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Graphic card and sound card fried overnight!

Last response: in Systems
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April 15, 2012 8:51:08 PM

Hi,

I am completely at a loss as to what caused this to happen. I was having some issues with my mobo for a while with GPU usage and overall performance so I bought a used x58 mobo from someone on this site and everything worked perfectly for about a month. I was able to overclock my CPU .6ghz higher, etc. etc.

I want to blame the used motherboard, but I know it's probably not right to. So here briefly what happened.

Motherboard problems, bought a used motherboard off this site. Worked great, could overclock i7-920 to 4ghz easily on air like it should be. Everything worked great. Except when I pressed the power button, the fans would start up, then shut down, and start up again. Minor problem, it stayed on and worked great.

I slowly started to notice distortion in my speakers and poor sound quality. This all happened in about a week period. I sent my Z-5500 back and got a Z-906 for free. Z-906 still had distortion so I sent it back for yet another new set of Z-906. Still noticed distortion. Tested the sound card with headphones and some other speakers, still got distortion. Sound card must be bad.

Shortly thereafter only a couple days, a freshly RMA'ed and repaired 5970 is having issues. I notice the whites seem a bit whiter, and everything looks washed out. Basically just a degraded picture, everything washed out. I notice my 1st GPU is only going up to 400/900 instead of 725/1000. In some games I get these flashing white bars all over the screen.

All of this happened within a week period. My first initial hunch was that the used motherboard fried the components. I sware it would not have happened if I had not bought this used motherboard. I honestly have no idea what could make the components appear to have slowly fried themselves over a week period.

What I tested when I was having issues with my motherboard:

1. Power supply, bought new one tested made no difference.

2. RMA'ed 5970 twice, 2nd time they had it in repair for almost 2 weeks. They never tell you what they did to it, so don't know what they fixed if anything.

3. RMA'ed motherboard (Asus P6T Deluxe V2) twice, they didn't do anything either time. Figured it would be cheaper to buy a $85 mobo then RMA it for a third time.

4. Bought new RAM. All temps are and were fine when the components fried.

Please tell me what the heck could have possibly happened. I was obsessed for a month trying to have everything work as well as this computer was working for 2+ years. It's getting near the 3 year mark for all the components, it's my first computer build and it was rock solid for about 2.5 years and just recently everything seems to be going to ****e. Pardon my french.

From my point of view, I enjoy fixing stuff and finding out the issue if something breaks, but two components frying or breaking like this in a short period just doesn't seem fair to me and I honestly have no idea what the heck happened to them. I don't know of any power surges, and I have my computer connected to a surge protector. Blaaaahhh, not fair I was just about to sell my 5970 too . Any insight would make my day!! ty!
a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
April 15, 2012 9:35:35 PM

Hm. I it basically sounds like you have an entirely new pc with the same issues?
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April 15, 2012 9:45:47 PM

Can you post your full system specs INCLUDING what you did for overclocking? You could have done something to your motherboard when overclocking that fried your s**t
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April 15, 2012 9:49:30 PM

Maybe the previous owner of the X58 overclocked too much and somehow it degraded all of the integrated circuit components (i.e. resistors, capactiors, etc), then when you tried to OC you may have worn out the motherboard even further. Who knows, the previous owner may have been a noob at overclocking and may have done it wrong, thus wearing out the motherboard way before it's time. But on the otherhand, it could have just been a good motherboard that just started to die on you.
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April 15, 2012 9:50:46 PM

Well, no, not really. I had an Asus P6T Deluxe V2, it was giving me some issues but that's really not relevant now that might have been confusing.

I replaced the Asus P6T Deluxe V2 with an EVGA x58, and it solved some basically now irrelevant problems.

My first reaction was that the used EVGA x58 that I bought from overclockers.net somehow fried my components. Being used and all and not knowing the buyer, but he has confirmed that it was one of the best boards that he ever used so it would be silly to believe that was the reason.

I am trying to get some input on how in the world my sound card and 5970 went bad in such a short period. It just doesn't make sense judging that the 5970 was fresh from RMA and was working perfectly, and my Auzentech Prelude 7.1 (sound card) was working perfectly too. For me to get awful sound quality( distortion, popping, bad sound quality) and my graphics card to turn into a pile of steaming poo when it was all working great.

One component is believable that they just went bad through being almost three years ago. But now a fresh from RMA graphics card and a high quality sound card to go bad so close to eachother.

