Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Some opinions about high-end rigs

Last response: in Systems
Share
April 18, 2012 11:23:50 PM

We'll be building new high-end rigs with one friend this year, and they will be used for pretty much everything - hardcore gaming, multimedia, overclocking and some more demanding stuff. They also need to be very durable since we'll probably keep using them until they totally fail, hopefully at least 10 years from now :)  This is what we have chosen so far:

/my config:
case: Cooler Master HAF 922 (already owned)
motherboard: Asus Sabretooth Z77
cpu: Intel Core i7-3770K
cooling: Thermalright Silver Arrow
memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 2x8GB DDR3 1600MHz 1.5V CL9
graphics card: ASUS Radeon HD 7970 3GB DirectCU II Top
sound card: AuzenTech X-Fi HomeTheater HD
psu: Seasonic X-760
storage: 5x2TB WD Caviar Black
fans: 200mm Cooler Master Megaflow and 120mm/140mm Enermax Apollish Vegas

/his config:
case: Cooler Master HAF X
motherboard: Asus Maximus V Formula
cpu: Intel Core i5-3570K
cooling: Swiftech H2O-320 Edge HD
memory: Corsair Vengeance 2x4GB DDR3 1600MHz 1.5V CL9
graphics card: EVGA GTX680 Hydro Copper
sound card: Asus (RoG?) SupremeFX4 (onboard)
psu: Seasonic X-660
storage: 2TB Seagate + 120GB Intel SSD (64gb for hdd cache and the rest for the OS)
fans: same as mine

Both rigs should stick to black + red color theme and not too much power consumption / noise.
We did a lot of research so hopefully it will work well like this, but I still thought I'd better consult with the "pros" :) 

More about : opinions high end rigs

April 19, 2012 7:06:52 AM

BTW you can consider that 2600K or 2700K for me and 2500K for him in case Ivy Bridge fails, but I hope it doesn't. He may also get a GTX670 Ti instead, since he'll be using a single 1080p screen, whereas I'll be doing Eyefinity 3x1080p, hence the AMD card.
April 19, 2012 7:48:43 AM

If you really want high-end for gaming, overclocking and benchmarking,
How about the following:

Motherboard : EVGA SR-X
CPU : DUAL Intel Xeon E5-2690 8-core, 16-Thread, 2.90 GHz, 20 MB Cache Processors
RAM : 96 GB Corsair Dominator GT, 1866 MHz (12x 8 GB)
GPU : DUAL nVidia GeForce GTX 690 for Quad-SLI.
Storage : 1.440 TB - Intel SSD 520 (3x 480 GB in RAID 0 @SATA III - 6 Gbps) AND
1.920 TB - Intel SSD 520 (4x 480 GB in RAID 0 @SATA II 3 gbps)
APU : ASUS Xonar Essence STX
Optical Drive : Blu-Ray Writer at SATA III - 6 gbps.
Headphones/set : Sennheiser HD 800 and/or Sennheiser PC 360

The rest is up to you, :D 
Related resources
April 19, 2012 8:25:32 AM

Lol that's not high end, that's ultra extreme end :D  I've drooled over the same configuration before, but the ones we have chosen have about the right power for what we need them. So basically I'm asking whether we need some small changes or we can get them like they are now.

BTW I myself will spend the amount of money needed for your suggestion in order to get a home theather-like 5.1 audio system and a logitech g27 wheel and a trackir 5 and other sweet stuff like that, which will actually be used a lot more than the NASA power of your suggestion :) 
April 19, 2012 9:25:54 AM

Interesting video. Will be waiting for a review.
April 20, 2012 6:39:54 AM

Is it true that the asus dc2t 7970 that I chose has problems with the cooler when overclocked? Can somebody that has bought it share how does his perform?
April 20, 2012 6:47:53 AM

Ok. As far as lasting 10 years while gaming at high graphics..not sure if possible. Technology is moving so fast these days that rig will be great for like 5 years, but after that there will be like a gtx 1190 and AMD 11790. it will be durable of course, but in terms of gameplay quality and demands.......?
April 20, 2012 7:37:53 AM

^When I said lasting, I didn't mean the compatibility with the newer games. ArmA 3 and rFactor 2 come out this year and these will probably be my last 2 games, since game companies stopped making good games anymore and only pull out casual crap like Call of Duty. So the PC will be used for all quality hardcore games from Doom (1994) (maybe a few older too) all the way up to ArmA 3. What I meant with lasting is that I want the components to last as long as possible. I know overclock and durability don't go well together, but I can get a second hand replacement for the CPU when it fails, so as long as everything else is as durable as possible (most importantly the mobo and HDDs) I'm sold :) 
April 25, 2012 3:41:12 PM

After Ivy Bridge came out, I'm kind of puzzled at the results from reviews. It turns out it is running very hot on air cooling and that limits the overclockability. If a sandy bridge reaches let's say 5 GHz, and ivy bridge reaches let's say 4.5 ghz, how would they compare in performance? Is the sandy gonna be faster, or maybe about equal?
May 7, 2012 2:16:55 AM

GodOfGaming said:
After Ivy Bridge came out, I'm kind of puzzled at the results from reviews. It turns out it is running very hot on air cooling and that limits the overclockability. If a sandy bridge reaches let's say 5 GHz, and ivy bridge reaches let's say 4.5 ghz, how would they compare in performance? Is the sandy gonna be faster, or maybe about equal?


Yes, Intel has admitted that Ivy bridge runs hotter when overclocked. But didn't say anything about the temperature on stock. This is due to the fact that Ivy bridge is using a smaller die size which packs more transistor in smaller space. This generates more heat and another fact that they use thermal paste conductor instead of soldered materials to transfer heat from the die to the integrated heat spreader makes it run hotter than sandy-bridge.

But in terms of performance, It looks like it has a slightly improved clockspeed with a significantly less power required. So, I'm guessing that if you want to overclock, you might as well be using Sandy Bridge with a liquid cooling. But if you are not overclocking, I think an aircooler with Ivy Bridge is sufficient. Remember, overclocking will drive your electric bill to go up and without a good cooler, you're looking at a very short processor life.

Personally, I'm going to use Intel i7-3770 at stock speed of 3.4 GHz, with only 77 W TDP. That should keep my CPU cool with a standard aftermarket cooler, yet very power-efficient. And I never really need too much clockspeed anyway.
!