Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

G2 sell and buy G6 worth it?

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 12:53:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have a G2 that I have been happy with, along with a 550EX flash.

I'd appreciate any help in deciding if a G6 would be much better,
newer better features, and so on.

Thanks.

Luce Powells

More about : sell buy worth

Anonymous
June 18, 2005 1:16:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Luce Powells a écrit :
> I have a G2 that I have been happy with, along with a 550EX flash.
>
> I'd appreciate any help in deciding if a G6 would be much better,
> newer better features, and so on.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Luce Powells

Hi Luce,
I own a G3, and really don't want to change for a G6. Better features
are IMHO only about working speed, as the millions pixels more are not
quite relevant for most pictures. If you ave to change, go to the A
serie (A95, A520,...) for compacts, or for a real enhancement, to a
reflex as the EOS 350D, where you can find a zero-time response delay,
an immediate auto-focus, an ISO sensitivity up to 1600. What you will
loose, is the unique twist-and-tilt rear screen wich is so useful, as a
reflex cannot display the before-shot image on the screen. The last
con- is that your G2 will have a near-zero reselling value.... ;-( So
keep it and buy a 350D !
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 4:00:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have a G2 as well, and have never felt compelled to buy the G6, in
part because with a lot of point-and-shoot shots I never even use it at
full 4Mpixl resolution! Snapshots sent in emails work just fine at the
lower resolution. And the G2/G3 set the standard for other cameras for
image quality and lack of color fringes, etc. The G5 and G6 took a bit
of a step backward for color fringes, in the trade off of more pixels.
I just bought a 20D, because as a long time photographer who is
accustomed to manual film SLRs, I was tired of the shutter lag of
digital P&S, and I also wanted a wider range of focal lengths afforded
by interchangeable lenses. The greater pixel count, which I need for
this different style and needs of shooting (sports photos, event
photos) rather than snapshots, dictates my decision of DSLR rather than
higher pixel count P&S.
Consider your needs, and the size and bulk and weight of your choice,
in deciding. A reasonable entry DSLR with 6Mpixel is the Canon Rebel
300T, a nice 8Mpixel more advanced entry level is Canon 350T, a
prosumer DSLR is the 20D (and don't think about the 1Ds MkII unless you
are wealthy or a pro whose business use can write off the expense of
$8k for lens and camera!).
Related resources
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 4:00:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have a G2 as well, and have never felt compelled to buy the G6, in
part because with a lot of point-and-shoot shots I never even use it at
full 4Mpixl resolution! Snapshots sent in emails work just fine at the
lower resolution. And the G2/G3 set the standard for other cameras for
image quality and lack of color fringes, etc. The G5 and G6 took a bit
of a step backward for color fringes, in the trade off of more pixels.
I just bought a 20D, because as a long time photographer who is
accustomed to manual film SLRs, I was tired of the shutter lag of
digital P&S, and I also wanted a wider range of focal lengths afforded
by interchangeable lenses. The greater pixel count, which I need for
this different style and needs of shooting (sports photos, event
photos) rather than snapshots, dictates my decision of DSLR rather than
higher pixel count P&S.
Consider your needs, and the size and bulk and weight of your choice,
in deciding. A reasonable entry DSLR with 6Mpixel is the Canon Rebel
300T, a nice 8Mpixel more advanced entry level is Canon 350T, a
prosumer DSLR is the 20D (and don't think about the 1Ds MkII unless you
are wealthy or a pro whose business use can write off the expense of
$8k for lens and camera!).
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 4:00:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have a G2 as well, and have never felt compelled to buy the G6, in
part because with a lot of point-and-shoot shots I never even use it at
full 4Mpixl resolution! Snapshots sent in emails work just fine at the
lower resolution. And the G2/G3 set the standard for other cameras for
image quality and lack of color fringes, etc. The G5 and G6 took a bit
of a step backward for color fringes, in the trade off of more pixels.
I just bought a 20D, because as a long time photographer who is
accustomed to manual film SLRs, I was tired of the shutter lag of
digital P&S, and I also wanted a wider range of focal lengths afforded
by interchangeable lenses. The greater pixel count, which I need for
this different style and needs of shooting (sports photos, event
photos) rather than snapshots, dictates my decision of DSLR rather than
higher pixel count P&S.
Consider your needs, and the size and bulk and weight of your choice,
in deciding. A reasonable entry DSLR with 6Mpixel is the Canon Rebel
300T, a nice 8Mpixel more advanced entry level is Canon 350T, a
prosumer DSLR is the 20D (and don't think about the 1Ds MkII unless you
are wealthy or a pro whose business use can write off the expense of
$8k for lens and camera!).
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:21:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 18 Jun 2005 12:00:35 -0700, "wilt" <wiltw@aol.com> wrote:

>I have a G2 as well, and have never felt compelled to buy the G6, in
>part because with a lot of point-and-shoot shots I never even use it at
>full 4Mpixl resolution! Snapshots sent in emails work just fine at the
>lower resolution. And the G2/G3 set the standard for other cameras for
>image quality and lack of color fringes, etc. The G5 and G6 took a bit
>of a step backward for color fringes, in the trade off of more pixels.
>I just bought a 20D, because as a long time photographer who is
>accustomed to manual film SLRs, I was tired of the shutter lag of
>digital P&S, and I also wanted a wider range of focal lengths afforded
>by interchangeable lenses. The greater pixel count, which I need for
>this different style and needs of shooting (sports photos, event
>photos) rather than snapshots, dictates my decision of DSLR rather than
>higher pixel count P&S.
>Consider your needs, and the size and bulk and weight of your choice,
>in deciding. A reasonable entry DSLR with 6Mpixel is the Canon Rebel
>300T, a nice 8Mpixel more advanced entry level is Canon 350T, a
>prosumer DSLR is the 20D (and don't think about the 1Ds MkII unless you
>are wealthy or a pro whose business use can write off the expense of
>$8k for lens and camera!).

Thank you Wilt for a great answer. The 350 D (Rebel XT) is a very nice
camera. And of course so is the 20D, which I naturally prefer even
more. ; ) And is not outrageously priced. May I ask which lenses you
use with your 20D? I have a EX550 flash which is wonderful so I would
like to stay with Canons. I do many panorama shots of landscapes, so
like to have a decent wide lens,, but also would like to have a 150 mm
long lens (35 mm equivalent) as well. Canon IS is appealing, but so
pricey.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 with 12X optical stabilization is quite
appealing, and under six hundred dollars. Great pics from what I see
in the online galleries and reviews.

Luce
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:27:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 18 Jun 2005 09:16:26 -0700, "Madrunner" <madrunner@skynet.be>
wrote:

>
>
>Luce Powells a écrit :
>> I have a G2 that I have been happy with, along with a 550EX flash.
>>
>> I'd appreciate any help in deciding if a G6 would be much better,
>> newer better features, and so on.
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Luce Powells
>
>Hi Luce,
>I own a G3, and really don't want to change for a G6. Better features
>are IMHO only about working speed, as the millions pixels more are not
>quite relevant for most pictures. If you ave to change, go to the A
>serie (A95, A520,...) for compacts, or for a real enhancement, to a
>reflex as the EOS 350D, where you can find a zero-time response delay,
>an immediate auto-focus, an ISO sensitivity up to 1600. What you will
>loose, is the unique twist-and-tilt rear screen wich is so useful, as a
>reflex cannot display the before-shot image on the screen. The last
>con- is that your G2 will have a near-zero reselling value.... ;-( So
>keep it and buy a 350D !

Thank you for the good advice. I'll keep it.

I really like the twistable LCD because I can often get shots with the
camera hanging at my waist while not appearing to be taking pictures,
because the cupped left hand covers the display. I get subjects
appearing more natural that way, same as using an old Rollieflex at
the waist. The 350D is appealing all right. It's those extra lenses
that add up $$ fast. I wish my G2 had that extra reach at the long end
that the later modesl have, and VGA movie size for the video clips.
..
Luce
June 19, 2005 8:16:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Getting more pixels is not just about the pixels you use, but about the
ones you don't use as well. When I got my new Canon G6 I thought would
use a middle resolution setting. I quickly changed that to maximum
resolution.

The reason is cropping. With more pixels you have more liberty to crop
and still have enough resolution for any size print. This in turn means
that every shot has more potential for producing one or more winning
prints.

I have used the G6's twist-able display in so many ways, I now can't
imagine being without it.
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 2:51:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<< May I ask which lenses you
use with your 20D? >>

10-20mm, 17-85mm, 70-200mm, 1.4x extender

So I have full range of 10-280 (or 15-420 in 35mm format)
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 1:42:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Luce Powells <LP99@nospam.com> writes:

> I have a G2 that I have been happy with, along with a 550EX flash.
>
> I'd appreciate any help in deciding if a G6 would be much better,
> newer better features, and so on.

I can't imagine it is all that worth it unless you have a need for the
higher resolution and perhaps lower noise at higher ISO's. Getting
into a Digital Rebel to use with the 550EX though may give you some
more flexibility if you have the itch to buy something or take your
photography to the next leve.

I have a G2 and the 300D and love having the pair (not to mention
sharing memory and batteries between them--note though, the RebelXT
uses a diffent battery). The Rebel 300D gets me the shot when I have
situations where the shutter lag of the point and shoots just won't
work at all, and the G2 is the portable camera that takes fabulous
flash exposures with a fast f/2.0 lens (albeit is insanely top heavy
with the 550EX on top)!

Best Regards,
--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net/
!