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[Guide] : How to choose an Graphic Card.

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a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2012 11:58:58 PM

1- Graphic Card Briefing

Upgrading a graphic card is the second most common upgrade for a computer (adding additional memory being the most common).
Even the most undemanding user may need more graphical power, especially for newer operating systems as they introduce more graphical tricks on your desktop.
While gamers would generally get the most attention on their graphic cards and getting extremely powerful cards that can keep up for the most demanding games, they are not the only ones that would benefit from a graphic card update.

There is two main types of graphics: 2D and 3D.

Two-Dimension graphics are very familiar to everyone, from Windows GUI to word processing, web pages and videos, they are all rendered in 2D.
Everything is placed on a virtual "grid" and is then fed to the graphic card, which is later turned into a video signal that gets to your monitor.

Three-Dimensional graphics are much more complicated, that is why we need a GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) to keep up with all the rendering, especially when games utilize complex shader and lighting effects. Most current cards usually can keep up with moderately complex rendering.

However, not all 2D graphics are very simple and fast, some specialized applications for artists or graphic designers can utilize a huge amount of CPU power, even if better optimisation codes allows GPGPU computing nowadays.

GPU's are very parallel in terms of computing and would need a very fast location which it has to store information, that is why faster memory speeds on graphic cards usually increase performance, so the GPU would not need to wait for the memory.

Since most graphic intensive applications utilize the CPU and the GPU at the same time, they need a fast way to connect to each other. Most newer-generation cards use the PCI-E bus, which is the most popular. The second bus for graphic cards is the AGP bus, but it is becoming deprecated right now. A PCI bus is very old and is used only on pre-2001 graphic cards.
While the PCI standard was sufficient for most add-on cards for about a decade, it is just not fast enough for high-speed connection between the Graphic Card and the rest of the system, which can cause enormous slowdowns.

2- General 3D Briefing.

All of you guys may wonder what makes all those 3D Games really look "3D", well 3D rendering is very complicated and I can only explain the basics of it without making this guide too boring.

First, the CPU loads up the instructions and creates a 3D map where every object will be in your field of vision.
Then, the graphic card loads up and processes the vertexes, which are basically triangles for a model. Its those who make objects really look 3D, but a lack of vertexes can make a round head look cubic.
After the vertexes, the GPU puts on the Textures, which is the skin for the vertexes. Every side of an 3D object has a texture on it, otherwise it would look transparant. (just like a wireframe)
After all these had been done, you have a basic 3D scene that can be sent to the screen, but games usually add more effects.

The GPU can also process Shadows, to make the game look more realistic.
At the end, the GPU adds shader effects, which is 2D effects added after the 3D image had been rendered. Those effects are usually called "Pixel Shaders". They can add various effects to a 3D Scene like the sun glare, brokeh effects, focus effects, and much more.

3- What kind of graphic card is better for me?

"It Depends"
All other things being equal, there is no reason not to have a video card more capable than what you need. But since budget is an important factor, you need to consider just what you do need.

E-Mail and Web Surfing
This is the lowest end of computing-power usage and have very basic needs. This applies to productivity tasks like e-mail, business related world processing and spreadsheets. However, as more eye-candy and HD videos are proliferating, it can still place moderate demands on graphics.
What is needed : You will mostly need a good integrated chipset, however, a cheap, older and less powerful dedicated graphic card will provide a better overall performance.

Casual Gamers
If you don't spend a lot of time playing games, or is a gamer that does not really care about breathtaking graphics, you fall in this category.
What is needed : A new entry-level graphic card should do the trick, but if you want more insurance about performance, you may want a mid-range graphic card.

Gamers
These are the people that everyone hears about. They always get the latest cutting-edge technology and have computer power beyond the average.
What is needed : The latest and most powerful Graphic card in the High-End category, you may also want to look at dual-card options.

3D Animation, Modeling and Video Production
Applications that fall in this domain will sure benefit from a powerful graphic card, but the emphasis is different. Image quality and precision is far more important than raw speed.
What is needed : A Mid-range graphic card should suffice for amateurs, but more serious work will need a workstation class card.

Media Center
One of the popular attempted "convergence devices" of recent years is the media center PC. This can range from a computer with a normal monitor that can receive TV signals, to a central media server that can send movies to the main TV itself.
What is needed : An Entry-level graphic card with a TV Tuner card will suffice. For HD Videos, it is recommended to have a HDMI or DVI Output on the graphic card itself.

