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Z68, H67, or P67 = which will allow me to upgrade?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 9, 2012 8:25:40 PM

Ok, so I read that the Z68 chipset was the only option that allowed switchable graphics between on-processor GPU & Discrete GPU. My plan, as a college grad with nearly exhausted funds (but a dying computer needed for my livelihood), was to build a computer from components, starting from a pretty bare integrated solution but with the ability to upgrade graphics as Money trickles in. So, since I graduated early December, research says I can get a Z68 MoBo and use integrated graphics from the sandy bridge platform, then get a really nice $150-$250 graphics card and end up with a great computer experience. BUT, I basically read that the Virtru software (on release?) adds many operational hiccups, while often choosing the wrong graphics solution AND often increasing computer power draw! Doesn't sound worth it...

Has Virtru been updated and actually become something of utility, :bounce:  or...
Forget about using an integrated GPU later and boost my budget with a motherboard that will let me follow the original plan of integrated GPU now and discrete later? :sol:  Or...
Should I just budget for a cheapo low end discrete GPU now to throw away (possibly SLi?) later when replaced by a high end card? :pt1cable: 

Mention of which chipset to recommend would be awesome, kind forum people :) 

My uses are: graphic design in Adobe CS5, some Starcraft 2 but someday I'd like to game hardcore, because I game heavily on the aging XBOX 360 console now. And i know this makes the build difficult, but I am going to have a Mac OS X boot (add windows 7 or 8 beta later). I realize that CS5 will be near-molasses slow on an integrated GPU (does 6.4 windows experience score actually translate to a $50 graphics card performance?), but if I can at least RUN (walk?) that program for now and use my slow old laptop for Starcraft till the GPU upgrade, I will at least literally be in business. CUDA core processing sounds like an honest benefit for my needs.

Thanks for reading, and in advance for your time! :hello: 

More about : z68 h67 p67 upgrade

a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 8:58:17 PM

The price diffence between z68 and p67 is pretty small most of the time, the h67 boards are cheap because they are very basic and hardly any customization.

I have virtu on my board and never had a problem with it. Besides, it can be disabled or enabled at any time.
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February 9, 2012 9:45:45 PM

Define customization? Because I don't intend to overclock anything.

Your daily work of art looks fun.
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a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 9:57:01 PM

Evshrug said:
Define customization? Because I don't intend to overclock anything.

Your daily work of art looks fun.


Being able to use virtu allows you to use quick sync without having to stick with the IGP. Quick sync allows transcoding and encoding video's accelerated by the igp (making it pretty fast and the quality isn't too bad compared to other alternatives)

If you have no intention for that or OC then get a H67 with a i7 2600 (non k) which should help with what you do (adobe).
What sort of upgrading are you curious about anyway?

And yes it is :)  i get a good laugh out of it when i'm done. I upload a new one each day :D 
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February 9, 2012 10:30:10 PM

I've honestly not heard much about Virtu having failures to work. However, this raises the question, that I'm getting reading your post, is do you actually need it? The most compelling reason for most enthusiasts, or just about anyone, would want to use Virtu for is to be able to simultaneously use their discrete video card and make use of Sandy Bridge's Quick Sync Transcoder. While a lot of hype was given over "Efficiency" in switchin between the SB Intel GPU and a discrete nVidia/AMD video card, given that most modern GPUs can adjust their clock/cores based upon load, I don't really see the power savings as all that significant.

Similarly, what chipset you want will be based on what, exactly, you want to do. If you don't want to use a 2500k or 2600k-series CPU, and generally aren't going to do OC'ing, then there's no point in spending the money on a P67; that'd suggest going with an H67 instead. The Z68, though, isn't just simply a combination of both the GPU capabilities of the H67 and the unlocked OC capability of the P67, though: it also is the only SB chipset so far that supports SSD caching. Again, though, I'm not all that sure how valuable that can be. And, of course, given your budget, you're likely not going to be sporting BOTH a SSD and HDD setup anyway, so it's a moot point.

