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Question on decreasing camera shake at high zoom

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Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:29:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
photography/sporting events).

Any help/tips are welcome.

--
Some days, my brain hurts...

Where do they come from, and why won't they go back?
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:29:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 20:29:45 -0500, Brad Sims <bsims@abnt.org> wrote:

>I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
>however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
>on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
>I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
>with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
>photography/sporting events).
>
>Any help/tips are welcome.

Tripod use is a good sugestion.
Also, breath control can be tried; some find taking a breath and
holding it works well, others (myself included) find taking a deep
breath and then letting it out, then shooting, helps more.
Less zoom is good, as is resting the camera on anything stable; a tree
limb or trunk, for example.
A trick that's been around for a long time is to fashion a chain
monopod from a length of chain, fastened to a lashup ending in a bolt
that fits in the tripod mount on the bottom of your camera. Let the
chain drop to the ground, step on the end, and pull up on the camera
(not too much - you don't want to damage anything!). You'll find this
helps to steady the camera, and isn't as bulky as a monopod/tripod.
Anything you can do to steady the camera is fair game. (Well, that one
lady did complain... but that's a different story!)

--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 2:00:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims:
> I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
> I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
> with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
> photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.

My late grandfather, who was active in photography from the late 19th
century to the mid 20th century, advocated use of a tripod.

Davoud

--
usenet *at* davidillig dawt com
Related resources
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 2:21:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims <bsims@abnt.org> writes:

> I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
> I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
> with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
> photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.

There's a whole panoply of techniques for hand-holding more steadily.

Plus a bunch of techniques that aren't just "hand" holding, of
course.

Tripod -- pretty much the steadiest way to support your camera

Monopod -- pretty much eliminated movement in two of three dimensions

Beanbag -- on top of something the right height, or pressed sideways
against a stable vertical surface, I've easily gotten 5-second
exposures without anything big or heavy. A beanbag lives in my camera
bag full-time. Even without a beanbag, you can sometimes just set the
camera on the table.

Mini-tripods, clamp-on tripods, etc

Leaning on things. If I lean on a stone wall while carefully holding
the camera, I can shoot up to 1/2 sec sometimes. Sitting down and
leaning on things. Sitting on the ground and raising one knee to
support the camera. Generally, pulling your arms *in* rather than
having them sticking out makes for stabler positions.

"Sling". Special camera straps, or special ways of using regular
camera straps, can give you great additional stability. For example,
strap around your neck, elbows in your belly, hands holding the camera
pushing it out against the strap is *much* more stable than holding it
up to your head. You can't see through most optical viewfinders in
this mode, but it's *great* for digitals that have an LCD preview on
the back. The general idea is to create tension and triangular braced
structures to tie the camera to as much of your body-mass as
possible. (The freehand rifle technique using the sling is related to
this class of techniques, too.)

Drop chain/string. Attach a flexible but not too elastic
cord-type-thingy to a tripod screw. Screw the screw into the cameras
tripod socket. Drop the cord to the ground. Step on it. Pull up
against the cord. This is a lot like a monopod in reverse.

Breath control. Take a deep breath, let half of it out, and gently
squeeze the trigger...er, I mean, shutter release. (Yes, another
shooting technique applicable to photography. The problems are the
same -- holding a device steady while aiming in a precise direction
and pushing a button.) And that "squeeze" is important; don't "push".

Also, in digital, things that will get you about 1 shot in 10 are
useful, *if* the shot you want repeats a lot. All the wasted shots
can be deleted, and with preview you can tell in the field if you got
it or not. You can do that to some extent with film, too, but the
cost does enter into it, and not knowing if you've got the shot or not
does too.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 5:34:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims wrote:
>I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat,
> but I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out
> will help with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than
> 12X (nature photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.

Tripod?