4- Software Implementations and Why should I care?

There is currently two main API's (Application Programming Interface), OpenGL and DirectX. Most people would know DirectX, since it is proprietary of Microsoft, and they largely promote it. While OpenGL is mostly Open Source and developed by the Khronos Group.
While individual programmers prefer OpenGL for its simplicity and extensibility, for the average user, both of them are very similar.

The newest DirectX version is the v11 (Direct3D 11), while the v10 and v9 are still used in some games, v8 and v7 are getting obsolete. Usually, newer is the version, better the visuals will be, and in some cases, performance improvements are to be noticed. (This applies also to OpenGL)
You should buy a DirectX 11 compatible card, as most upcoming games are DirectX 11.

OpenGL's newest version is the 4.2, while not much games use the 4.x, the v3.1 is still the most popular, and v2.1 and 1.5 are getting obsolete.

Usually supported DirectX and OpenGL versions are closely related, a DX11 card supports GL4, a DX10 card will support GL3, and so on.

5- Important Keywords and Their Meanings.

You will probably hear everyone things like : "Config Core", "Texture Mapping Unit", "Raster Operation Unit" or even "Double-precision FP Speed". Did you ever knew what those words meant? It probably didn't matter to you.
In this part, we are going to look every important word that you may need to buy a Graphic Card.

GPU : Graphic Processing Unit. A name that nVidia gave to its Graphic Processors in the late 1999's, it became so popular that it is employed now for every Graphic Card.
Transistor : A tiny component that act like an gate, a lot combined together can make powerful GPU's. Generally more there are, better it is.
Fab : The fabrication process. It is the size of each tiny transistor in the GPU. (measured in nm) Smaller is the number, the less heat the GPU will make while working.
Bus interface : It is the transportation method for the Data in your Graphic Card. Modern Graphic Cards use PCI-E, while older ones may use AGP or even PCI.
Memory : The data storage for the Graphic Card. You will generally need 1GB for mid-range graphic cards, and 2GB for high-end ones, it doesn't improve performance in any way.
Clock rate : That is the number of cycles a GPU can perform for each second. Generally it is better to have more, but more doesn't always mean better! There are other factors.
Config core : That is prehaps the most important part when looking for a Graphic Card. It is the configuration of the GPU. There is Unified Shader Unit, Texture Mapping Unit and Render Output unit.
Unified Shader Unit : Units that processes basic 3D Scenes, more is better for GPU's in the same generation. But for completely different architecture, you cannot compare directly with this.
Texture Mapping Unit : Units in the GPU that processes Textures, generally more they are, better it is.
Render Output unit : Units that add the final touch of effects on 3D Scenes and convert them into 2D Signals to be sent to the screen. More they are, better it is.
RAMDAC : Digital to analog converter that converts Digital Signals into Analogue signals to be displayed on your screen.
Fillrate : There is Pixel Fillrate and Texture Fillrate, those are the numbers of pixels or textures the Graphic Card can output in one second. Higher it is, better it is.
Memory Bandwidth : The bandwidth of the Memory Bus, larger it is, faster the card could transfer and read data from its video RAM.
Memory Bus : The type of Bus the card has. There are DDR2, DDR3, GDDR4 and GDDR5. GDDR5 is currently the fastest one. But don't take a graphic card that has a bus slower than DDR3.
Memory Bus Width : The width of the Bus, larger it is, better it is.
GFLOPS : Operations the card can process in each second (mesured in G [1G = 1,000,000,000]). Higher it is, better it is.
TDP : The power that the graphic card consumes when at peak load (everything working at 100%), lower TDP means better power saving, but at the cost of performance.

6- References that you may want to look at.

Comparison Tables
nVidia GPU Comparison Table
AMD GPU Comparison Table

Useful Tools :
Easy GPU Comparison Site
PSU Wattage Calculator

More in-depth Guides here :
How to select a video card
How to install a video card
What kind of expansion slot should you use for your video card?
Understanding video RAM memory bandwidth
How to install display drivers for your video card
The basics of 3D graphics without making your eyes glaze over - just enough to get you started
How to troubleshoot video card problems
a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2012 11:59:31 PM

AMD Card Guide

Note : nVidia Guide is in the next post.