Tentatively, unless I'm missing something, the cheapest option, the H67, would be your best bet. As for the CPU, I might be a little mistaken, but I don't recall CS5 benefiting much from HTT: this would suggest you'd just be better off buying an i5 instead of an i7. (and the last 2MB of cache wouldn't make that huge a difference, either)
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a c 92 U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 10:37:01 PM

which cpu are you actually getting? you can usually just get a cheaper cpu and motherboard and get a nice graphics card and never notice the different between it and a fast cpu.
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a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 10:43:49 PM

nottheking said:
I've honestly not heard much about Virtu having failures to work. However, this raises the question, that I'm getting reading your post, is do you actually need it? The most compelling reason for most enthusiasts, or just about anyone, would want to use Virtu for is to be able to simultaneously use their discrete video card and make use of Sandy Bridge's Quick Sync Transcoder. While a lot of hype was given over "Efficiency" in switchin between the SB Intel GPU and a discrete nVidia/AMD video card, given that most modern GPUs can adjust their clock/cores based upon load, I don't really see the power savings as all that significant.

Similarly, what chipset you want will be based on what, exactly, you want to do. If you don't want to use a 2500k or 2600k-series CPU, and generally aren't going to do OC'ing, then there's no point in spending the money on a P67; that'd suggest going with an H67 instead. The Z68, though, isn't just simply a combination of both the GPU capabilities of the H67 and the unlocked OC capability of the P67, though: it also is the only SB chipset so far that supports SSD caching. Again, though, I'm not all that sure how valuable that can be. And, of course, given your budget, you're likely not going to be sporting BOTH a SSD and HDD setup anyway, so it's a moot point.

Tentatively, unless I'm missing something, the cheapest option, the H67, would be your best bet. As for the CPU, I might be a little mistaken, but I don't recall CS5 benefiting much from HTT: this would suggest you'd just be better off buying an i5 instead of an i7. (and the last 2MB of cache wouldn't make that huge a difference, either)


http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/287?vs=288
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-3930k-3820-...
it has benefit, not too much, depends on what you are doing in adobe, but it's generally well threaded and can use HT.
I suggested mainly due to the OP mentioning CUDA which although runs fine with an i5, it makes me think the OP can take benefit of more threaded tasks making it a viable option in some cases.
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a c 376 U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 11:05:54 PM

I'd just get a cheap H61 if you aren't going to OC. SLI isn't that big of a deal IMO. Just buy a good single card when the time comes.
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February 9, 2012 11:18:04 PM

omega21xx said:
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/287?vs=288
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-3930k-3820-...
it has benefit, not too much, depends on what you are doing in adobe, but it's generally well threaded and can use HT.
I suggested mainly due to the OP mentioning CUDA which although runs fine with an i5, it makes me think the OP can take benefit of more threaded tasks making it a viable option in some cases.

Looking at the Tom's benchmark, I saw that there was a small improvement in the "Paladin" benchmark, though for the other CS5 benches, the performance difference is about what would be expected to be in line with the 100 MHz clock bump between the 2500K and 2600K.

While other applications do show a more significant benefit from using HTT, I ignored them as the poster specified that the only real non-gaming application they made use of was CS5; similarly, I also disregarded CS4 benchmarks due to the difference in optimization between the two versions. I also know that the HTT wouldn't pose a benefit in gaming, (at least when you already have four physical cores) so that leaves that out as well.

That's why I concluded that the 2500 would be more recommendable; given that it was implied money was more scarce, I have my doubts that spending some $90US extra (the plain i5 2500 is $209US, vs. $299US for an i7 2600) would really be justified for this situation. Much better to save that money, especially when they hinted at hoping to move into hardcore gaming; when they suggested their budget for a GPU would be $150-250US, kicking in an additional $90US saved on the CPU could mean a big difference.