What could have caused the GPU and sound card to break like that? I am basically worried to use the EVGA x58 (used mobo) any more to risk breaking anything else.
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a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
April 15, 2012 10:02:50 PM

Have you been able to test the video and sound cards in another system to verify that the same behavior occurs there (and not only on the used EVGA board)?
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April 15, 2012 10:02:54 PM

kcsmacker said:
Can you post your full system specs INCLUDING what you did for overclocking? You could have done something to your motherboard when overclocking that fried your s**t


I basically followed this video and a couple others taking care not to mess with anything that shouldn't be messed with. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUIIpOg2nM8

It was stable at 4ghz according to Prime95. I may add kcsmacker that the CPU does not appear to have been damaged and I would find it hard to believe that it was damaged. The temps were fine and Prime95 gave me no errors.

i7-920 @ 4ghz (with EVGA used x58)... @ 3.4ghz on ASus P6T Deluxe V2 (the mobo I replaced.) The OC at 3.4ghz started to fail it was ridiculous and it's a piece of cake to OC with that board from the BIOS compared to the EVGA x58.

HD 5970 2GB

EVGA x58 (used one that I am suspicious about now) - Original board didn't OC well etc. - Asus P6T Deluxe V2

12GB Ripjaw DDR3

Auzentech Prelude 7.1 (sound card that went bad)

Corsair TX850W PSU


The problem is even after switching back to the P6T Deluxe V2 the GPU and sound card are still acting like they got crapped on.

Basically SchizTech, yes. I know that my ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 even though it had it problems would not be showing the same behavior unless the components themselves were damaged.

This was my first built PC, and was rock solid for about 2.5 years until these problems cropped up slowly.

From what some of you said above I am getting the idea that it is possible for an unstable CPU OC to damage other components on the motherboard as well? This is hard for me to believe if that is true! :cry: 
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a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
April 15, 2012 10:14:19 PM

Just to check, the parts act funny even with the overclocks rolled back?

That overclocking video posted shows a raised base clock (the "cpu host freq") which has the effect of raising ALL the clocks in the system, including the PCIe clock. Unlike the case with the second gen Core-i series the multiplier on the first gen can't simply be adjusted to safely OC the CPU and only the CPU.
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April 15, 2012 10:24:03 PM

CPU Host Frequency changes the PCIe clock too? Are you sure? That's crazy it doesn't say that in the BIOS it just says the target memory and CPU frequencies.

I believe that is the main setting for OC'ing the CPU is changing the cpu host freq. I believe it is similar to the Bclck when OC'ing on the ASUS P6T Deluxe V2.

You can't OC without changing the cpu host freq can you?!

And yes, I am running stock clocks on the Asus board now and still the same issues.
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a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
April 15, 2012 10:28:39 PM

CPU host freq is a different term for base clock, but they're the same thing. On the second gen Core-I series you can simply change the CPU multiplier (the CPU clock takes the system base clock and multiplies it to get to its much higher frequency). On the first-gen systems the multiplier is more tightly controlled. Anyway, the base clock (whatever it's called in the BIOS) is the single fundamental clock every other clock in the system is based off of.
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April 15, 2012 11:32:48 PM

Yeah I knew the part about base clock after OC'ing for the first time on the P6T Deluxe V2 and figured while OC'ing the EVGA x58 that cpu host frequency was similar, but are you sure it changes the PCIe clock as well?

I could have sworn I read somewhere it just effected the cpu and memory. If that is true however, I suppose that could have damaged the GPU but then again it is hard to believe because everyone changes that setting to OC and doesn't have their GPU damaged. And that still doesn't explain the sound card breaking.

xunicronx said:
Maybe the previous owner of the X58 overclocked too much and somehow it degraded all of the integrated circuit components (i.e. resistors, capactiors, etc), then when you tried to OC you may have worn out the motherboard even further. Who knows, the previous owner may have been a noob at overclocking and may have done it wrong, thus wearing out the motherboard way before it's time. But on the otherhand, it could have just been a good motherboard that just started to die on you.


This is the route of thinking I am getting to cause I don't want to blame myself, haha but he was an experienced member on overclock.net and doesn't seem like a dummy. But once again, it still brings me to the same question.

Can a failing motherboard or motherboard with worn-out circuit compoments actually damage your hardware? I would think it just wouldn't OC or start to not do things properly like I experienced on my P6T Deluxe V2. Can it actually damage components even if the temps are fine?

My temps were very cool for all components always, so that's not the issue.
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a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
April 16, 2012 12:01:08 AM

OK, scratch that. The PCIe clock is locked to the bclock in Second gen 1155 but not 1366 (X58 chipset). Sorry for the confusion as I got my head mixed up. :D  Setting a PCIe clock that high would blow up your system.
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April 16, 2012 1:34:25 AM

Does anyone know how this could have happened? Just a random coincidence? My GPU clocks are still acting odd and my sound card has definitely been busted.
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!