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I5 Ivy Bridge & 64-bit OS

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July 27, 2012 2:40:01 PM

I'm looking at building a HTPC and am going with either an i5 3450 or an i5 3570K Ivy Bridge processor. Do I want to get 64-bit OS to run with these processors? I thought they handle 64-bit but wanted to confirm for sure.

Is there anything else hardware wise that needs to specifically support 64-bit OS other then the CPU? I'll also be going with a Z77 motherboard.

Thanks!

More about : ivy bridge bit

a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 3:49:12 PM

More or less all consumer HW these days support 64-bit OS's and have 64-bit drivers.
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a c 188 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 4:36:41 PM

Yes about the only thing that we have out that does not support a 64bit OS is some Intel® Atom™ processor boards like the Intel Desktop boards D2500CC. Otherwise you are in good shape.
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a c 218 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 4:39:02 PM

The idea is not to get the Windows 32 or 64 bit for the cpu but rather for the amount of ram that you want to get so if you want more than 4 gb of ram you have to go wih 64bit OS. The cpu's today all support 64bit along with 32 bit.
As for drivers there is no problem with getting 64 bit drivers for any piece of hardware. There are a lot of computer making companies that are making and shipping stock computers with Windows Home 64 bit. It seems that they are replacing Windows 32 bit with the 64 bit version for stock computers and it's actually becoming hard to find a prebuilt computer with Windows 32 bit.
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July 27, 2012 5:24:12 PM

Thanks for all the helpful info. So from what I've read, the main thing 64 bit does for you vs 32 bit is allow for the use of more the 4GB of ram. So if you plan on going with more then 4GB of ram (which I am), then you should get 64 bit as most hardware now days will support 64 bit. Is that right?

I also thought I read that in order to even be considered Windows 7 Certified, the hardware has to support 64 bit and 32 bit, as well as they have to have drivers for both also.

So it really seems to boil down not so much on hardware/drivers (if you're staying with mainstream popular stuff), but rather how much memory you plan on installing?
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a c 188 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:31:47 PM

If you are running a 32bit Windows and you put 4GB in you will see something around 3.2GB of that RAM. The rest of that memory is assigned to extended memory. If you are you running a 64bit OS you will see the full 4GB.
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July 27, 2012 5:33:31 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
If you are running a 32bit Windows and you put 4GB in you will see something around 3.2GB of that RAM. The rest of that memory is assigned to extended memory. If you are you running a 64bit OS you will see the full 4GB.


Thanks. Following that same logic, then if I install 8GB of RAM(which is what I'm planning), with a 32bit OS I'd only see 3.2GB, whereas with 64bit I'd see the full 8GB?
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a c 218 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:35:24 PM

Yes the fact that there is so many people and companies going with 64 bit then that does prompt companies to supply 64 bit drivers for every thing. If your a company producing hardware or software today then you are going to make sure that there are 64 bit drivers for your product. I wouldn't be surprised to see Microsoft at some point go with only 64 bit OS and stop making 32 bit OS.
If you want to go with more than 4gb of ram then you do have to use 64 bit Windows and all hardware and sofware are makeing drivers for it.
Years ago when 64 bit was first being used it was very hard to get drivers for it , even though it was more stable and a better operating system then 32 bit there wasn't support for it. Windows XP changed all that and more and more people started using 64 bit to a point where there was so much pressure to supply 64 bit drivers that companies became aware of the demand and started supplying drivers.
I think most people use 64 bit today and I can't even think of using 32 bit anymore.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:37:57 PM

Yes, all of the 8GB will be visible : )
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a c 218 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:39:39 PM

bobby2478 said:
Thanks. Following that same logic, then if I install 8GB of RAM(which is what I'm planning), with a 32bit OS I'd only see 3.2GB, whereas with 64bit I'd see the full 8GB?



With 64 bit whatever the amount of ram you install that the motherboard supports will show up. If the MB supports 32gb of ram and you put in 32gb then thats the amount you will see Windows recognise.
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a c 218 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:42:44 PM

Of course the thing with ram is how much will be used by gaming and by programs.
With gaming 8gb will be plenty and you will never need more than that .
If your doing any video rendering ar encoding , then you can use more because the program will use all you have for those types of things.
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July 27, 2012 5:43:06 PM

Thanks everyone for making that more clear for me! It's clear then I'll just go with the 64bit version as I plan on using at least 8GB of RAM.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:45:14 PM

On a somewhat related note, unless you plan to play games on your HTPC you DEFINITELY don't need an i5. Save yourself some money and get a pentium or i3.
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July 27, 2012 5:53:53 PM

I won't be doing much gaming or video rendering or encoding. It will basically be my PC for regular home use, as well as my media player for all my movies. I want support for SD, HD as well as 3D, and from what I've read, both the i3 and i5 will handle that.