It all boiled down to budget here; naturally if someone had the cash to burn I'd have gone ahead and recommended a P67/Z68 and a 2600K... Or even the 3930K if they were truly that flush. But on a budget, it often makes sense to trim the CPU first; there's all sorts of good deals along the ladder.
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a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 11:22:15 PM

You make a good point, I guess i wasn't considering everything at hand, must mean i need more coffee :) 
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a c 177 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 12:31:54 AM

I actually did a similar route when I bought my sb rig last summer. I got no discrete card initially then got a $250 card later. You do no need virtu, that is for using both discrete and igpu at the same time when only one monitor is present. Power consumption is actually increased as you then have an idling gpu instead of it being off. I've used virtu before just to test it out and had no bugs. It did have a slight decrease in performance in games though; I was running my discrete through the mobo.

I would suggest a thread in the new build section and we can help you pick parts for your budget. I have the i5 2500k and there's really no point in getting an i7 for graphic design. Only video and 3d rendering need that much power. The hd 3000 walks over ps and ill like cake, it just can't handle 3d very well.
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February 10, 2012 1:33:39 AM

nottheking said:
I've honestly not heard much about Virtu having failures to work. However, this raises the question, that I'm getting reading your post, is do you actually need it?


For your first point, this is the article I read today that got me questioning: http://www.channelpro.co.uk/case-study/6545/what-intel-...
If the link is blocked, it's basically a gizmodo article I found when googling the phrase "Z68 chipset" that explains the features of the chipset. I figured, the article was written when the functionality was just released, and something might have changed, so I should ask the community. In the article, they touched on an issue getting their first graphics card to work, and that Virtu would sometimes make a sub-optimal choice. Plus there was an overly complex setup in getting both drivers to work. While I think that setup is surmountable, there was enough issues an limited benefit that I wondered if the extra effort – & maintenance in keeping both GPU's drivers updated – would be worth it.

As per the question you raised... I don't transcode video or have a particular need to run both GPU options side by side – the more I think about it, the more I'm thinking I'd just be leaning on integrated graphics as a crutch in just a short term. I think you and I are on the same path of thinking, unless we are BOTH missing something... Like if ivy bridge will support SLi with the integrated graphics like Crossfire is possible on AMD chips paired with some discrete cards. *shrug*

Also... I actually did buy a SATA III SSD when I thought it would be worth it to upgrade my MacBook pro. So we've got that working for me, but I don't need smart caching cuz I know the four programs I use most & would need on there, and an IDE 250gb harddrive (with adapter already for SATA) for data and stuff. I also have a DVD burner, external backup harddrive (250gb, USB 2.0 or FireWire 400), Thermaltake Dokker case, 8 Gb Kingston 1600mHz RAM (I know the memory controller only supports 1333mHz on current gen intel chips), and Mac OS X ;)  Yes I realize that's a few extra steps, but running OS X is totally worth it to me... I'll probably save windows 7 or 8 preview for later, either in dual-boot or with parallels 7 that I also have.

K1114,
I was thinking the same. Though I'm trying to ask specific questions rather than spamming the forum (opening too many threads) and having you guys do all the work for me ;) . I also think an i7 is overkill... I was thinking about buying the i3 2105 and z68 combo on newegg, along with a corsair builder series or rosewell green series (500W and 530W respectively, to support the graphics card later).

Nottheking,
You are right, for my purposes, I don't see cutting-edge processor power really making a difference in my application. To further the point of shaving costs on CPU... going cheap makes a future upgrade utilizing the 1155 architecture a less wasteful aspiration. Thats also why I was considering going even as "low" in the range as an i3. Even that would be a huge performance gain over my just–pre-unibody Core2Duo Mac laptop that does get the job done, when it's not crashing from a bad battery and a graphics card that is starting to wear out ;)  I would like a better experience in Starcraft 2, and I know that (and skyrim, which I just broke down and bought for Xbox :(  ) tends to rely more on core clock speed and L3 caching than GPU, but I feel I should tackle my work needs and fun will come with success ;) 

Alright, I'm gonna read a few more of the comments. Thanks a lot guys!
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February 10, 2012 1:45:17 AM

h67 all the way. but why not rather invest in socket fm1? you have great graphics and a great processor in one apu (the a8 series).

