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How to make a computer overheat.....

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a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 3:58:09 PM

Kind of a odd question but non of my computers overheat, probably a good thing , full load around 50-55c, even with a P4 521 prescott, using this cooler- http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Hp+Dc7600+cooler&um=1&hl... - Yes it has a delta, but it is never at its full speed...


The Intel burn test (what ever its called), apparently stresses the CPU more than prime95 and makes it generate more heat, doesn't seem to work on mine.....

I could make it overheat by disconnecting the fan but thats the boring way of doing it, at least in my opinion it is...

More about : make computer overheat

a c 448 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 4:25:50 PM

The easiest way to make a P4 Prescott to overheat is by simply removing the heatsink all together.

If you want to put in a bit more effort, then tape up all the vents before turning on the PC.
August 1, 2012 4:37:17 PM

Put a heater near you intake that will boost your temps, but most CPU will just turn off when it reaches critical temps.
Related resources
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 4:42:05 PM

People say prescotts are hot CPUs, in my case their not, weird...

What software stresses the CPU the most?
August 1, 2012 4:43:59 PM

What I did was i took off the CPU cooler, put 3 drops of water and see them boil. Then i used a table fan to see the cooling. Try overclocking it as well. Try to put a high end GPU and make it bottle neck! How else can you torture it?
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 4:46:13 PM

I,m looking for ways that don't involve taking the CPU cooler off.

High end GPUs won't fit in my case and my BIOS locked the multiplier or i would of overclocked it ages ago....
(HP DC7600).
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:02:29 PM

Ah, with intel burn test on maximum, its currently at 61c... and the fans are hardly spinning...
a c 78 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:06:33 PM

Ahh I wish I could have lived back in the day when Science really had no purpose! Lets murder a CPU. How about becoming a heavy smoker for a year and chainsmoking around your computer? You wouldn't believe how badly nicotine builds up inside the case.
a c 283 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:07:41 PM

It feels weird helping in a post like this :pt1cable:  , but unplug any and all fans, maybe? They may not be moving MUCH air, but I'm guessing they're doing something to help cool things down.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:08:29 PM

Not trying to kill it or murder it, just stress it alot, and to kind off see how good my little heatsink is (look at the link in the description)...
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:09:22 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
It feels weird helping in a post like this :pt1cable:  , but unplug any and all fans, maybe? They may not be moving MUCH air, but I'm guessing they're doing something to help cool things down.


The heatsink is smaller and better than the intel stock heatsink...
a b à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:12:57 PM

run prime and furmark for 72 hours if you make it that long.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:15:42 PM

wr6133 said:
run prime and furmark for 72 hours if you make it that long.


Could do that, i will try the Intel thing for a little while then i will do that, after a few hours i will post temps of the CPU, can't check GPU temps as thermal sensors in it aren't recognised...
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:32:10 PM

UPDATE- put fans at 1/2 to 3/4 speed at temps are 48-49c
At full speed (noisy, i small delta and a 92mm foxconn fan)- 47c.
That is good for a little heatsink, even with the fans at max, the stock CPU cooler wouldn't be able to take it.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 1, 2012 5:45:00 PM

Might seem obvious, but never run furmark with 8xAA at 1080p on an ATI Raedon X1650SE, makes windows lag and lags on furmark (1-5 FPS).

a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 10:48:23 AM

With fans on full, 5% load is 35-36c, by the way P4s don't have speedstep so its always at 2.8 GHz.

With fans set to minimum, 5% load 45-46c (remember, small heatsink inside small case -DC7600-)...

Do you think these are good for the heatsink installed compared to intel's stock?
August 3, 2012 10:52:36 AM

run prime 95 , super pi , a hd movie and toms hardware lol and let the buger burn
this even caught my i5 of guard!
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 10:57:01 AM

panwala95 said:
run prime 95 , super pi , a hd movie and toms hardware lol and let the buger burn
this even caught my i5 of guard!


