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Digital Camera w/ Macro

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Anonymous
June 17, 2005 8:26:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm having trouble picking out a digital camera to use in a
lab/engineering role. I was originally going to recommend the Nikon
Coolpix 5400, but it seems that there are so many newer cameras now
available that there might be a better choice.

My requirements are:
A good macro mode for taking pictures of small features (e.g., machined
parts). (The 5400 has a 0.4" macro mode, which sounds useful.)
Ability to mount to a microscope. For taking pictures of even smaller
things it would be nice to mount the camera (temporarily) to an
inspection microscope. (There are microscope mounts available for the
5400.)

The other uses of the camera would be for general picture taking
indoors (documenting test setups, etc.)--things nearly every camera on
the market today can do.

It would probably be difficult to argue for a digital SLR due to their
higher cost. I also don't need the camera to be ultra-miniature or
very portable at all.

Does anyone know of a camera that would fit my needs especially well?

As mainly an aside, I also got the request for high speed (60+ FPS)
video (for verifying fast motion control), but I have not found
anything in the consumer digital camera market that offers anything
above 30 FPS and really do not expect to find it. Just in case, is
there a camera that does or will be offering such a feature?

I've read Steve's Digicams, but I've find it difficult to narrow the
field at all.

Any help would be appreciated.
Bradley

More about : digital camera macro

Anonymous
June 17, 2005 8:48:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Bradley Ferguson" <bradleyee@gmail.com> writes:
> A good macro mode for taking pictures of small features (e.g., machined
> parts). (The 5400 has a 0.4" macro mode, which sounds useful.)
> Ability to mount to a microscope. For taking pictures of even smaller
> things it would be nice to mount the camera (temporarily) to an
> inspection microscope. (There are microscope mounts available for the
> 5400.)

Sounds like you don't need high resolution. Try a video camera.
>
> As mainly an aside, I also got the request for high speed (60+ FPS)
> video (for verifying fast motion control), but I have not found
> anything in the consumer digital camera market that offers anything
> above 30 FPS and really do not expect to find it. Just in case, is
> there a camera that does or will be offering such a feature?

Most video cameras shoot 60 fps interlaced. There's software you
can use to separate the odd and even fields.
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 9:38:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bradley Ferguson wrote:
> ...a digital camera...Ability to mount to a microscope....for general
> picture taking indoors (documenting test setups, etc)...for high
> speed (60+ FPS) video (for verifying fast motion control)...


There is at least one digital camera out there currently in production
satisfying your requirements. I remember reading these in the specs
recently. It was not from one of the major camera manufacturers. Maybe, it
was Ricoh, Rollei, or Samsung. You may like to check them out, perhaps, by
communicting with the sales section of their home web sites. The compact
camera could be mounted on a microscope. It could take video at a higher
speed for a slow motion movie clip, but for a few seconds only.

--
Lin Chung
[Replace "the Water Margin" with "ntlworld" for e-mail].
Related resources
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:52:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lin Chung wrote:
> Bradley Ferguson wrote:
> > ...a digital camera...Ability to mount to a microscope....for general
> > picture taking indoors (documenting test setups, etc)...for high
> > speed (60+ FPS) video (for verifying fast motion control)...
> There is at least one digital camera out there currently in production
> satisfying your requirements. I remember reading these in the specs
> recently. It was not from one of the major camera manufacturers.
> Maybe, it was Ricoh.....


Ricoh Caplio GX8 expandability/system configurations
http://www.ricoh.com/r_dc/caplio/gx8/features/features2...

--
Lin Chung
[Replace "the Water Margin" with "ntlworld" for e-mail].
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 3:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:
> "Bradley Ferguson" <bradleyee@gmail.com> writes:
> > A good macro mode for taking pictures of small features (e.g., machined
> > parts). (The 5400 has a 0.4" macro mode, which sounds useful.)
> > Ability to mount to a microscope. For taking pictures of even smaller
> > things it would be nice to mount the camera (temporarily) to an
> > inspection microscope. (There are microscope mounts available for the
> > 5400.)
>
> Sounds like you don't need high resolution. Try a video camera.

We have a consumer video camera, which does a terrible job. The images
are very low resolution and noisy. It is also a hassle to get the
images off the camera. Perhaps you mean a commercial video camera?
Or, perhaps there are better cameras than the 4 year old Sharp from
Best Buy?

> > As mainly an aside, I also got the request for high speed (60+ FPS)
> > video (for verifying fast motion control), but I have not found
> > anything in the consumer digital camera market that offers anything
> > above 30 FPS and really do not expect to find it. Just in case, is
> > there a camera that does or will be offering such a feature?
>
> Most video cameras shoot 60 fps interlaced. There's software you
> can use to separate the odd and even fields.

Does this actually work very well? The interlacing has always been a
pain when anything moves in the image because it shows up as tearing
when watching it on a PC. I've been very disappointed with the camera,
but we don't have sufficient amount of work for the camera to justify
the cost of a real commercial/industrial camera that would produce more
useful results.

Thanks for your input
Bradley
!