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Advice needed for first home built PC

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April 13, 2012 11:29:52 PM

Hey all,
To start..thanks for looking at my post. I'm in need of some advice. I'm trying to put together a pretty decent gaming computer. Along with that this will also be my first ever self built computer. I currently own a Alienware I bought for $4,000 a few years back and it's time to upgrade so I figured I try to do it myself for cheaper. I've spent some time reading reviews and things of that nature for all different PC components. I have a list of parts I've selected but I'm having trouble figuring out if these components are compatible with each other and also if I'm missing anything or if I've selected something that doesn't really need to be there.

So here it go's:

Approximate Purchase Date: Asap

Budget Range: Not really worried about this, I just don't want to spend an unreasonable amount of money for this computer. Keep in mind that I know this is a gaming computer and you get what you pay for but I'm not a all day and night gamer, just a casual couple night/weekend gamer. Although when I do play games such as Battlefield 3, Skyrim, and Civilization V I do want to get the most out of the game.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Dedicated to gaming. I have other computers for what I need.

Parts Not Required: I have a Razer mouse/keyboard. I have a basic 20'' monitor that I may consider upgrading..

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg.com, although not a necessity.

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: No real preference but I think I'm definetly going to need a full tower. (I currently have a full tower so space is not an issue.

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Going for a single card setup now but will SLI if game is not looking as detailed as it should.

Monitor Resolution: No preference

Here is my list of picked parts:

ASUS Rampage IV Extreme LGA 2011 Intel X79 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard

EVGA 02G-P4-2680-KR GeForce GTX 680 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

Intel Core i7-2700K Sandy Bridge 3.5GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623i72700K

G.SKILL Sniper Gaming Series+ Turbulence II 24GB (6 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7T2-24GBSRD

PLEXTOR Black 12X BD-R 2X BD-RE 16X DVD+R 12X DVD-RAM 8X BD-ROM 8MB Cache SATA 12X Blu-ray Writer PX-LB950SA LightScribe Support

Western Digital VelociRaptor WDBACN6000ANC-NRSN 600GB 10000 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive

HT | OMEGA Claro Halo XT PCI Interface Sound Card w/ a built-in HI-FI Headphone Amplifier

CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX1200 (CMPSU-1200AX) 1200W ATX12V v2.31 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC Power Supply

COOLER MASTER COSMOS II RC-1200-KKN1 Black Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case

P.S. - Thanks for the advice in advance

Best solution

a c 118 B Homebuilt system
April 13, 2012 11:57:19 PM

That motherboard will not work with that CPU. IT is an LGA 2011. 1155 is what you need.
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Also, for a gaming system there is absolutely no advantage whatsoever of a 2500k vs a 2700k. Save yourself 100 bucks.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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The motherboard further is overkill, even for a high quality gaming system.

Consider this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

--------------------------------
Do you really need a dedicated sound card? Sound controllers are integrated on most modern motherboards, and they're pretty decent.
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The board I recommended will not take 6 sticks of RAM, you don't really need 24gigs anyway. 16 is sufficient.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or you could do 2 8 gig sticks

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

----------------------
The power supply is overkill, even if you run 2 GTX 680s, this will take care of you
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-------------------------
Hard drives:

Consider going with an SSD as your primary boot you don't need a 10000RPM drive, an SSD will beat it in performance.

I'm not too read up on SSDs yet, but something like this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and this as your bulk storage drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

------------------

This build will destroy anything Alienware Dell can come up with.
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a b B Homebuilt system
April 13, 2012 11:57:55 PM

24 gb of ram is a complete waste for gaming. You will never use it. 8 gb is plenty as the most a game will use is 3 or 4, and that leaves 4 or 5 for everything else. If you were editing HD video or doing some advanced CAD work then more than 8 might be useful. If you are worried you might need more someday, then even going with 16gb would be plenty of over kill
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
April 14, 2012 12:00:38 AM

GI_JONES said:
24 gb of ram is a complete waste for gaming. You will never use it. 8 gb is plenty as the most a game will use is 3 or 4, and that leaves 4 or 5 for everything else. If you were editing HD video or doing some advanced CAD work then more than 8 might be useful. If you are worried you might need more someday, then even going with 16gb would be plenty of over kill



Agreed, we'll be on DDR4 before a gamer will need anything more than 16 Gigs.
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April 14, 2012 12:30:14 AM

Looks like it will be a good system, my 5 cents is as follows:

1/ MB- might look at Asrock extreme mbs, similar performance big price saving. I have their extreme Z68 and found no problems and if you are so-so about overclocking they have some built-in selectable options for minor/moderate overclocking which are a breeze to use.

2/ Video- for a 20" screen the 560Ti is all you need as I am assuming such a small screen only supports 1920 x 1200 anyway and save a heap of cash. The 560Ti and 560 have been the best performance for money in my opinion for 2 years now.

3/ CPU- gaming machines really don't need an I7 would suggest the I5 2500K, again big savings.

4/ RAM- Win 7 x64 only supports 16Gb of RAM for home premium and I rarely use more than 12Gb on my rig.

5/ DVD- not sure why you want a BD writer on a gaming rig. Can get a combo DVD with BD read for half the price.

6/ HDs- high speeds HD's good though would recommend an SSD for the game executables, I have no problems with an Intel SSD and I like their SSD maintenance utility - very easy to use.

7/ Sound- I have always Creative but never been happy with their build quality. Don't know Omega but do they support EAX which is useful for audio based direction finding. Do they also support DTS and DTS-HD?