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 6:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims wrote:
> I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
> I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
> with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
> photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.
>

Tripod. Monopod.
ANY kind of stable base for the camera, such as a handy tree to press it
against, or other stable support (rock, building, etc.). Faster shutter
speed, wider aperture.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 6:09:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 22:00:43 -0400, Davoud <star@sky.net> wrote:


>
>My late grandfather, who was active in photography from the late 19th
>century to the mid 20th century, advocated use of a tripod.
>
>Davoud

A monopod might be in order if one can't afford all 3 legs. ;-)

Doug
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 8:36:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims <bsims@abnt.org> wrote:
: I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
: however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
: on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
: I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
: with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
: photography/sporting events).

: Any help/tips are welcome.

(note the following tip is a basic one but may be useful to some so please
do not be offended if it seems to be way to basic to be worth mentioning.)

You have already had several good suggestions. But one more thing to think
about is the way you are holding the camera. Some people try to hold an
SLR like they would hold a disposable paper camera, with both hands
wrapped around either end of the box. But an SLR is naturally "nose
heavy". This can induce a lot of camera shake. But if the hand that is
not being used to depress the shutter button is under the camera, with the
camera balanced along the length of the hand, you can add much more
stability. The more nose heavy the camera the further forward the
supporting hand needs to be to keep the camera balanced. In this way, if
you keep the elbow of this supporting arm tucked tight against your
side/belly the entire camera will be much more stable and thus more shake
resistant. Then when you add in breath control, leaning against a solid
object, etc, you may be suprized how long a shot you can shoot with
little or no shake. :) 

It is possible that you are already doing this but I thought I would add
the suggestion to this thread for the newbys to SLR photography who may be
gleaning tips and tricks. :) 

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 10:55:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims wrote:
> I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on).

I don't think anyone mentioned this, and you may already know this point:

- IS will only stop camera shake, it won't stop blurring due to subject
movement. Panning, positioning your shot so the the subject is moving
towards you rather than across the shot, and fast shutter speeds (and
therefore large apertures) all help.

I find I use all these techniques with my Panasonic FZ5.

Cheers,
David
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:54:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>>My late grandfather, who was active in photography from the late 19th
>>>century to the mid 20th century, advocated use of a tripod.
>>>
>>>Davoud
>>
>>A monopod might be in order if one can't afford all 3 legs. ;-)


OK, here's a free suggestion for Leki, or any other manufacturer of those
expanding walking sticks for hiking. When we are on a trek, any excess
baggage is a burden so the tripod stays in the car. We always carry the
Lekis with us, though. I have often thought how useful it would be if I
could flip open the top to reveal a standard camera tripod thread. How
about it, Leki?

Keith
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:54:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Keith Sheppard" <keith.sheppard@tesco.net> writes:
> OK, here's a free suggestion for Leki, or any other manufacturer of those
> expanding walking sticks for hiking. When we are on a trek, any excess
> baggage is a burden so the tripod stays in the car. We always carry the
> Lekis with us, though. I have often thought how useful it would be if I
> could flip open the top to reveal a standard camera tripod thread. How
> about it, Leki?

Walking sticks with tripod screws are very common. Leki might or might
not make them, but other vendors certainly do.
June 20, 2005 2:20:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I don't remember who to thank for this suggestion but it's worked
wonderfully for me: Use the 2 second timer, focus, then steady the camera
before the camera shoots its picture.

I usually combine that with AEB, using the viewfinder, and steadying the
camera with hands against my face and elbows close to my sides.

"Brad Sims" <bsims@abnt.org> wrote in message
news:slrndbc709.k5h.bsims@c933657-a.insightbb.com...
>I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
> I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
> with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
> photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.
>
> --
> Some days, my brain hurts...
>
> Where do they come from, and why won't they go back?
June 20, 2005 2:58:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Not that this really needs further clarification for people in this ng, but
that should have read:
Use the 2 second timer, focus *and squeeze the shutter*, then steady the
camera
before the camera shoots its picture.