The highest end processor will run you (i believe) $150, giving you four cores and 2.7ghz frequency, and motherboards run for under $60 with USB 3.0 and SATA III.

No need for a discrete card that way, and if you do get an ati card, you can run the onboard and discrete in crossfirex!
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February 10, 2012 2:15:51 AM

Evshrug said:
For your first point, this is the article I read today that got me questioning: http://www.channelpro.co.uk/case-study/6545/what-intel-...
If the link is blocked, it's basically a gizmodo article I found when googling the phrase "Z68 chipset" that explains the features of the chipset. I figured, the article was written when the functionality was just released, and something might have changed, so I should ask the community. In the article, they touched on an issue getting their first graphics card to work, and that Virtu would sometimes make a sub-optimal choice. Plus there was an overly complex setup in getting both drivers to work. While I think that setup is surmountable, there was enough issues an limited benefit that I wondered if the extra effort – & maintenance in keeping both GPU's drivers updated – would be worth it.

Well, as far as how well it works, I mostly relied on the review here on Tom's, which suggested, barring quirks with its application whitelist, was pretty solid.

Keep in mind that as far as "keeping drivers updated," that's mostly a non-issue. The basic idea with drivers is, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it;" unless you see a compelling reason to upgrade your video card drivers (such as results showing performance gains in a game you play) then there's really no need to upgrade. It's not like a security update, where there's a vulnerability attackers or malware could exploit, after all.

Evshrug said:
As per the question you raised... I don't transcode video or have a particular need to run both GPU options side by side – the more I think about it, the more I'm thinking I'd just be leaning on integrated graphics as a crutch in just a short term. I think you and I are on the same path of thinking, unless we are BOTH missing something... Like if ivy bridge will support SLi with the integrated graphics like Crossfire is possible on AMD chips paired with some discrete cards. *shrug*

Any new feature that Ivy Bridge might bring along would also require an entirely new chipset in order to support it; they would not work under Z68/P67/H67. That, and it's highly unlikely Ivy Bridge will offer this anyway; as it will be part of the "Tick," it will primarily just be a die shrink. Significant feature improvements (like what was seen for Sandy Bridge) won't come until the "Tock" of Haswell arrives in 2013. And that will almost certainly require a new socket anyhow.

Evshrug said:
You are right, for my purposes, I don't see cutting-edge processor power really making a difference in my application. To further the point of shaving costs on CPU... going cheap makes a future upgrade utilizing the 1155 architecture a less wasteful aspiration. Thats also why I was considering going even as "low" in the range as an i3. Even that would be a huge performance gain over my just–pre-unibody Core2Duo Mac laptop that does get the job done, when it's not crashing from a bad battery and a graphics card that is starting to wear out ;)  I would like a better experience in Starcraft 2, and I know that (and skyrim, which I just broke down and bought for Xbox :(  ) tends to rely more on core clock speed and L3 caching than GPU, but I feel I should tackle my work needs and fun will come with success ;) 

To be honest, I wouldn't go with a Core i3; the drop down to 2 cores will likely make a difference in many applications, including a small difference in many games. (though Skyrim seems to have dubious support for more than 2 cores) That, and you lose support for TurboCore and AES acceleration. Your performance in CS5, likewise, will hinge a lot on your CPU, even when GPU accelerated.

Also, you have my condolences for having the Xbox version of Skyrim. TES games are invariably superior when you have the option of mods; perhaps later once you have your new PC up, you can get the PC version there.
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February 10, 2012 3:10:09 AM

theinfiniti said:
h67 all the way. but why not rather invest in socket fm1? you have great graphics and a great processor in one apu (the a8 series).

The highest end processor will run you (i believe) $150, giving you four cores and 2.7ghz frequency, and motherboards run for under $60 with USB 3.0 and SATA III.