If you want to buy a specific AMD Card, you should compare it to a nVidia Card at the same performance level first.

Pros:
Usually Cheaper than nVidia
More Power-Efficient
Less Noise
Very good at Anti Aliasing
Better RAW Performance (GPGPU)

Cons:
Poor Driver Support
Bad 2D Performance (eg. GLSL, 2D Calculations)
Less Good Video Enhancing.
Less Good Performance at OpenGL Tasks

1- Numbering Confusion

Novice users are usually very confused about Graphic Card numbering, and sometimes get tricked by the company.

The first number of AMD Cards (HD 5750, 6750, 7750) signifies its Generation, higher it is, higher the chance that your graphic card supports more complex extensions, like higher DirectX and OpenGL Versions. Note that even if your card's generation is higher, it doesn't mean better performance!

HD 2xxx, 3xxx, 4xxx = DirectX 10 + OpenGL 3.3
HD 5xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx = DirectX 11 + OpenGL 4.2 + OpenCL 1.2

The second number (HD 7570, 7670, 7750) signifies the performance rank of the graphic card. Higher it is, better will be the performance in 2D and 3D applications.

1-2 = Intergrated Chipsets, you won't be able to buy them. They are chipsets soldered in your motherboard. (eg. HD 6250, 6290)
Note that the HD 3300, 6310 and 6320 are the only intergrated cards that have a "3" as the second number and does not fall into the next category.
3-4 = Low Level cards, only suitable for 2D applications and are just a little more performant than Intergrated GPU's. (eg. HD 7350, 7450)
5-6 = Entry Level cards, suitable for playing games with medium settings at 720p. Not very performant for heavy 3D Modeling. (eg. HD 7570, 7670)
7-8 = Mid-Range cards, suitable for True HD (1080p) gaming at high settings. (eg. HD 7750, 7870)
9 = High-End cards, suitable for Multi-Screen (Eyefinity) gaming at ultra settings. (eg. HD 7970)

Note that any card below the HD 7750 (eg. HD 7570, 7670) are re-branded 6xxx cards. They are the same card.

Graphic cards that finishes with a "D" is the new APU from AMD, those are integrated into the CPU and are better than Integrated Chipsets, but compares less well to dedicated cards.

The third number (HD 6570, 6670, 6750) is a performance rank between cards that have the same second number. Higher is the number, better will be the performance.

Please note that when the 2nd and 3rd number are all "9"s, it usually means that those are Enthusiast Cards, those cards have dual-gpu's in the same PCB and should offer twice the performance. (eg. HD 7990)
An exception is the HD 5970, which is dual-gpu. And for older cards (HD 4xxx and older), dual gpu cards have a x2 suffix.

As for now, the fourth and last number is currently unused by AMD and is always a "0".

2- Power Consumption and PSU choice

AMD usually recommends a wattage far superior that what is really needed, since most people have a no-name PSU with bad power efficiency and cheap quality.
It is recommended to buy at least from a branded company like FSP or Seasonic.
But if you really want a good quality and lasting PSU, choose some reputable brands like Corsair, Thermaltake or Antec.

Here is a table that tells you the average required power supply for each card.
Please note that AMD cards with the 2nd number lower or equal to "6" does not require a 6-Pin connector.
Also, a graphic card that is not in the same generation but with the same performance level consumes a very similar amount of power. (eg. 4670, 5670, 6670)

HD 6250 to 6320 - Any power supply will work since Integrated Chipsets does not consume a lot of power.
HD 7350 to 7670 - 250W to 300W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise, 400W is recommended.
HD 7750 ------- - 300W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise 500W is recommended.
HD 7770 to 7850 - 400W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise 500W is recommended.
HD 7870 to 7970 - 500W good quality PSU Recommended.
HD 7990 ------- - 600W good quality PSU Recommended.

3- Special Features

There are special features like EyeFinity, UVD, PowerPlay, etc. Keep an eye on those features if you need them. Features are usually listed by the seller.
a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2012 11:59:44 PM

nVidia Card Guide

If you want to buy a specific nVidia Card, you should compare it to an AMD Card at the same performance level first.

