that. The boards for Z77 are already out so if you're going to wait for IVB CPU, just get a Z77 board to go with it. ASUS P8Z77-V Pro (or non Pro) or ASRock Z77 Extreme4 will probably be two of the most popular boards once IVB CPU's start selling.



This thread is awesome! My oldest daughter is stealing my PC :sarcastic:  so I am doing the exact same research as Sinister8012. That being said, looks to me like you all have done all the work for me.

I did however come across this video comparing all the ASUS Z77 boards. Also, the comments are to this novice, very informative. Lots of info about other components as well.

One point I didn't quite understand was a comparison of the pro, deluxe, and what I believed they called the Ultra something or other. The top 3 ASUS Z77 boards. Unanimous was go for Deluxe over Pro and pass on the Elite Ultra Whatever they called it, unless you were Mitt Romney.

I apologize for my vagueness in this 3rd top board. I did try to find my notes, but tbh, not hard enough. So I mega thank all of you for your patience. Main point is thought maybe Sinister8012 could benefit from video. It crawls along somewhat, but I did learn alot. Don't forget the comments. They get quite entertaining!

Oh and I pretty sure I posted this wrong. Do I get mulligans for being 46 and a mother of two drop dead gorgeous female teenagers? It's the Xanax that causes my need for mulligans!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uq0TPkwoBwg

Thank you all so much for the time you put in to this info.
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April 25, 2012 11:38:07 PM

Yes so i am back with some tweaks to my set up, I am hoping to order my parts about the 1st week of June, so I have some time on my hands and that also lets me raise my budget to $950~ maybe $1000 :D  . I Decided I will not overclock, and I want the ability to use crossfire later so that if i wanted to have three monitors down the road I could. So here is what i am thinking now...ended up needing an OS btw :??: 

Thermaltake MK-1 Chaser (I have fallen in love with this cool case) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

OCZ ZS series 750w http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Windows 7 64-bit OEM

Corsair 8gb Ram DDR3 1600 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Now here are the 2 options I am contemplating...
#1. I5-2400 (or 2500 on Tiger direct for same price) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASRock z68 Extreme3 Gen3 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX Double D Radeon HD 6950 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

#2. I5-3550 IB

ASRock Z77 Extreme4 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Radeon HD 7850 Sapphire 2gb http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I know most of those parts could be swapped between those 2 options, but that is just what i was thinking. Looking at benchmarks, http://www.hwcompare.com/12077/radeon-hd-6950-vs-radeon... the Radeon HD 6950 looks like the better GPU (as far as texel rate) and it is cheaper, but since the 7000 series is in, idk how long the 6000 series will still be around, especially if i would want to get another one to have a crossfire setup l8r. What do you recommend?

Since i will have some time before i actually build this baby, i figure i will have some time for more reviews on the IB to come out to see if it has any problems (it seems like most pieces of new hardware do when they first come out until patches are released)
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April 26, 2012 12:39:23 AM

#2. it's not even close.

The 7850 is a stronger card than the 6950. You'll be better off looking at benchmarks of games and applications you want to use rather than card-preview numbers.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/amd-radeon-hd-7850-and-78...

p.s. I notice neither chip is k series. Are you abandoning plans to overclock? Looks like the 3550 will debut at $195, for that price, I'd still go with a 2500k

Also, You may want ram with shorter heatsink fins. Those on the corsair are too tall for many tower coolers.
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April 26, 2012 12:46:22 AM

^+1

2. But if you're getting the Extreme4 you might as well get the i5 3570K. You're paying for a board that can overclock, you might as well go with the chip that can for slightly more.

If not might as well go with the Asrock Extreme3 Gen3 Z68 get basically the same performance save some money and put that money towards the i5 3570K. The Gen3 will still allow PCI 3.0 utilization with Ivy and USB 3.0 native is not a huge deal. You still get SLI and CF at 8x/8x and solid overclocking.
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April 26, 2012 1:42:54 AM

quilciri said:
#2. it's not even close.

The 7850 is a stronger card than the 6950. You'll be better off looking at benchmarks of games and applications you want to use rather than card-preview numbers.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/amd-radeon-hd-7850-and-78...

p.s. I notice neither chip is k series. Are you abandoning plans to overclock? Looks like the 3550 will debut at $195, for that price, I'd still go with a 2500k

Also, You may want ram with shorter heatsink fins. Those on the corsair are too tall for many tower coolers.

Thanks for that link, bookmarking that! :D  I have been pondering whether I should abandon overclocking due to what a pro has told me that happens when you overclock. (I was told that the paths in the CPU will start to disintegrate at a faster rate causing the life of the CPU to be cut) however, i figure the voltage and temperature will lower the life span but its useful lifespan is lower than its potential full lifespan...if that makes sense? Would you recommend overclocking?

Also, it never even crossed my mind about the Ram interfering with other components, so thanks for that heads up.

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April 26, 2012 2:57:47 AM

"Pro" is l;ying to you. It's not that much of a decrease. Maybe if you up voltages on the CPU to 1.52v or something like 1.5v+ and on the GPU I'm not sure but usually even after a major overclock, if you're not running the System 24/7 but running it a lot. You can last at least 5 years. I 100% recommend it to get the most out of your system.

1.5v is the ram voltage you want.

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!