No need for a discrete card that way, and if you do get an ati card, you can run the onboard and discrete in crossfirex!


Theinfiniti,
Thank you for your AMD suggestions and finding parts on newegg for me. I had read about the integrated graphics performance of AMD chips, and the background murmurs of greater chip durability and MTTF are very attractive. I would like to try them some day, but at the moment I am trying to keep things Mac capable, which puts several restrictions on choice. Now now, don't make that face! Thanks for the effort!


Nottheking,
I was basing CPU choice largely on the benchmark results given in tom's hardware "best processors under $200" article (http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-fx-pentium-a...). Makes even the Pentium look attractive, but I figured I'd get more than a $20 upgrade to jump to i3 (now it's $30, sad face). And yeah, Ivy Brige improvements do look to be mostly in integrated graphics muscle FWIR, and new features would undoubtedly require a new MoBo with a new chipset. I'm not too concerned with additional features, I'm just thinking that if I want more cores and possibly a higher clock, a 1155 MoBo wouldn't need replaced this gen or the next once my income starts coming back.

Does CS5 (not 5.5) actually multithread it's processor load enough to actually make a big difference? My only productivity hangups now are due to handling large Rez pictures (RAM issue), recoloring artwork in Illustrator (especially with live-traced photos, may be CPU clock speed issue), and my own skill level (don't want a computer component that can replace that, LOL!). Now gaming... even without experiencing better, I can feel that the Xbox versions of BF3 and Skyrim are just a taste of their full glory. And I know that CPU's can make quite a difference those specific games, and so will many games in the future... Its something I think about, but thats quite a slippery slope, and I remember that I've gotta start paying back those college loans in 5 months and meanwhile I've moved back from my apartment to my mother's house, and how gaming is probably not the best use of that security deposit check coming for me in the mail! Moving on from poverty-level food service and retail jobs is challenging, and intimidating to put yourself out there (a lot) and find out just how much you can be worth!

Still trying, though. And thank you much for the console sympathy :]
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February 10, 2012 3:37:04 AM

jyjjy said:
I'd just get a cheap H61 if you aren't going to OC. SLI isn't that big of a deal IMO. Just buy a good single card when the time comes.


Jyjjy,
Sometimes life is just too simple for our complex minds. Thank you, and I am strongly considering this. Also, nottheking is appealing to my fun side for stepping up my processor... Maybe an H61 would save enough to make the jump to i5 in the balance? I would forget about processor upgrades on the same MoBo at that level.

To give an idea of my "budget" (more like financial situation), spending about 5 hours a day trying to get in touch with employers is my job right now (no pay or benefits), I've got just enough money in the bank to help around my Mom's house until the end of March, and my only income ATM is from tiny freelance photoshop edit jobs and the $325 left in the security deposit on the way here from my apartment during college. Oh and I have an extra iPad 2 unused that i should sell to the scary scary people of the internet. I will need my own computer for work, but since I need at least a CPU & MoBo to complete the build and perhaps a PSU if I can't use the old 450W one I salvaged from a friend, I may be in a situation of needing the chicken AND the egg at the same time, if you know what I mean.


Side note: just searched this Extreme RSY-645 ATX 450W power supply on the net... Can't find much info, looks like junk. Don't want to fry a motherboard...
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February 10, 2012 3:39:22 AM

z68, ready for IB processor.
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February 10, 2012 3:52:06 AM

tiang said:
z68, ready for IB processor.

Would an H61 motherboard NOT be ready for ivy bridge?
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a c 376 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 4:12:43 AM

Evshrug said:
Jyjjy,
Sometimes life is just too simple for our complex minds. Thank you, and I am strongly considering this. Also, nottheking is appealing to my fun side for stepping up my processor... Maybe an H61 would save enough to make the jump to i5 in the balance?

