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[Hybrid Crossfire] Yea or nay?

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  • Radeon
  • Crossfire
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 5, 2012 6:35:35 PM

I've built a new system using a Phenom II X4 955BE on a Gigabyte 890GPA-UD3H motherboard. This board has an IGP equivalent to a Radeon 4290 on-die. I also have an HIS Radeon HD5770 IceQ 5 card. My question: how much is there to gain by pairing the two (4290 + 5770) together via Hybrid Crossfire?

There's a compatibility chart, made by AMD, showing the 890GX's chipset as "recommended" with a 5450, 5550, 5570 and 5670... but not the 5770 (or any card above it, for that matter).

Even if there were only a performance gain of, say, 10%, I'd like to use this -- if only to be able to say I did. What do you think?

More about : hybrid crossfire yea nay

February 5, 2012 6:45:29 PM

If the AMD chart shows that the 5770 is not recomended then my guess is that it probably wont work or make a difference.
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February 5, 2012 6:47:21 PM

It probably couldn't be done and if it could it wouldn't improve performance, it might even decrease performance. The 4290 is slower than the 5450 and the 5550 is probably around three times faster than the 5450. The 5770 is probably at least three times as fast as the 5550.

Point is even if it did work and did improve performance it would indistinguishable gains.

Also, the IGPs on a motherboard are referred to as on-board, not on-die. On-die would mean it's a part of the CPU like Intel's IGPs or AMD Llano's IGPs.

If you want performance improvements you could get another 5770. It would be pretty cheap, probably well under $80 USD.
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February 6, 2012 1:53:47 AM

blazorthon said:
It probably couldn't be done and if it could it wouldn't improve performance, it might even decrease performance. The 4290 is slower than the 5450 and the 5550 is probably around three times faster than the 5450. The 5770 is probably at least three times as fast as the 5550. Point is even if it did work and did improve performance it would indistinguishable gains.
I ran across the 'Hybrid' setting in my BIOS while setting it up yesterday, which prompted me to ask this question.

Just trying to envision all these models, generations and sub-versions is difficult, at best. I've also read that just having a board with IGP, versus an equivalent one without, hurts the overall performance by 10%. Of course, I found that after I had already cut off the UPC for the rebate. :heink: 

blazorthon said:
Also, the IGPs on a motherboard are referred to as on-board, not on-die. On-die would mean it's a part of the CPU like Intel's IGPs or AMD Llano's IGPs.
You are correct, sir. I shouldn't have used that term, I do know the difference. Mea culpa....

blazorthon said:
If you want performance improvements you could get another 5770. It would be pretty cheap, probably well under $80 USD.
This is true, although being the perfectionist I am, I'd want an identical one. I believe the HIS comes overclocked, that's a start.

Thanks! :sol: 
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February 6, 2012 2:47:38 AM

Best answer selected by Trocon.
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February 6, 2012 3:04:17 AM

Glad to help. I figured you knew about the difference between on-die and on-board, but it seemed worth mentioning. Sorry, but I can be nit-picky about this stuff.

Here's to hoping you find an identical card, it could happen.
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February 6, 2012 10:47:25 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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