Pros:
Very Good Driver Support
CUDA Support + PhysX
More Aimed at High-End users
Very Good at 2D Tasks
Extraordinary OpenGL Performance

Cons:
More Power-Hungry
Produces More Noise than its AMD Counterparts
Not Very Good at DirectCompute (eg. HLSL)

1- Numbering Confusion

Novice users are usually very confused about Graphic Card numbering, and sometimes get tricked by the company.

The first number of nVidia Cards (340, 460, 560) signifies its Generation, higher it is, higher the chance that your graphic card supports more complex extensions, like higher DirectX and OpenGL Versions. Note that even if your card's generation is higher, it doesn't mean better performance!

2xx, 3xx = DirectX 10 + OpenGL 3.3
4xx, 5xx = DirectX 11 + OpenGL 4.2 + OpenCL 1.1

The second number (520, 560, 580) signifies the performance rank of the graphic card. Higher it is, better will be the performance in 2D and 3D applications.
nVidia also add a prefix and a suffix to their cards. GT prefix is for entry-level, GTS is for mid-range, and GTX is for mid-range and high-end cards. The Ti suffix is usually for an ameliorated version of the same card.

1-2 = Low Level cards, only suitable for 2D applications and are just a little more performant than Intergrated GPU's. (eg. GT 510, 520)
3-4 = Entry Level cards, suitable for playing games with medium settings at 720p. Not very performant for heavy 3D Modeling. (eg. GT 530, 545)
5-6 = Mid-Range cards, suitable for True HD (1080p) gaming at high settings. (eg. GTS 450, GTX 560)
7-8 = High-End cards, suitable for Multi-Screen (3D Surround) gaming at ultra settings. (eg. GTX 480, GTX 580)
9 = Dual-GPU cards, suitable for Multi-Screen (3D Surround) gaming at ultra settings and Very High AA levels. (eg. GTX 590)

P.S. nVidia releases the most powerful cards first and then does some lower-end cards afterwards. This ends up making lower-end cards that has better features and smaller architecture than the higher cards. (But does not mean that lower-end cards are more powerful!)

The third and last number (550, 555) is a performance rank between cards that have the same second number. Higher is the number, better will be the performance.

2- Power Consumption and PSU choice

nVidia usually recommends a wattage far superior that what is really needed, since most people have a no-name PSU with bad power efficiency and cheap quality.
It is recommended to buy at least from a branded company like FSP or Seasonic.
But if you really want a good quality and lasting PSU, choose some reputable brands like Corsair, Thermaltake or Antec.

Here is a table that tells you the average required power supply for each card.
Please note that nVidia cards with the 2nd number lower or equal to "4" does not require a 6-Pin connector.
Also, a graphic card that is not in the same generation but with the same performance level consumes a very similar amount of power. (eg. GT 240, 440, 545)

GT 510 to 545 -- 250W to 300W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise, 400W is recommended.
GTX 550 to 555 - 400W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise 500W is recommended.
GTX 560 to 580 - 500W good quality PSU Recommended.
GTX 590 ------ - 600W good quality PSU Recommended.

3- Special Features

There are special features like 3D Surround, PureVideo, etc. Keep an eye on those features if you need them. Features are usually listed by the seller.
Related resources
a c 271 U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 12:05:13 AM

So the 6990 is widely regarded as a quiet card is it? :lol: 
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 12:08:25 AM

No it isn't really quiet with its large fan... But generally speaking, AMD cards are better at power consumption and less noise levels... :\
a c 271 U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 12:12:04 AM

Apart from the ones that are really loud and quite power hungry, some of the 4xxx series and the 5970's spring to mind for some reason. :whistle: 
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 12:14:56 AM

Mousemonkey said:
Apart from the ones that are really loud and quite power hungry, some of the 4xxx series and the 5970's spring to mind for some reason. :whistle: 


? I didn't really understand you well... But what I tried to say is that AMD cards are "generally" quieter than their nVidia counterparts, this is proven in some benchmarks...
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 1:11:47 AM