"Renee" <rr@invalid.org> wrote in message
news:qLwte.94830$VH2.13432@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>I don't remember who to thank for this suggestion but it's worked
>wonderfully for me: Use the 2 second timer, focus, then steady the camera
>before the camera shoots its picture.
>
> I usually combine that with AEB, using the viewfinder, and steadying the
> camera with hands against my face and elbows close to my sides.
>
> "Brad Sims" <bsims@abnt.org> wrote in message
> news:slrndbc709.k5h.bsims@c933657-a.insightbb.com...
>>I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
>> however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
>> on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it helped somewhat, but
>> I was wondering what else I could try. I know that zooming out will help
>> with that as well but sometimes I need even more zoom than 12X (nature
>> photography/sporting events).
>>
>> Any help/tips are welcome.
>>
>> --
>> Some days, my brain hurts...
>>
>> Where do they come from, and why won't they go back?
>
>
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 4:32:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims <bsims@abnt.org> wrote in
news:slrndbc709.k5h.bsims@c933657-a.insightbb.com:

> I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good
> photos... however I am having some issues with camera shake (even
> with IS turned on). I tried to brace my elbows to my chest and it
> helped somewhat, but I was wondering what else I could try. I know
> that zooming out will help with that as well but sometimes I need
> even more zoom than 12X (nature photography/sporting events).
>
> Any help/tips are welcome.
>

Another thing that I don't see mentioned here. It might not necessarily
be camera shake that is making the pictures come out blurry.

Make sure you press the shutter release half way to set the focus,
before pressing it the full way to take the picture. Your camera
probably has a way of telling you if your picture is in focus or not.

Seems like a no-brainer to most, but often us newbies forget to pre-
focus, and just quickly set up the shot and push the button all the way
down, to get that pic, quickly. Pre-focusing helps a lot.

--
Eric Babula
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 6:20:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:
> "Keith Sheppard" <keith.sheppard@tesco.net> writes:
>
>>OK, here's a free suggestion for Leki, or any other manufacturer of those
>>expanding walking sticks for hiking. When we are on a trek, any excess
>>baggage is a burden so the tripod stays in the car. We always carry the
>>Lekis with us, though. I have often thought how useful it would be if I
>>could flip open the top to reveal a standard camera tripod thread. How
>>about it, Leki?
>
>
> Walking sticks with tripod screws are very common. Leki might or might
> not make them, but other vendors certainly do.

Make one yourself. Get a walking stick; cut a flat face on one end;
drill a hole for a 1/4-20 hangar bolt (can be purchased from any good
hardware store) with the threaded end cut off to a quarter inch length.
Voila.


Pete S...
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 9:08:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 10:58:57 +0000, Renee wrote:

> Not that this really needs further clarification for people in this ng, but
> that should have read:
> Use the 2 second timer, focus *and squeeze the shutter*, then steady the
> camera
> before the camera shoots its picture.
I find that my tripod and the remote release does the job.
--
neil
delete delete to reply
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 11:32:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Keith Sheppard" <keith.sheppard@tesco.net> wrote:

>I have often thought how useful it would be if I
>could flip open the top to reveal a standard camera tripod thread. How
>about it, Leki?

Leki does make such a model. I wasn't overly impressed with it. So I use a
"bent" Leki as a regular hiking pole and a Bogen monopod as my monopod. (I
don't remember the name, but if you see one, you'll know what I mean by
"bent." They're sold in pairs, so I bought a pair. One for me, and one for
my wife. We like 'em.)

--
Eric
http://canid.com/
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 11:49:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brad Sims <bsims@abnt.org> wrote:

>I just bought and love a Canon IS2... it takes darned good photos...
>however I am having some issues with camera shake (even with IS turned
>on).

I'm not sure how many frames/sec that model can take, but a "poor man's"
image stabilizer is to shoot several frames in a quick sequence. More often
than not, I can count on getting at least one sharp image out of 5 about 2
shutter speeds slower than I normally could otherwise. Add a monopod, and I
can get about 3 stops slower. Combine the techniques, and I get about 4
stops slower.


--
Eric
http://canid.com/
!