I'm aware that while an i3 would probably be plenty, I figured while I'm at it and building from scratch, spending a little more on an i5 won't hurt anything. I like the fact it is a true 4-core processor, and Windows 8 (which I might upgrade to at some point) makes more effective use of multiple core processors, so this may be of benefit down the road.

So my thought is while it may be a little overkill for now, at least I'm setting myself up well for the future and should have no need to upgrade in a few years for something more powerful.

Does processing of HD or 3D video make any difference between i3 and i5? Or are they both equally good? If I wanted an Ivy Bridge i3 I'd just have to wait a bit for them to be released. As I understand it, Sandy Bridge can only support 1333MHZ RAM, while Ivy Bridge can support 1600MHZ, is that right? Part of the other reason I was thinking Ivy Bridge i5 over Sandy Bridge i3.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:55:27 PM

There is no difference in between the RAM.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 5:55:42 PM

RAM speed comparison - We're looking at a less than 2% difference from the fastest to the slowest.



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a c 218 à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:03:16 PM

If you processing HD or 3D then I would go with the i5 and even if the i3 is "ggod enough" I would want to have the higher model to make the processing be much smoother and quicker.
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July 27, 2012 6:06:29 PM

That's helpful, thanks. I should also clarify that I plan on buying both CPU and motherboard from Micro Center. They already have the cheapest prices around, and if I go with an i5 Ivy Bridge I also get $50 off.

So right off the bat the cost difference between an i3 and an i5 is slashed down by $50. So I could basically get an i3 2100 for $120 on Newegg, or I can get an i5 3570K from MicroCenter for $190-$50 = $140.

So only $20 difference
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:09:01 PM

Get 3570K, in the future u will decide that u want edit video : ))

$20 is nothing, when u spend hundreds, its like a tip.
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July 27, 2012 6:14:28 PM

That was my thought as well. Initially I was looking at just the 3450, but that doesn't qualify for the $50 discount. The 3570k is only $40 more then the 3450, and with the discount ends up being $10 cheaper. Plus I get the upgraded HD4000 graphics.

They're almost paying me to upgrade for free
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:16:30 PM

Exactly.

HD4000 is enough for your needs too.
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July 27, 2012 6:21:58 PM

No I wasn't aware of the wireless HDMI. What is that exactly?
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:28:18 PM

Easily Connect Your Laptop/desk top to Your TV Wirelessly

The Push2TV adapter works with Intel Wireless Display technology enabled laptops to let you easily view whatever is displayed on your laptop screen on your HDTV via a wireless connection.

Getting started is as simple as connecting the Push2TV adapter to your HDTV with an HDMI or AV composite connector and following the intuitive setup that takes only a few mouse clicks.

Once connected, your laptop screen and audio is "pushed" to your big screen TV, and your TV basically functions like a second monitor. You can do just about anything you would otherwise do on your laptop screen.

You can run any application on your laptop and play just about any media you can play on your laptop, all on your big screen TV and from the comfort of your couch. Surf the Web, access TV shows and movies online, and go anywhere your Web browser takes you. Content requiring output protection such as Blu-ray and DVD movie playback is not supported due to copyright issues.
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July 27, 2012 6:28:24 PM

That might be helpful sometime down the road. For now I already have a long HDMI cable that runs from my media room (where my PC is) to my living room (where my TV is), so no need for wireless. But nice to know the processor supports it.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:31:05 PM

U can have your desktop connected and view whatever u see on the screen.

Its cool to have. I like that idea of no wires, we have 2 cats : )
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July 27, 2012 6:32:48 PM

Funny, my cat loves chewing on wires! He's better now that he's not a kitten anymore, but he was really bad. Anything with a wire, he'd chew through it.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:39:27 PM

Tell me about that, when we got cat twins, they have a fetish about anything stringy.