I'll do that and post temps aswell.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 11:42:58 AM

Intel Pentium 4 521- LGA775, Prescott, 2.8GHz, 1MB cache, has HT enabled....
ATI Raedon X1650SE dedicated- 256-512MB RAM, PCI-E.....
2GB DDR2 RAM- Win7 x86 pro.
Big Buck Bunny animation (youtube) 1080p
Prime95- In-Place large FFTs.
Superpie (LOL)-calculate 32M
Opera- 2 tabs (toms, youtube).
PC wizard 2012 (only program that monitors a pentium 4's temps).
Computer has alot of internet space (my laptop and the computer currently using it).
Start- 42c
Status- running, smooth.
Prime and pie started- slow down a little.
Video started- computer running, video 0-2FPS.
Looking through the forums of toms HW, windows still good.
Reopening PC wizard- having 'busy application problems)...

Opera still smooth, I think the fans have just started to spin faster (medium speed, less than 3/4), posted a few replys, starting to get laggy abit trying to restart video..
Damn, PC wizard stopped responding.
Current temps-57c , fans on medium speed.

a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:13:24 PM

Stopped prime and closed pie, the video finished, load spikes under 30% at 45-46c at a medium low fan speed.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:39:17 PM

Anything else you lot want me to try...
a c 283 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:46:57 PM

Well, it's extreme, but take the fan off of the cooler and wrap the cooler up in something (a hand towel?) to insulate it and keep the heat from escaping. And unplug any other fans too and seal up any openings in the case as mentioned before.

If all of that together doesn't cause a massive heat build up after a while under stress testing, nothing will.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:49:03 PM

I disconnected the fan once before, took a while but eventually it turned off (safety feature, i was kinda seeing if it had one).
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:49:48 PM

So you want me to see how long it lasts under stress without the fan?
a c 283 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:51:26 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
So you want me to see how long it lasts under stress without the fan?


That's the plan, yeah (or the less extreme part of it anyway, lol).
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 12:53:15 PM

Challenged accepted, might take a while, have to set it all up (try to get the heatsink as cool as i can when i start).
a c 104 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 1:02:00 PM

DJ.D, i have to do it another time, need to go somewhere.
a c 283 à CPUs
August 3, 2012 1:03:19 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
DJ.D, i have to do it another time, need to go somewhere.


No problem. Not like this is life or death, lol.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 12:33:01 PM

All right. how should i do this, turn off the fans during the test or what?
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 1:12:36 PM

Resumed from sleep with the fans off with prime95 running (the middle option) with 4 tissues covering the heatsink...
Time taken to turn off from high temps, started as soon as i press the space bar-
Turn off at 06.22.0 (mins/secs/nsecs) at 110c.
a c 283 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 2:48:53 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
Turn off at 06.22.0 (mins/secs/nsecs) at 110c.


Nice and toasty. :D  That accomplished it quite well.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 2:53:46 PM

Is that time good for that little heatsink?
a c 283 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 3:01:05 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
Is that time good for that little heatsink?


I'm honestly not sure because I don't have any experience with P4's (oddly enough, I was an AMD guy then), so I have nothing to compare it to, but it lasted longer than I though it would, for sure.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 3:12:10 PM

Still beats the intel stock cooler in my opinion, that thing needs more metal....
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 3:28:37 PM

Here some pics of the comp setup-

The main part, what i did


Showing the fans disconnected-


After the computer turned off, power LED blinking red showing overheating...


Kinda crappy quality shot with an HP (lol) Photosmart E337, why the LOL, because this computer is an HP...
August 7, 2012 3:37:25 PM

Is very easy you can increase the cpu voltage to 1.425 is 'safe' (acording to intel) turn your real of your pc fasing the wall really close.

Run a prime 95 custome torture mode 4 threads with half of your cpu cache 500 KB to minimal maximal fft and half the ram ussage + furmark in extream buring mode + writing a dvd double layer if you have 2 DVD's on the fly is better + norton 360 full scan.

if you burn everyting in your motherboard or your cpu you don't have the right to make a Lawsuit to me ok ?
a c 96 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 4:09:35 PM

If you want to make a CPU overheat, turn off all of the fans in the system (including the CPU fan) and run something that pegs the CPU at 100%. Your CPU temp will creep upwards until it hits the "critical" temp where it throttles and skips clock cycles. Your temps should either hang right around the "critical" temp as the CPU goes between normal function and throttling, or if your case is really hot, temps will continue to rise and the CPU will eventually the entire computer off to save itself. It is hard to roast a CPU like in the old days due to the catastrophic thermal protection in modern CPUs. If you want to fry a CPU like you used to be able to in the late 1990s, get yourself a late 1990s CPU, remove the heatsink, and fire it up. Smoke should ensue shortly.

jay_nar2012 said:
People say prescotts are hot CPUs, in my case their not, weird...