If it allows you to get an i5 instead it is definitely what I would do. H61 is Ivy Bridge compatible btw though if you grab an i5 I doubt an upgrade will make that much sense as you are already set for a while to come as far as CPU in that case.
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February 10, 2012 4:29:49 AM

Evshrug said:
Does CS5 (not 5.5) actually multithread it's processor load enough to actually make a big difference? My only productivity hangups now are due to handling large Rez pictures (RAM issue), recoloring artwork in Illustrator (especially with live-traced photos, may be CPU clock speed issue), and my own skill level (don't want a computer component that can replace that, LOL!). Now gaming... even without experiencing better, I can feel that the Xbox versions of BF3 and Skyrim are just a taste of their full glory. And I know that CPU's can make quite a difference those specific games, and so will many games in the future...

In some cases, I do recall having 4 cores does make the difference. That, and keep in mind that in most cases, a "CPU upgrade" never really does work out in the end: the socket will be EoL'd in a couple years, and CPUs will becomes scarce, and the upgrade simply won't become price-effective in the end. That's why I tend to favor a strong CPU up-front: you can readily replace the GPU, but the CPU just won't make much sense to upgrade, so pick one you can plan on not upgrading for the life of the machine. (and typically 2-4 years, depending on the kind of user you are)

Evshrug said:
Jyjjy,
Sometimes life is just too simple for our complex minds. Thank you, and I am strongly considering this. Also, nottheking is appealing to my fun side for stepping up my processor... Maybe an H61 would save enough to make the jump to i5 in the balance? I would forget about processor upgrades on the same MoBo at that level.

Ah, shame on me for forgetting the H61. Certainly, that'd be an even cheaper alternative to the H67, and yes, would have exactly the same CPU support. The things you'd give up are comparatively minor; you lose two SATA ports, (dropping down to only five drives maximum) only 10 USB ports included instead of 14, and it's only SATA-II rather than 6gb/sec SATA. (aka SATA-III) These are all really minor things; even if you had a drive that supported SATA III, the benefit is rather dubious currently, as the 3gb/sec of SATA-II is high enough to almost never be the bottleneck.

Quote:
Side note: just searched this Extreme RSY-645 ATX 450W power supply on the net... Can't find much info, looks like junk. Don't want to fry a motherboard...

That's likely the safe assumption to make. Personally I wouldn't build a new system with anything less than a 600w unit for starters... And a lack of information likely means no good things to hear about it.
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a c 177 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 4:53:23 AM

600w is too much for a lot of systems, that's enough for oc 2600k and 7970.

$400 can get you an i5 system. If you live by a micro center they have the best deals on cpus. Do you need a monitor and os? Do you need every component? (minus the gpu now of course). We could then suggest some parts to give you an idea.
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a c 376 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 5:00:39 AM

nottheking said:
That's likely the safe assumption to make. Personally I wouldn't build a new system with anything less than a 600w unit for starters... And a lack of information likely means no good things to hear about it.

Brand matters more than rating IMO. Nothing wrong with a 400-500w from a good brand unless you will be using a high end video card.
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February 10, 2012 5:01:24 AM

nottheking said:
In some cases, I do recall having 4 cores does make the difference. That, and keep in mind that in most cases, a "CPU upgrade" never really does work out in the end: the socket will be EoL'd in a couple years, and CPUs will becomes scarce, and the upgrade simply won't become price-effective in the end. That's why I tend to favor a strong CPU up-front: you can readily replace the GPU, but the CPU just won't make much sense to upgrade, so pick one you can plan on not upgrading for the life of the machine. (and typically 2-4 years, depending on the kind of user you are)


Oh, I'm a stretch it out kind of guy :)  TBH, I always pushed the budget in the past, my current situation is a first since like jr high... I always work hard and save for nice things. i5 is looking more and more the way to go... Jfjfjcujdfhcujsbsiefucjndb >_<

nottheking said:
That's likely the safe assumption to make. Personally I wouldn't build a new system with anything less than a 600w unit for starters... And a lack of information likely means no good things to hear about it.