8/ PSU- 1200 watts with 1 video card and 2 disks - a little over the top lol?

9/ Case- any case that has as an absolute minimum a 12cm front and rear fan. The wider the case the better for wiring and air flow.

10/ Cooling- I would suggest internal water cooling - where the radiator and pump are mounted inside the case.

Your main question as to compatibility can be answered simply - Using good quality name brands it is almost impossible to find incompatible hardware. I have been building my own machines for around 20 years and have never run into a hardware incompatibility problem.

I think you could get near identical performance and save hundreds of dollars with these suggestions - hope it help.
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April 14, 2012 1:56:42 AM

nekulturny said:
That motherboard will not work with that CPU. IT is an LGA 2011. 1155 is what you need.
------
Also, for a gaming system there is absolutely no advantage whatsoever of a 2500k vs a 2700k. Save yourself 100 bucks.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

------------------------------

The motherboard further is overkill, even for a high quality gaming system.

Consider this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

--------------------------------
Do you really need a dedicated sound card? Sound controllers are integrated on most modern motherboards, and they're pretty decent.
-----------------
The board I recommended will not take 6 sticks of RAM, you don't really need 24gigs anyway. 16 is sufficient.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or you could do 2 8 gig sticks

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

----------------------
The power supply is overkill, even if you run 2 GTX 680s, this will take care of you
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-------------------------
Hard drives:

Consider going with an SSD as your primary boot you don't need a 10000RPM drive, an SSD will beat it in performance.

I'm not too read up on SSDs yet, but something like this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and this as your bulk storage drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

------------------

This build will destroy anything Alienware Dell can come up with.

First, thank you for the response. Just for curiosities sake, if I replaced that motherboard with a http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..., used the 4x4gb 240pin ram you put, took out the I7 for the I5 you suggested, and down graded the power supply I'd have a good gaming/stable computer? The one thing I'd go against was the use of a SSD because I have no experience or knowledge about them so I'd like to keep the Western Digital HD I had originally. Also all these changed parts and original parts will definetly fit in the cased I had down right? Thanks again, your response really helped.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
April 14, 2012 2:39:27 AM

L3G3ND4RY said:
First, thank you for the response. Just for curiosities sake, if I replaced that motherboard with a http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..., used the 4x4gb 240pin ram you put, took out the I7 for the I5 you suggested, and down graded the power supply I'd have a good gaming/stable computer? The one thing I'd go against was the use of a SSD because I have no experience or knowledge about them so I'd like to keep the Western Digital HD I had originally. Also all these changed parts and original parts will definetly fit in the cased I had down right? Thanks again, your response really helped.



No problem, this forum gives me something to do when I'm slacking on my classwork. :D 

As far as a "stable" computer, that depends on what your definition of "stable" is. If you mean will it be top of the line 10 years down the road, no, 5 years? No..

No computer can give you that assurance. Theres always something better coming out "soon", today the hottest thing is the GTX 680, tomorrow it will be Ivy Bridge Intel, next week DDR4 RAM, etc. Thats why when people come on the forum asking for a system that is "future proof", I try my best to make them forget that phrase.

Thats why I suggested a cheaper motherboard. 150-250 will buy you a strong gaming motherboard be it Intel or AMD. There are even some sub 100 that are surprisingly good. Its often more cost effective to buy a cheaper system that you can rebuild in a couple years, then spend as much as you can today and try to squeeze 10 years out of.

You could spend less today and get a build that does everything you need it to today. And tomorrow you could reuse your power supply, case, DVD drive, Hard drive and do a new build 3 or 4 years from now and probably save a lot of money and get the most performance for your money. But thats your call to make, this is your computer, and its you who has to be happy with it.

The board you picked out is an Extended ATX motherboard, per Newegg, the case you picked does indeed support ExtendedATX, however since I do not own one personally, I cannot verify that with certainty. I have to go with what what is written. Personally, I have one of these, I have a full size ATX board in mine (even though it will take an extended), it looks like a dwarf inside the case. http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

If you mean "stable" as in the downgrade on the power supply. a good power supply can last you 10 years easily. And the Corsair TX series are very well made, and feature a 5 year warranty, so you can bank on them lasting you that long at the least. 850 watts is enough to run dual GTX 590s, probably one of the most power hungry video cards on the market today. You can see here their power usage: http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2011/03/24/nv...

Mind you the 491 watts its pulling is the entire system, not just the video card. So if you were to add a 2nd card you would still have enough in an 850 watt power supply to run 2 of them, and still have room for them to degrade, as PSUs will do the older they are. You will also notice that as technology advances, computer components are becoming more powerful but using less energy. For example DDR used 2.5 volts, DDR2 was 1.8, DDR3 1.5v, etc. So theres little need to worry about needing a 1200 watt PSU for future builds. Even it it became necessary to buy a new PSU, it would probably be cheaper.

As far as the RAM, 16 Gigs really is plenty. I can easily use up 5GB on my system, but I've never seen my system come anywhere close to 10GB in Windows Task Manager, and I'm pretty into multi-tasking.

Now for the CPU, you might consider that the next Generation of i5 CPUs will be released in about a month. Generally, I say not to wait for a new part because as I mentioned in the beginning of the post theres always a better part coming out "soon". And the next generation will not be a substantial improvement over the current Sandy Bridge (they rarely are), but in the interest of giving the full picture it is worth mentioning.

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i5/Intel-Core%20i5-3...

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April 14, 2012 12:34:44 PM

Best answer selected by L3G3ND4RY.
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