What software stresses the CPU the most?


Prescotts were hot for their day as they were the first 100+ watt CPUs. The Prescott and their dual-core derivatives Smithfield and Paxville were the first units to hit the current "thermal ceiling" of 130-165 watts. Overclocked they top out in the mid-200 to low 300 watt range. just like modern top-line CPUs. They mainly ran hot because heatsinks hadn't caught up yet. A state of the art heatsink when the Prescott was new was something like a Zalman 7700 with an 80-ish mm solid-base fan and weighing a few hundred grams Now we have 140 mm dual-fan, heatpipe-equipped heatsinks weighing around 1000 g.

If you are talking about anything other than full-load temps, modern CPUs run much cooler because most Prescotts had little to no power management at idle. Everything ran at full speed, full voltage, and nothing was clock gated off. Modern CPUs lower clock speed and voltage a bunch at idle and turn unused cores and cache off.

nekulturny said:
Ahh I wish I could have lived back in the day when Science really had no purpose! Lets murder a CPU. How about becoming a heavy smoker for a year and chainsmoking around your computer? You wouldn't believe how badly nicotine builds up inside the case.


If smoking puts a heavy layer of sticky, stinky, waxy goop over all of the parts in a computer, think about what it does to your lungs. The computer is also only a secondhand smoker. Your lungs also have several orders of magnitude more surface area than a computer heatsink to get clogged with that crap. You can't exactly take a toothbrush, 91% percent isopropyl alcohol, and 120 psi of compressed air to clean out your lungs like you can a tarred-up heatsink.
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 5:19:22 PM

MU_Engineer said:
If you want to make a CPU overheat, turn off all of the fans in the system (including the CPU fan) and run something that pegs the CPU at 100%. Your CPU temp will creep upwards until it hits the "critical" temp where it throttles and skips clock cycles. Your temps should either hang right around the "critical" temp as the CPU goes between normal function and throttling, or if your case is really hot, temps will continue to rise and the CPU will eventually the entire computer off to save itself. It is hard to roast a CPU like in the old days due to the catastrophic thermal protection in modern CPUs. If you want to fry a CPU like you used to be able to in the late 1990s, get yourself a late 1990s CPU, remove the heatsink, and fire it up. Smoke should ensue shortly.



Prescotts were hot for their day as they were the first 100+ watt CPUs. The Prescott and their dual-core derivatives Smithfield and Paxville were the first units to hit the current "thermal ceiling" of 130-165 watts. Overclocked they top out in the mid-200 to low 300 watt range. just like modern top-line CPUs. They mainly ran hot because heatsinks hadn't caught up yet. A state of the art heatsink when the Prescott was new was something like a Zalman 7700 with an 80-ish mm solid-base fan and weighing a few hundred grams Now we have 140 mm dual-fan, heatpipe-equipped heatsinks weighing around 1000 g.

If you are talking about anything other than full-load temps, modern CPUs run much cooler because most Prescotts had little to no power management at idle. Everything ran at full speed, full voltage, and nothing was clock gated off. Modern CPUs lower clock speed and voltage a bunch at idle and turn unused cores and cache off.



If smoking puts a heavy layer of sticky, stinky, waxy goop over all of the parts in a computer, think about what it does to your lungs. The computer is also only a secondhand smoker. Your lungs also have several orders of magnitude more surface area than a computer heatsink to get clogged with that crap. You can't exactly take a toothbrush, 91% percent isopropyl alcohol, and 120 psi of compressed air to clean out your lungs like you can a tarred-up heatsink.



Thanks for the info...
But my heatsink has a 40mm-60mm fan, here are some comparisons between the heatsink, a coke can and a poundland screwdriver kit...
Maybe mine isn't that hot as the die size is 90nm compared to the first prescotts.

The heatsink.


Some comparisons.