Yeah, I've seen a lot of "over-fulfill your current needs" attitude, and it is a safe one. I'm kind of in an unfamiliar attitude right now, kind of like an overclocker, except I'm trying to squeeze out just a bit of a smaller budget. Oh and there are people talking about the PSU. Mostly about how shoddy the QC and craftsmanship is, lol. But using Newegg's PSU wattage calculator, making generous assumptions about FUTURE computer upgrades, my build (assuming multiple harddrives, lotsa RAM, $250 class discrete graphics, etc) was recommended to be mated with a 400W PSU. SOOO... Corsair builder series 500W, or Rosewell Green series 530W (both 80 PLUS certified, single rail, high amp, 2x PCI power cables)?

I'm gonna go configure a Newegg shopping cart...
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February 10, 2012 5:07:53 AM

k1114 said:
600w is too much for a lot of systems, that's enough for oc 2600k and 7970.

$400 can get you an i5 system. If you live by a micro center they have the best deals on cpus. Do you need a monitor and os? Do you need every component? (minus the gpu now of course). We could then suggest some parts to give you an idea.


I have a very nice color-calibrated monitor with dual-link DVI, and I was going to use Mac OS X as my operating system. May play with a Win 8 preview at the end of the month, probably an OEM Win7 at some point, but I'm set on those points (plus a PS2 keyboard & Wacom tablet as my pointing device. Also have a Logitech laser mouse that sees little use these days, I'm so used to trackpad and pen tablet).

I live in Pittsburgh PA for now, how would I find a local micro center? Just google map it? Lol
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a c 376 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 5:13:16 AM

I'm not seeing any good deals on cheap PSUs at the moment so I'd hold off on picking one out for a few days and keep an eye out for deals. I recommend sticking with quality brands like Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, XFX, OCZ, Silverstone, Enermax, etc.
Or if you happen to need a case as well this is a pretty good deal;
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Nice case and the PSU should handle anything up to an HD6870.
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February 10, 2012 6:02:10 AM

Ok, so I got some things together, and then my iPad's newegg cart crashed. Lol

So, with a gigabyte H61 MoBo for 69.99 + the Rosewill 530W PSU for 49.99 =
$119.98

Add the cheapest i5 to that and I can be up & running for =
$299.97
Newegg has $15 off the i5 2500, so with that instead =
$314.97

IF instead I got a GIGABYTE GA-Z68A-D3H-B3 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Motherboard, plus the i3 2120 3.3 GHz CPU with hyperthreading (4 logical cores) =
$271.67
Of course, we could subtract from that if we switch for the H61. Oh, and the Gigabyte H61 board has a $10 take-forever rebate. Whoopee...
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February 10, 2012 6:07:14 AM

jyjjy said:
I'm not seeing any good deals on cheap PSUs at the moment so I'd hold off on picking one out for a few days and keep an eye out for deals. I recommend sticking with quality brands like Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, XFX, OCZ, Silverstone, Enermax, etc.
Or if you happen to need a case as well this is a pretty good deal;
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Nice case and the PSU should handle anything up to an HD6870.


I already bought the Thermaltake Dokker case because it was on sale. Also some arctic silver 5 with cleaning solutions, anti-static wrist band, a 8 Gb RAM 1600 MHz Kingston hyper Blu kit (2x 4gb matched pair), and a SATA III 60GB SSD from Other World Computing.
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a c 376 U Graphics card
February 10, 2012 12:38:49 PM

Exactly what Rosewill PSU do you mean? They have some ok units but in general are not a particularly good brand.
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February 10, 2012 2:39:19 PM

jyjjy said:
Exactly what Rosewill PSU do you mean? They have some ok units but in general are not a particularly good brand.

This one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

120 people gave it 4 eggs or better (70% of replies), and if you figure that 113 of those people gave it full marks AND give consideration to the vocal minority of people who had bad experiences (and would be more compelled to talk about it), I have a bit of faith in the model's likely "A-OK" factor ;) 

There is a dearth of information on whether the bp430 power supply included in the Antec combo you listed above is the 12.2 or improved .3 version, plus it can only supply a maximum 20A to the computer.