Nice guide, it's well done and aside from your AMD/ATI sig i couldn't tell if you are bias towards one company or the other!
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 1:13:24 AM

grammar check? there's a lot of 'an' that should be 'a', other than that I think this is a pretty good primer for those who are just learning.
LOL, even knowing about the AMD numbering scheme I still find it damnably unfathomable when trying to research a card. I find that I often find it easier to check the nVidia cards, then look at the benchmarks for the AMD 'equivalent' and suggest that.
Perhaps add some primers on what types of performance to expect? I know a lot of people building workstations and productivity rigs think that they need a big GPU, but either their software doesn't support the card, or else CPU would be just as fast as GPU rendering in the first palce and the money should best be spent on a larger CPU, more Ram, or a RAID array. This is especially true with Adobe Premiere and the CUDA rendering with the Mercury Engine. Lots of people get a mid-range nVidia card thinking it will help them, but in reality it causes all kinds of problems if you use anything less than a GTX 480 or 570. Plus many titles only support AMD or nVidia, which makes card selection for workstations a particular pain if they have one title that supports one, and another title that supports the other. Sure, you could purchase 2 cards... but that gets expensive really quick!
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 1:20:11 AM

CaedenV said:
grammar check? there's a lot of 'an' that should be 'a'...


Oops totally forgot about that. Corrected. :) 
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 7:01:38 PM

No more comments for errors or grammar that I omitted?
a c 271 U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 7:08:00 PM

I'm still waiting for all the ATi/AMD fans to agree that the drivers are crap, especially all those who reckon they've never had any problems at all. ;) 
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 7:39:26 PM

Mousemonkey said:
I'm still waiting for all the ATi/AMD fans to agree that the drivers are crap, especially all those who reckon they've never had any problems at all. ;) 


Yep, I am having numerous issues right now, each time that I change resolution, CCC changes to Underscan and it makes everything look ugly. Also, every time, CCC just don't want to open.

I am not talking about other many issues like services stopping, driver crashing etc... The drivers got poor OpenGL support and it performs less well in those games. :( 
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2012 8:13:09 PM

Mousemonkey said:
I'm still waiting for all the ATi/AMD fans to agree that the drivers are crap, especially all those who reckon they've never had any problems at all. ;) 


Nvidia spammer :lol:  .

I wish AMD drivers had less issues.

a b U Graphics card
February 3, 2012 12:10:51 AM

Lol, he is no spammer, he is an moderator...

But maby he is an nVidia fan?
a c 175 U Graphics card
February 3, 2012 5:04:08 AM

Mr. Mousmonkey is always nVidia...
a b U Graphics card
February 3, 2012 6:16:30 PM

Then he should change since it isn't one company that is better than the other, each has its own advantages and disadvantages...

AMD = HLSL
nVidia = GLSL
a c 271 U Graphics card
February 3, 2012 6:50:06 PM

bloc97 said:
Then he should change since it isn't one company that is better than the other, each has its own advantages and disadvantages...

AMD = HLSL
nVidia = GLSL

I prefer Nvidia cards and drivers, who are you to tell me to change preferences?
a c 175 U Graphics card
February 4, 2012 3:05:44 AM

Their drivers are not buggy like the 4xxx or 5xxx series anymore, but I know nVidia drivers are still better. In my opinion AMD driver are not 'crap', they are just worse than nVidia.

Anyway. I'd just leave this arguing. Thanks Bloc97 to make this guide, it's going to be helpful for some people.
March 10, 2012 8:40:16 PM

Great guide! Now I know I don't need a 7950 to run BF3 on HIGH (not ULTRA) settings. :) 
a b U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 8:47:55 PM

Updated the guide, tell me what you guys think of this. :) 
a b U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 9:13:56 PM

Make this sticky? Dunno how. :( 
Prehaps it is moderators that do it...
March 10, 2012 9:21:24 PM

Great guide! I am getting a Radeon 7950 now instead, regardless of what I said earlier. :p 
I want to run eyefinity soon and 2 7950s work well on it.
a b U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 9:27:32 PM

azeem40 said:
Great guide! I am getting a Radeon 7950 now instead, regardless of what I said earlier. :p 
I want to run eyefinity soon and 2 7950s work well on it.