One day I teased them with dental floss and when I ditched it, she went in the trash bin ate 10 feet of it, got sick and vet. doc bill was $3000 for the operation.

So now whenever u have anything like that, its open game for the cats.

I fell to sleep with iPod and suddenly I could hear only in 1 ear. U can guess.

BTW, she is OK after her ordeal and didn't changed a bit. Still goes after it.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 6:47:07 PM

bobby2478 said:
I won't be doing much gaming or video rendering or encoding. It will basically be my PC for regular home use, as well as my media player for all my movies. I want support for SD, HD as well as 3D, and from what I've read, both the i3 and i5 will handle that.


A Sandy Bridge Pentium ($60-$80) can easily do all of this in a very small form factor. Don't be fooled into thinking you need a ATX mid size tower with an i5 k edition to run Windows and watch movies.

Obviously if you want the extra power there's nothing I can do to stop you, but you're wasting money if you only reason to by an i5 is to have the latest and greatest and because you "like the fact it is a true 4-core processor." Four cores doesn't mean anything if you aren't doing anything that requires more than 2.

Think about it in terms of convenience. A mini-ITX with a lightweight processor means a tiny computer, little to no noise, no annoying case fans/lights less space used, more mobile, etc.
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July 27, 2012 6:55:09 PM

That sucks, glad everything turned out OK though. Mine has chewed through my speaker wires for my PC, so I had to jerry rig those back together. Luckily, he's mostly outgrown this now though.

He does have an odd oral fettish with plastic bags, he LOVES to lick and chew on plastic baggies (like zip lock bags). Something about the cool plastic on his gums that he likes. He was a shelter kitten that was only 8 weeks old max when I got him, probably taken from his mom too soon, hence his weird oral fettish with plastic bags and licking fingers lol.
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a b à CPUs
July 27, 2012 7:07:18 PM

Mine too, but only her brother has it.

He goes great lengths to get some dose of plastic.

He likes also the rapper from case of water bottles.

That is harder than wal-mart bag : )

They are shelter kittens too. Our older cat (17yo) died of kidney failure

and when we wanted another cat, somebody just dropped a box on the front

door of the vet hospital with 2 kittens and we got them.

Now he picked up another thing, . He licks off fuss off of the carpet and anything u can tell.

God knows what is he doing that for : )

8 weeks is about what we got. Good age.
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July 27, 2012 8:02:09 PM

Blandge said:
A Sandy Bridge Pentium ($60-$80) can easily do all of this in a very small form factor. Don't be fooled into thinking you need a ATX mid size tower with an i5 k edition to run Windows and watch movies.

Obviously if you want the extra power there's nothing I can do to stop you, but you're wasting money if you only reason to by an i5 is to have the latest and greatest and because you "like the fact it is a true 4-core processor." Four cores doesn't mean anything if you aren't doing anything that requires more than 2.

Think about it in terms of convenience. A mini-ITX with a lightweight processor means a tiny computer, little to no noise, no annoying case fans/lights less space used, more mobile, etc.


Thanks for the input. In my case a Mid ATX tower will actually work best and allow for more future expandability. My HTPC is located in my office, which is physically separate from my Living Room where I'll be watching movies. In fact all my components are in my office, and only my TV is in my Living Room. I plan on building a rather large library with multiple drives, so a larger case allows for expandability.

So I don't need to worry about getting a mini ATX form factor that looks like a conventional component, don't need to worry about getting the quietest fan possible, and don't need tons of fancy case lights, as it will simply be in a separate room.

The Sandy Bridge 2100 I was looking at only ends up being $20 less then an i5 anyway with the MC bundle discount.
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July 27, 2012 8:09:02 PM

Yeah 8 weeks is a good age, he just ended up not being weened from his mom properly, which is why he licks and suckles fingers as he thinks he's nursing still. He thinks I'm his mom, it's pretty funny lol.

The big deal that he loves to steal is twistie ties, he has a 6th sense for whenever there is one up on a counter someplace and within minutes he'll have stolen it and is dragging it around the house. He's an orange tabby, and I've heard they tend to have unique personalities, so far it's held true to form.

I also have a female cat who is about 6 months older then he is, and she's a thief too. She doesn't chew and doesn't have the weird oral compulsive behavior her brother has with hard plastic, but she does like to seek out and steal anything small that I happen to leave out on the counter or table.
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