Side note... How did you join the website in 1970? And be only 35 years old? O.o
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February 11, 2012 4:59:10 PM

I would just like to go on the record and say that I set this thread to post on the Motherboards section, but the safari browser on my iPad refreshed the page and I didn't notice on my first post that the category selection had reverted back to the forum I had been browsing at the time.

I ended up buying a Z68 MoBo, because I didn't see a gigabyte ATX sized H-series board, and I thought I would lose too many ports and slots compared to even a micro ATX z68 board. I feel kinda stuck to the Gigabyte brand as that is the easiest to enable Mac OS X on, and I am too heavily invested in the OS to not have it on my main computer.

Newegg had a sale on the Z68, Rosewill MoBo, and Xigmatec fan that I took advantage of, and I will patiently add a CPU once I have income so I don't have to skimp. Aka I'm leaning towards an i5 2500 when I can afford it plus newegg is running a sale to get it under $200 again.

Who wants to be marked best answer?
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February 11, 2012 5:04:48 PM

k1114 said:
600w is too much for a lot of systems, that's enough for oc 2600k and 7970.

$400 can get you an i5 system. If you live by a micro center they have the best deals on cpus. Do you need a monitor and os? Do you need every component? (minus the gpu now of course). We could then suggest some parts to give you an idea.


I live 135 miles from the nearest micro center :( 
And they truly do have great CPU deals

2550k? $199 + 5.99 shipping for an unlocked 3.4 GHz CPU, no included heatsink, no iGPU. I imagine this is perfect for some! Interesting, but in my case I'd need a discrete card right away.
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a c 177 U Graphics card
February 11, 2012 5:37:48 PM

The rosewill green series are decent psus. You didn't actually need to buy thermal paste or an aftermarket heatsink, but cooler and quieter is a plus. (The hsf comes with it's own thermal paste and the cpu comes with pre applied paste and a hsf.) I suggest buying a full working computer all at once. Something new is always coming out and buying some parts now gets you stuck with old tech. IB comes out in april which will be the same cost as SB. But performance-wise it's not worth the upgrade from an i5 if you bought now. I would suggest a k version cpu. I know you said you won't oc but SB makes it really easy. You can even do the auto oc with a single click and have a decent boost in performance. You already have an aftermarket cooler and a capable mobo.

The forum bug with 1970 is known by most experienced people here. I think they keep it for giggles. It happens when you have a lot of posts.

Edit: Btw I think nottheking has the best post.
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February 11, 2012 6:07:21 PM

Giggles are good. Made me lol a bit when I saw 1970.

And yes something new is always coming out before the current gen is fully utilized. April isn't far off, but it sounds, from the scant rumors that appeared on my radar, that it's main upgrade would be Watt draw and iGPU bumps. I'm confident that in the time I would spend waiting two months or so, having a reliable computer would earn me enough money to buy an awesome graphics card and afford some modest difference in an electric bill. I mean, I'll have enough cash on hand to get a nice CPU as soon as I sell this extra iPad my college gave me.

Also, the Xig is a case fan (bit of a splurge to add the 2nd fan, but the rebate will fully refund it eventually), and I bought the arctic silver last month cuz it would push me into free shipping on an Amazon order, and I figured I might be able to smooth out the performance in my MBP with some Tender Loving Care while "doing it right" with what will honestly be my first computer built entirely from parts. I intend to have the build work solidly for at least 4 years with daily use, especially if I add an OEM windows for dual-booting, so NOT pushing the processor seems a reasoned choice. OC = YMMV, right?

Edit: yeah I was thinking the same thing, that and I might've dragged this out too much LOL. But thanks for your posts too, you and others made good points I'm taking into consideration as well. Hopefully, I will learn enough to come back and give back to the community.
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February 11, 2012 6:11:35 PM

Best answer selected by Evshrug.
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a c 271 U Graphics card
February 11, 2012 8:18:02 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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