Thats great! :) .
Only if I had the money, I would've bought the 7950... :cry:  Lucky you... :D 
March 10, 2012 9:35:09 PM

I am getting the Sapphire OCed version from Tigerdirect. It is $70 cheaper than on Amazon. :p 
a b U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 9:40:01 PM

You can try Newegg (.ca, .com or .cn) if you live in those countries.
Newegg always had the best prices.
March 10, 2012 10:05:03 PM

Sadly, the OCed Sapphire is deactivated on newegg.
a b U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 10:06:55 PM

Oh... That's sad... :( 
Why does Newegg desactivates stuff...
March 10, 2012 10:08:35 PM

When it was in stock, the SAPPHIRE OCed version was $450.
January 3, 2013 8:26:43 AM

bloc97 said:
AMD Card Guide

7-8 = Mid-Range cards, suitable for True HD (1080p) gaming at high settings. (eg. HD 7750, 7870)
.


i'm thinking of buying an AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Video Card, would this be enough to use with 2 1080p 23" screens? and if not what should i buy?

tnx for your time this post really helped me out.
May 24, 2013 9:05:00 AM

bloc97 said:
nVidia Card Guide

If you want to buy a specific nVidia Card, you should compare it to an AMD Card at the same performance level first.

Pros:
Very Good Driver Support
CUDA Support + PhysX
More Aimed at High-End users
Very Good at 2D Tasks
Extraordinary OpenGL Performance

Cons:
More Power-Hungry
Produces More Noise than its AMD Counterparts
Not Very Good at DirectCompute (eg. HLSL)

1- Numbering Confusion

Novice users are usually very confused about Graphic Card numbering, and sometimes get tricked by the company.

The first number of nVidia Cards (340, 460, 560) signifies its Generation, higher it is, higher the chance that your graphic card supports more complex extensions, like higher DirectX and OpenGL Versions. Note that even if your card's generation is higher, it doesn't mean better performance!

2xx, 3xx = DirectX 10 + OpenGL 3.3
4xx, 5xx = DirectX 11 + OpenGL 4.2 + OpenCL 1.1

The second number (520, 560, 580) signifies the performance rank of the graphic card. Higher it is, better will be the performance in 2D and 3D applications.
nVidia also add a prefix and a suffix to their cards. GT prefix is for entry-level, GTS is for mid-range, and GTX is for mid-range and high-end cards. The Ti suffix is usually for an ameliorated version of the same card.

1-2 = Low Level cards, only suitable for 2D applications and are just a little more performant than Intergrated GPU's. (eg. GT 510, 520)
3-4 = Entry Level cards, suitable for playing games with medium settings at 720p. Not very performant for heavy 3D Modeling. (eg. GT 530, 545)
5-6 = Mid-Range cards, suitable for True HD (1080p) gaming at high settings. (eg. GTS 450, GTX 560)
7-8 = High-End cards, suitable for Multi-Screen (3D Surround) gaming at ultra settings. (eg. GTX 480, GTX 580)
9 = Dual-GPU cards, suitable for Multi-Screen (3D Surround) gaming at ultra settings and Very High AA levels. (eg. GTX 590)

P.S. nVidia releases the most powerful cards first and then does some lower-end cards afterwards. This ends up making lower-end cards that has better features and smaller architecture than the higher cards. (But does not mean that lower-end cards are more powerful!)

The third and last number (550, 555) is a performance rank between cards that have the same second number. Higher is the number, better will be the performance.

2- Power Consumption and PSU choice

nVidia usually recommends a wattage far superior that what is really needed, since most people have a no-name PSU with bad power efficiency and cheap quality.
It is recommended to buy at least from a branded company like FSP or Seasonic.
But if you really want a good quality and lasting PSU, choose some reputable brands like Corsair, Thermaltake or Antec.

Here is a table that tells you the average required power supply for each card.
Please note that nVidia cards with the 2nd number lower or equal to "4" does not require a 6-Pin connector.
Also, a graphic card that is not in the same generation but with the same performance level consumes a very similar amount of power. (eg. GT 240, 440, 545)

GT 510 to 545 -- 250W to 300W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise, 400W is recommended.
GTX 550 to 555 - 400W good quality PSU Recommended, otherwise 500W is recommended.
GTX 560 to 580 - 500W good quality PSU Recommended.
GTX 590 ------ - 600W good quality PSU Recommended.

3- Special Features

There are special features like 3D Surround, PureVideo, etc. Keep an eye on those features if you need them. Features are usually listed by the seller.


May 24, 2013 9:07:36 AM

But you didn't tell about gtx 660 & 660ti's PSU requirement ...!
Plz post your answer....
thanks in advance...:) 
!