CPU fan bumps, doesn't boot

First of all, I'm not sure exactly if this is the correct place. I've read the stickies, and don't see any conflicting information so I'll assume this is.

I'm putting together a new build. The build is:

i3 2130
ga-z68xp-ud3
flex 6870
g.skill ripjaws ddr3 1600mhz 1.5v 2x4gb ram
64gb crucial m4
corsair vx550
nzxt source 210 elite

I was breadboarding the motherboard on the box. I connected the 24pin and 8pin connectors into their correct places on the motherboard. I seated the RAM correctly in the correct slots. I also seated the CPU and HSF correctly and hooked up the HSF to the 4pin header marked. I looked over all of these aspects at least 3 more times after the initial start up didn't work.

When I short the power pins on the board, the CPU fan will bump a little (maybe a 1\8th rotation) after the phase LED lights flash on. The PSU fan will start spooling and then after 4 or 5 seconds it will repeat the process. I lifted the motherboard off the cardboard holding the HSF and tried to boot it incase the surface was shorting out the back of the motherboard but it didn't help.

It does exactly the same thing, whether I have 2, 1 or no memory DIMMs inserted. At this point, I'm going to assume I have a DOA part. I took every precaution on this build, including grounding myself every time I touched any component.

Also, a speaker didn't come with this motherboard so I can't tell what's wrong with it.

Any suggestions? At the moment, I have the HSF, CPU and RAM still installed on the board sitting inside the antistatic bag awaiting any ideas. Any help is welcome and much appreciated. Thanks.
12 answers Last reply
More about bumps doesn boot
  1. Is this a stock fan you are using?
  2. ngrego said:
    Is this a stock fan you are using?


    Yeah mate, I should've clarified this sorry.
  3. Can I try to plug the CPU fan into a case fan header? Will it hurt any component? I think the case fan headers have the same layout of pins, but a lesser amount.

    Edit: I looked up online and I found out I could do it without causing harm to components, as long as I let the fan controller socket overhang instead of the ground socket.

    Anyway, I did it. It instead bumps a little, then does a rotation, then a bump and then stops. It'll do that again once the cycle starts again, in time with the phase leds. Does this help at all?
  4. I'm pretty sure that the case fan header is controlled differently than the cpu fan header. The case fan header may not start immediately (4pin), so once you turn on your pc it may wait until the heat builds up. 4 pin fans have 2 pins for power, 1 pin for sensor (senses if a fan is connected) and 1 control pin. So if your fan has a control pin on the case header it may not spin until it needs to extract heat. As far as I know almost all cpu fans use 4 pins. If you connect it to a 3 pin header it should spin continuously.
  5. ngrego said:
    I'm pretty sure that the case fan header is controlled differently than the cpu fan header. The case fan header may not start immediately (4pin), so once you turn on your pc it may wait until the heat builds up. 4 pin fans have 2 pins for power, 1 pin for sensor (senses if a fan is connected) and 1 control pin. So if your fan has a control pin on the case header it may not spin until it needs to extract heat. As far as I know almost all cpu fans use 4 pins. If you connect it to a 3 pin header it should spin continuously.


    Yeah, I read that as well. There's a 4 pin header for a case fan, and a 3 pin header for another case fan. The 3 pin header misses the fan control socket, so the fan is running at full rpm the entire time. This was still not the case when I plugged the CPU fan into the 3 pin header though. The CPU fan twitched a little (without fan control plugged in) more than usual, but ultimately failed.

    I also plugged a case fan into the CPU fan header since I thought the pins might have bent, or the header might be defective but the case fans spin fine. I live in NZ so it's too difficult for me to get a replacement cooler locally to test if definitely is a defective fan, so I think I'll get a new HSF\CPU under warranty. You think that'll do the trick? The only problem is, if it is the motherboard that's the problem, by the time I get a new HSF\CPU the DOA warranty will have run out I believe.
  6. Have you tried reseating the CPU it is common on new builds if it is off just a hair for the fans to bump and no boot some times, depending on how ticky the board is it can take 2-3 seats to get it just right. I build a lot of custom systems and have had to reseat many a times before.
  7. Yeah, I reseated it about 4 or 5 times. The key holes on the side of the cpu matches up with the board. I may try to reseat it again.

    Is there any other way to check if the CPU fan is buggered?
  8. Sadly not within any of our price ranges that I know of without getting into at least bios.
  9. UPDATE:

    The thermal paste looked like it was spreading to one side unevenly when I removed the HSF so I shifted the CPU slightly. I'm still getting the same problem when I plug into the proper 4 pin CPU fan header or the 4 pin system fan header. HOWEVER, when I plug the CPU fan into the 3 pin system fan header it lives at full RPM. Obviously, the 3 pin headers lack a fan control pin so does this still indicate a faulty fan since both 4 pin headers give the same problem?

    Thanks.
  10. UPDATE:

    Ok, this is strange. The CPU fan will work in the CPU fan header (it'll twitch once, and then on the second loop it'll start up and work flawlessly until I turn off the power) IF I plug in 1 or 2 sticks of RAM into either or both of the 2 memory slots CLOSEST to the edge of the motherboard. I'm assuming the computer will boot since it stops looping and the CPU fan will continuously run, but I'm breadboarding it on my table so I can't hook it up to my LCD TV in my room to check.

    HOWEVER, IF I use EITHER or BOTH of the memory slots closest to the HSF\CPU, it won't boot. What problem would this indicate? Something wrong with the motherboard?

    I appreciate the help guys.
  11. Do you mean that when you turn off the power it wont boot up again?

    When installing two identical sticks of ram (two channel) they have to be installed on same colored slots (blue or white).

    I also have a Gigabyte mobo and have also installed a few builds on them in the past. I have seen this 'reaction' before caused by an incompatible cpu or ram. If you can manage to boot try installing the latest BIOS incase it is something similar in your case. As the CPU support list shows, for the i3 2130 BIOS ver. F3 must be installed (at least). I would install latest (F9) to be on the safe side.
  12. ngrego said:
    Do you mean that when you turn off the power it wont boot up again?

    When installing two identical sticks of ram (two channel) they have to be installed on same colored slots (blue or white).

    I also have a Gigabyte mobo and have also installed a few builds on them in the past. I have seen this 'reaction' before caused by an incompatible cpu or ram. If you can manage to boot try installing the latest BIOS incase it is something similar in your case. As the CPU support list shows, for the i3 2130 BIOS ver. F3 must be installed (at least). I would install latest (F9) to be on the safe side.


    Sorry mate, I had a newer thread which I posted the result.
    The computer would only boot when the sticks were in the same channel (different colours), running in single channel mode. I put the computer together anyway, installed everything and then RMA'd the board a few days later. I wanted to fiddle around on my new PC before replacing the board. It just seemed to be the two memory slots in the channel next to the CPU socket were buggered. 1 stick of RAM in either of those slots would cause a fail boot. So yeah, I sent it off the other day and should be getting a reply soon.

    Thanks for replying anyway.
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