Taken with a unbranded webcam thing......
Worse than the HP
August 7, 2012 5:42:58 PM

MU_Engineer said:
If you want to make a CPU overheat, turn off all of the fans in the system (including the CPU fan) and run something that pegs the CPU at 100%. Your CPU temp will creep upwards until it hits the "critical" temp where it throttles and skips clock cycles. Your temps should either hang right around the "critical" temp as the CPU goes between normal function and throttling, or if your case is really hot, temps will continue to rise and the CPU will eventually the entire computer off to save itself. It is hard to roast a CPU like in the old days due to the catastrophic thermal protection in modern CPUs. If you want to fry a CPU like you used to be able to in the late 1990s, get yourself a late 1990s CPU, remove the heatsink, and fire it up. Smoke should ensue shortly.



Prescotts were hot for their day as they were the first 100+ watt CPUs. The Prescott and their dual-core derivatives Smithfield and Paxville were the first units to hit the current "thermal ceiling" of 130-165 watts. Overclocked they top out in the mid-200 to low 300 watt range. just like modern top-line CPUs. They mainly ran hot because heatsinks hadn't caught up yet. A state of the art heatsink when the Prescott was new was something like a Zalman 7700 with an 80-ish mm solid-base fan and weighing a few hundred grams Now we have 140 mm dual-fan, heatpipe-equipped heatsinks weighing around 1000 g.

If you are talking about anything other than full-load temps, modern CPUs run much cooler because most Prescotts had little to no power management at idle. Everything ran at full speed, full voltage, and nothing was clock gated off. Modern CPUs lower clock speed and voltage a bunch at idle and turn unused cores and cache off.



If smoking puts a heavy layer of sticky, stinky, waxy goop over all of the parts in a computer, think about what it does to your lungs. The computer is also only a secondhand smoker. Your lungs also have several orders of magnitude more surface area than a computer heatsink to get clogged with that crap. You can't exactly take a toothbrush, 91% percent isopropyl alcohol, and 120 psi of compressed air to clean out your lungs like you can a tarred-up heatsink.


That was one of the BEST posts i ever seen! Yes he is telling you we can get 300 watts heat load to the CPU that your cooler can't hanlde as it is to small.

Seens i toled you to increase the volts to 1.425 change and the multiplier as far as you can you must give me your PSU watts to set the tests properly again for a sure burn down can you deactivate from the bios the max temp shudown btw? We can burn the cpu faster this way...
a c 104 à CPUs
August 7, 2012 5:54:29 PM

I,m not trying to 'burn down' anything, you can burn down your own comp if you want but i would rather have a working computer than a burnt out one if it would even burn out.

I can't change the multiplier or the voltage as it uses an OEM stock board and i can't turn off the thermal shutdown feature and if i could i wouldn't anyway.

I might try the prime95 thing...
August 7, 2012 5:56:37 PM

wr6133 said:
http://cdn.overclock.net/2/2f/2f0eb81c_cooler-pc-case-m...

Use this and forget to connect the molex would make a rather comic overheat



AHAHAHAHAHAHA YES!! I toled you to cover the rear only as close as you can to the wall? We can block every outgoing and incoming is better...

wr6133 i'm crying in here hahahhahahahahahaha
a c 104 à CPUs
August 8, 2012 12:03:18 AM

Giatrakis said:
AHAHAHAHAHAHA YES!! I toled you to cover the rear only as close as you can to the wall? We can block every outgoing and incoming is better...

wr6133 i'm crying in here hahahhahahahahahaha


Whatever.
a c 96 à CPUs
August 8, 2012 2:25:08 AM

jay_nar2012 said:
Thanks for the info...
But my heatsink has a 40mm-60mm fan, here are some comparisons between the heatsink, a coke can and a poundland screwdriver kit...
Maybe mine isn't that hot as the die size is 90nm compared to the first prescotts.


That is a newer server heatsink. You can tell because it has screw fittings (seen on servers, desktop units had the $^#&ing push pins), a 4-wire PWM fan and heatpipes (which both came out years after the Prescott did.) That's a much better heatsink than what originally shipped with Prescotts when they were new. It should have no trouble keeping a Prescott cool as most standard-wattage server CPUs have a full-load heat output fairly similar to a Prescott.

All Prescotts are 90 nm. The code name changes when the transistor size changes. A 180 nm Pentium 4 is a Willamette, a 130 nm unit is a Northwood, and a 65 nm P4 is a Cedar Mill.
August 8, 2012 2:39:15 AM

I would just raise the temperature of the room by a couple dozen degrees C. No other funny business...
!